Talented German commanders. - Page 3




 
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January 6th, 2012  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Hans-Ulrich von Luck and Kurt Meyer (Panzer Meyer) perhaps?
January 7th, 2012  
samneanderthal
 
Hi Monty,
Access to Alexandria would have reuced his logistics problems much more and created a nightmare for Britain
January 8th, 2012  
lljadw
 
It would not,unless the British would not destroyed the port of Alexandria
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January 11th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Ok how about Generalleutnant Hyazinth Graf von Strachwitz?
Here is brief run down on his qualifications:

By the time of the Operation Barbarossa, Graf Strachwitz (holding the rank of Major) commanded the first battalion of Panzer Regiment 2, being awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross on 25 August 1941. On 13 November 1942, he became the 144th soldier to be awarded the Oak Leaves to the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross, by now commanding the entire regiment. Fighting on the northern front of the Stalingrad pocket, his unit destroyed 105 Soviet tanks without loss; he was seriously wounded and lucky enough to be evacuated before the Stalingrad pocket collapsed.

By January 1943, "der Panzergraf" (The Armoured Count, as he was by then known) was an Oberst and given command of Panzer Regiment Grossdeutschland. Not long after followed the award of the Swords to the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross, on 28 March 1943, for his part in the counterattack at Kharkov.

In November 1943, Strachwitz left the Grossdeutschland on what were termed grounds of ill health in the official record. Off the record, tension existed between Graf Strachwitz and GD's divisional commander, Generalleutnant "Papa" Hoernlein. Some veterans feel that the true reason for his leaving lied there.

Graf Strachwitz has been described as a good tactician at the battalion and regimental level, but also as being inflexible not open to compromise.


Being recalled to active duty after extended sick leave in January 1944, and with promotion to Generalmajor d.R. (der Reserve), Graf Strachwitz went on to become the 11th soldier of the German Armed Forces to be awarded the Diamonds to the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross, on 15 April 1944. He briefly commanded the 1st Panzer Division during this time.


He was in Russia on the Courland front in late August 1944, inspecting the front, when he was injured severely in an automobile accident. To that point he had already been wounded thirteen times. With great powers of recuperation, The Armoured Count was soon back in action, and after promotion to Generalleutnant in January 1945, was first raising new armoured units, and then once again planning the defence of his Silesian homeland.

The qualities described above are felt by some to have prevented effective command by him of a division-size formation. His skill and bravery at lower levels had always shone through, and Strachwitz was at his best acting independently, without having to interact with officers of equal or superior rank.

He continued to lead his troops despite poor heath which manifested itself by an inability to walk,severe headaches and long spells spent unconscious inside his vehicle. Nonetheless, he looked to his troops first, and he led his men west out of what was to become the Soviet zone of occupation to surrender to the Americans rather than be captured by the Russians.

Having lost two sons during the war, he would go on to lose his wife while in captivity. His Silesian estate was taken by the Russians, and Strachwitz remained in West Germany upon his release from US custody. After a brief journey to Syria to help organize the military there (and his subsequent flight from Syria after the ruling power was overthrown), he settled on an estate in Bavaria in 1951, where he lived until 1968. He lies today in Grabenstätt, Germany, having passed away shy of his 75th birthday.

He was the most decorated regimental officer of the German panzer army in WWII.

Awards:
Knight cross 25.08.1941
Oak leaves (144) 13.11.1942
Swords (027) 28.03.1943
Diamonds (011) 15.04.1944
Tank combat badge in gold (4th stage)
Citation in the Wehrmacht Report
Wounding Badge in Gold

Source: Tigers in Action
January 12th, 2012  
Der Alte
 
Impressive number of good suggestions.
It's fun to see what names that comes up.
January 12th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
I don't know a much harder question would have been "Talentless German Commanders" I think that since the change away from ranks determined by "social position" in the 17th and 18th century the worlds officer corps has become increasingly professional and competent (sorry Sam) and it is harder and harder to find inherently bad ones.

However both Hoth and Heinrici are two that I have always wanted to know more about but never really tried to find out about, one day I will have to devote time to their careers.
January 17th, 2012  
cdwoods
 
 
The magazine "WORLD WAR II", Vol. 23, NO. 1, (April/May 2008) from the Weider History Group, had a very good write up on General Balck (General der Panzertruppe) when he commanded the 11th Panzer Division on the Eastern Front during WWII.
January 17th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Germany had many fine commanders throughout WW2:
Eberbach
Hausser
Hoepner
Hube
Student
Schweppenburg
Steiner
to name a few...

Both Kesselring and Vietinghoff did an impressive job at holding up the Allied advance in Italy (yes I know it is a defenders paradise) with very limited resources.

Hans-Jürgen von Arnim who performed well under Guderian and took over the remnants of Panzer Armee Afrika holding off both the British and American forces for almost 6 months with almost no resources.

Then you have the likes of U-Boat commanders Otto Kretschmer and Wolfgang Luth who between them sank 500,000 tons of allied shipping

You also have Erich Hartmann and Erich Barkhorn who are the only men to have scored 300+ kills (and will probably remain so forever) and went on to help rebuild the Luftwaffe of today.


However I think an honourable mention for best name and role to suit would have to go to...

General of Mountain Troops (General der Gebirgstruppe) August Winter.
January 18th, 2012  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Germany had many fine commanders throughout WW2:
Eberbach
Hausser
Hoepner
Hube
Student
Schweppenburg
Steiner
to name a few...

Both Kesselring and Vietinghoff did an impressive job at holding up the Allied advance in Italy (yes I know it is a defenders paradise) with very limited resources.

Hans-Jürgen von Arnim who performed well under Guderian and took over the remnants of Panzer Armee Afrika holding off both the British and American forces for almost 6 months with almost no resources.

Then you have the likes of U-Boat commanders Otto Kretschmer and Wolfgang Luth who between them sank 500,000 tons of allied shipping

You also have Erich Hartmann and Erich Barkhorn who are the only men to have scored 300+ kills (and will probably remain so forever) and went on to help rebuild the Luftwaffe of today.


However I think an honourable mention for best name and role to suit would have to go to...

General of Mountain Troops (General der Gebirgstruppe) August Winter.
What about the General that with very few available tanks opened a corridor so the Northern Army Group could evacuate from the trap in Estonia, when the Soviets encircled them. Help me out here, guys. I do not remember his name. Perhaps someone here has mention him already
January 18th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostrider
What about the General that with very few available tanks opened a corridor so the Northern Army Group could evacuate from the trap in Estonia, when the Soviets encircled them. Help me out here, guys. I do not remember his name. Perhaps someone here has mention him already
I am assuming you mean Army Group Courland (Heeresgruppe Kurland) and yes they did a great job as did the Kriegsmarine in keeping them supplied.

The commanders of Heeresgruppe Kurland were:
- Ferdinand Schoerner
- Lothar Rendulic
- Heinrich von Vietinghoff
- Carl Hilpert
 


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