Soviet Superweapon used vs CHina in the 60s - Page 3




 
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February 12th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
Haven't lived there in years, but gavins point, big bend, oahe, and ft. randell.
February 13th, 2005  
Sexybeast
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by victortsoi
lol, my father also told me that when he was in the college for civil engineering the leading civil engineer was put into a mental hospital for daring to tell khrustchev that his plan of making two dams on one river was wrong....
planned economy always make mistakes like that..

that is why russia and china transform its economy into market economy.....


but i got to say Khrustchev is pretty friendly towards west and i agree with his condematioin of Stalin....
February 13th, 2005  
MadeInChina
 
welll, if u look at the volga or don or the dniper river, than you could see a series of lakes next to each other

now thats overdamning 8)
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February 14th, 2005  
victortsoi
 
yeah it wasnt even for navigation the stated purpose was electricity generation.
its a pretty simple Potential Energy equation for the amount of energy a river can provide and only one dam can be used on one river...khrustchev wouldnt agree.
February 14th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
I as far as I know there are no locks on the Missouri river and there is minimal barge traffic North of Yankton, and there 4 dams above Yankton in South Dakota, at least 2 more in North Dakota, and I believe at least 1 in Montana.

They are there for power generation and flood control.

So maybe old Kruschev should have moved to North Dakota.
February 14th, 2005  
rocco
 
this is what i know, my dad told me he left soviet union cuz he didnt want to go to the army (its like a jail)... the dispute was over an island, the russians were outnumbered... not sure if they were loosing or not, but they bombed the whole island, killing both chinese and russians together, i think there was atleast 100k people there... this might be a rumour...
February 16th, 2005  
Damien435
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zucchini
I as far as I know there are no locks on the Missouri river and there is minimal barge traffic North of Yankton, and there 4 dams above Yankton in South Dakota, at least 2 more in North Dakota, and I believe at least 1 in Montana.

They are there for power generation and flood control.

So maybe old Kruschev should have moved to North Dakota.
Barge traffic no longer goes past Sioux City, if they even make it that far. A lot of debate has been started over this lately, the lower states on the Missourri (Missourri, Iowa, Nebraska) want more water to be released by the dams to increase commerce, the upper states (South Dakota, North Dakota, and Montana) want less water released to aid our economies, mostly fishing. This has been brought to the district court a couple times over the last couple of years. The Army Corps of Engineers still manages the dams, we in South Dakota want control turned over to the states or to have the current plans for managing the water flow changed. I personally think that they should be handed over to the state, but then again that is the option that most benefits me.
February 16th, 2005  
Missileer
 
 
I guess this is getting way off the thread but I worked on towboats for an independent engineering company and installed and serviced xenon searchlights. I worked the area of the Mississippi close to Alton, Ill. where the Missouri emptied into the Mississippi. I never caught a boat going up the Missouri but I worked from the St. Paul headwaters to the Gulf of the Mississippi. I'll post some pictures I took while I was working the boats in the Chit Chat area. I also worked the Tennessee River, Monongehela, and some I don't remember.
June 8th, 2005  
vargsriket
 
Old topic, just thought I'd clear some things.

The conflict was about a small island not defined in the border agreement between Russia and China, the island of Damanskiy. The conflict happened in 1969, on March 2 and March 15. About 300 Chinese soldiers attacked a platoon of 55 Russian border troops that were patrolling the island. In the initial surprise attack, 31 Russian troops were killed, and 14 were wounded, but the battle was won by the Russians. On march 15, the Chinese reinforced their positions and attacked again. Chinese brought serious equipment and a division of ground troops. Even though Russians held their positions for about 2 hours, reinforcements were never brought in, and they had to retreat in view of the superior forces that the Chinese had amassed. The Soviets realized that they didn't how enough men that day to take the island, and used their 'secret' artillery equipment, Grad (hail), or BM-21. Fire was opened upon Chinese positions, essentially obliterating the island with tremendous firepower. Most of the Chinese troops were killed, and after that major combat operations were over. There were some minor firefights afterwards, but in September of the same year, the island was given to the PRC.

58 Russian soldiers were killed, 94 wounded. 4 soldiers recieved the highest military award for their actions, Hero of the Soviet Union, 2 awarded posthumously.

It's estimated about 700+ Chinese troops were killed in combat. I guess we'll never know the real amount.
September 7th, 2007  
Supostat
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by victortsoi
My father was in the red navy during the early 70s, and during this time border skirmishes flared up with the chinese all the time. There was a rumour throughout soviet military that they had used some superweapon to obliterate the disputed island of Damansk.
dad doesnt neccesarily believe the story, but im curious as if it has some kernel of truth.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sino-So...order_conflict
As I understood, the `superweapon` was Soviet MLRS `Grad`:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BM-21