Stinger Missiles against Supersonic Cruise Missiles - Page 2




 
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December 20th, 2005  
Forrest_Gump
 
This question is a non-starter. As far as I know "Cruise Missiles" do not cruise at super sonic speeds. The only time they might make super sonic (Mach 1) is during an attack profile that requires a final high speed dive into the target.

That standard attack profiles involve either a seaborne launch (off of a ship) or an airborne launch. The missile assumes a fairly low level, usually only a few hundred feet off the ground, and cruise at around 500 mph to the target in a terrain hugging flight. The target determines the terminal flight profile, either low and level for an airburst or side penetration of the target, or the missile will gain altitude and then dive for a top penetration.

Cruise Missiles are generally employed at night because of their flight profile. Low and relatively slow is not the way to survive in hostile airspace.

Could someone bring one down with a Stinger? Sure why not. If the variables are right, and the gunner is good, or lucky, at hit could probably be scored.

But the same applies to a guy with a Marlin 60 .22LR.

Heres a link to Raytheon's fact sheet.

http://www.raytheon.com/products/ste...s01_055764.pdf
December 20th, 2005  
FO Seaman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forrest_Gump
This question is a non-starter. As far as I know "Cruise Missiles" do not cruise at super sonic speeds. The only time they might make super sonic (Mach 1) is during an attack profile that requires a final high speed dive into the target.

That standard attack profiles involve either a seaborne launch (off of a ship) or an airborne launch. The missile assumes a fairly low level, usually only a few hundred feet off the ground, and cruise at around 500 mph to the target in a terrain hugging flight. The target determines the terminal flight profile, either low and level for an airburst or side penetration of the target, or the missile will gain altitude and then dive for a top penetration.

Cruise Missiles are generally employed at night because of their flight profile. Low and relatively slow is not the way to survive in hostile airspace.

Could someone bring one down with a Stinger? Sure why not. If the variables are right, and the gunner is good, or lucky, at hit could probably be scored.

But the same applies to a guy with a Marlin 60 .22LR.

Heres a link to Raytheon's fact sheet.

http://www.raytheon.com/products/ste...s01_055764.pdf

In my exprinces a Marlin 60 .22LR doesn't use Passive IR to seek targets and is Fire and Forget.
December 21st, 2005  
Forrest_Gump
 
What? Your .22LR's don't have passive IR? You need to shop at better stores LOL.

No really, I was just making the point that almost anything, no matter how improbable, is to some point "possible".

Years ago when I was in the CAP, a cadet was getting flight lessons when the Senior Member Instructor took a hit in the leg from a .22LR that was fired by some moron on the ground. The cadet managed to land the plane and everything worked out alright. They caught the idiot that did it, and he admitted that he was trying to hit the plane, but since it was so high (1,000+ feet) he didn't think he would actually score a hit.

Dumb luck, good and bad, all the way around.
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December 21st, 2005  
FO Seaman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forrest_Gump
What? Your .22LR's don't have passive IR? You need to shop at better stores LOL.

No really, I was just making the point that almost anything, no matter how improbable, is to some point "possible".

Years ago when I was in the CAP, a cadet was getting flight lessons when the Senior Member Instructor took a hit in the leg from a .22LR that was fired by some moron on the ground. The cadet managed to land the plane and everything worked out alright. They caught the idiot that did it, and he admitted that he was trying to hit the plane, but since it was so high (1,000+ feet) he didn't think he would actually score a hit.

Dumb luck, good and bad, all the way around.

Scary.... But big difference, a Stinger is not a direct fire weapon while a .22LR being a direct fire weapon. Whole reason for the Patriot PAC-3 is to defeat missile threats.
December 21st, 2005  
major liability
 
 
Even in the cruise missile was going much faster than the Stinger, you could still hit it from the front as it approaches. It would take a bit of luck and good positioning, but it could be done. I don't know of any cruise missiles that take evasive action when they're fired upon.
December 21st, 2005  
FO Seaman
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by major liability
Even in the cruise missile was going much faster than the Stinger, you could still hit it from the front as it approaches. It would take a bit of luck and good positioning, but it could be done. I don't know of any cruise missiles that take evasive action when they're fired upon.
Maybe if it where a TOW like system, but the Stinger uses Passive IR to track targets. Meaning it needs a heat source to track.
December 22nd, 2005  
major_sam47
 
The Russians have a supersonic cruise missile called Oynx. I wonder what altitude US radar would have to be situated at to be effective in detecting one.
January 17th, 2006  
major_sam47
 

Topic: Need more feedback


Has this topic been adequately concluded ?

There hasn't been enough analysis here of how exactly a stinger would have to intercept a cruise missile to successfully destroy it. Raytheon claims in their specifications for Stingers that cruise missiles can be intercepted by a Stinger, but how ? What angle, aspect, and in what response time ?

Other MANPADS like the Mistral can move up to Mach 3.5 which should be enough speed for good reaction to an incoming Sunburn. At what altitude would an appropriate UAV radar have to be situated in order to successfully detect in incoming cruise missile within a 15 km radius in a look down radar mode ? Does anybody know ? Can MANPAD missiles compete with a cruise missile employing a circuitous, ground hugging route ?

Does a heat seeking stinger need to be coming in from behind a cruise missile to be successfully guided to the target using its heat signature ? What aspect would increase the probability of success ?
January 18th, 2006  
Insight
 
 
The whole discussion is a bit of a non-starter really. You've got to be able to acquire and track a cruise missile before you can target it. I'm not aware of many AD systems that can track and pass targeting info to a stinger.
January 19th, 2006  
major_sam47
 
Yes, I see what you are saying. What AD systems are there that could do this ? Its hard to understand why a Stinger system couldn't be designed to take that kind of data.

Raytheon is fielding an Aerostat which would be able to radar cruise missiles. Could not data acquired by such means be passed on to a MANPAD ? What would the limitations be with the MANPAD receiver ?