Talented German commanders. - Page 2




 
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December 27th, 2011  
lljadw
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
With his famous line (if I'm not mistaken) : Give us Spitfires!
I think you have seen to much "the battle of Britain"
December 28th, 2011  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljadw
I think you have seen to much "the battle of Britain"
I've seen that movie but it's a long time ago. But here you can find this : to which Galland replied "Then give me a squadron of Spitfires".

another link here :
Quote:
As for Galland's quote on 'give me spitfires...', either I got it from the book cited earlier in this thread 'The First and the Last' or my father, who met Galland on several occasions on business (after the war of course , told me he said it.
December 28th, 2011  
lljadw
 
1)From Great Aviation Myths:
in his book,Galland said:it was not really meant that way,I preferred the Me 109.
Previously,Galland had had a collision with Goering,who accused the fighters of being a bunch of machos,who only were looking for medals and did not care about the bombers .Galland was pissed.(IMHO,Goering was not totally wrong)
2)From WWII Aviation Mythbusters P4:
Galland said :I should like an outfit of Spitfires for my squadron .
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January 2nd, 2012  
samneanderthal
 
Gotthard Heinrici, der Giftzwerg. He had Jewish blood on his mother's side. On his father's side his military lineage harkened back to the 12th century.
He was the master of defence.
January 2nd, 2012  
senojekips
 
 
I can't really say if he was truly "gifted" as a commander, but my Father in Law who fought in the Western Desert said that Allied troops had a great respect for Erwin Rommel.

The little that I have read seems to indicate that he was perhaps viewed by his peers, as more "popular" than "great". Never the less I feel that he is certainly worthy of mention.
January 2nd, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Rommel I have had trouble with as he is one of those leaders that we grew up with along with the fable of the Desert Fox but a lot of what I read about him gives me the impression he was more rash and impulsive than intuitive and to some degree think von Arnim may have done a better job in North Africa.

That being said I believe his time in North Africa taught him about allied air superiority and agreed completely with his views about the defence of France in that the allies had to be defeated on the beaches therefore the Panzer reserve needed to be closer to the beach heads.

In the end his reputation was maintained through his involvement with the July bomb plot and there is no doubt that he gained a lot of respect from the 8th Army in the desert.
January 2nd, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by senojekips
I can't really say if he was truly "gifted" as a commander, but my Father in Law who fought in the Western Desert said that Allied troops had a great respect for Erwin Rommel.

The little that I have read seems to indicate that he was perhaps viewed by his peers, as more "popular" than "great". Never the less I feel that he is certainly worthy of mention.
My uncle Charlie who was in the LRDG had a lot of respect for Rommel, Rommel treated POW's with honour, congratulating them for putting up a good fight.

On top of that, he was a true "Gentleman."
January 4th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
How about Hasso von Manteuffel, another very good defensive commander played a major role in helping von Arnim hold up the Allies in North Africa against fairly impressive odds and did the same on the Eastern Front and for a while commanded the Gro▀deutschland which many people consider the finest German fighting formation of the war.
January 6th, 2012  
samneanderthal
 
Yes, Manteuffel was a very gifted general both offensively (under Hoth in Barbarossa)and defensively late in the war.

Although Rommel is very admired and popular, one cannot help to wonder if he could not have been much more successful isolating Tobruk and advancing into Egypt when the British were on the run, instead of wasting 240 days and 8,000 men trying unsuccessfully to capture Tobruk. The British received a lot of supplies and troops in NA during this time. By the way, during this long time of high losses with no success he was extremely unpopular among his officers.
January 6th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
The problem is that Tobruk was one of the few ports and access to it would have reduced his logistics problems quite considerably.
 


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