USMC not a military department?




 
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April 16th, 2004  
airmen2b
 

Topic: USMC not a military department?


I read that the marines are not a considered a real department of the military unless the coutnry is in wartime. Does anybody else know anything about this?
April 17th, 2004  
JaegerWolf08
 
 
The Marine Corps falls under the Dept. of the Navy.
April 17th, 2004  
airmen2b
 
so they are not thier own entiity? Why dont hte navy people then just recruit people and give them the option of marines during enlistment?
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April 17th, 2004  
FutureRANGER
 
 
You know, the way they've been doing it for the last who-knows-how-many-years works fine, theres no reason to re-invent the wheel here.

My 2 cents.
April 17th, 2004  
airmen2b
 
no you are right futureranger i just was wondering why it was not its own military department ...more or less i was just suprised that it wasnt.
April 19th, 2004  
TacticalEdge
 
being a depeartment of the navy only means that the Corps serves with the navy.... this is more old time than now a days stuff...... the marines are now more of shock and awe troops that hit hard and fast with little prep time... hence the name expeditonary...... the US has relied on these men and women many times for thier dicipline and unique fighting ability... if you were to train them with the navy thier effectiveness would drop(not due to navy training just because it is two very different services)
May 21st, 2004  
silent driller
 
 
It falls into the Dept of the Navy because it was created to be the Navy's infantry/ sharpshooters. I guess you just can't mess with tradition in the Corps!
May 21st, 2004  
Sooners1
 
 
TESTIMONY OF GENERAL CARL E. MUNDY, JR.
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS, RETIRED

BEFORE THE HOUSE ARMED SERVICES COMMITTEE
UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

REGARDING REDESIGNATION OF THE POSITION OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY AS THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY AND THE MARINE CORPS

March 18, 2004


It's my privilege to come before this Committee to speak in support of your consideration of the proposal by Congressman Walter B. Jones to re-designate the position of Secretary of the Navy to Secretary of the Navy and Marine Corps.

In my judgment, this is an action that will accurately align the Secretary's title within his designated authority and responsibilities. The present title is confusing, represents only two-thirds of the uniformed service members in the Department, and is inconsistent with the status of the four Armed Services in the Department of Defense.

This proposal does not portend a change in the status of the Marine Corps within the Department. The status of the Corps, as a distinct Service, has evolved incrementally over many years through the actions of the Congress. Various pieces of long-standing legislation have effectively defined the Corps as an individual service within the Department of the Navy along with the U.S. Navy. More recently, there have been two important pieces of legislation. In 1980, the Congress formalized the status of the Commandant of the Marine Corps as a full member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Less than a decade later, the Goldwater-Nichols Act prescribed individual Service components, including the Marine Corps, within Unified Commands.

Thus, the status of the Marine Corps in the joint force organization and functioning of the Department of Defense is clear and operative. However, the titles "Department of the Navy" and "Secretary of the Navy" lead to some confusion in the public mind, as well as among civilian authorities and other Service members in both U.S. and allied defense establishments, and even in the ranks of the Navy and Marine Corps themselves from time to time as to the partnership of the Navy and Marine Corps within a common Department. Too often, a presumption is made that Marines are part of, or subordinate to the Navy.

I believe the changes proposed in H.R. 1741 will do much to clarify the relationship, responsibilities and functions of the appointed civilian authority over the United States Naval Services. Further, it will strengthen the understanding of the naval force structure within our defense establishment and the two Services that comprise it. Finally, I believe that any Secretary - present, or future - will be very proud to bear the title "Marine", as well as "Navy".

I thank you again for the opportunity to come before you, and will be pleased to respond to your questions.


Then in May, it was officially changed. This wasnt to seperate the two services but to acknowledge that the Marine Corps is a unit of its own within the Navy.
May 21st, 2004  
I.Y.A.A.Y.A.S
 
Wow. i learned something new today. is it kind of how the Air force use to be part of the army...
May 21st, 2004  
Razor
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by airmen2b
Why dont hte navy people then just recruit people and give them the option of marines during enlistment?
That's how the Brits do it... But you know us Americans we just have to do things the hard way.