Serbian war - Page 3




 
--
 
March 15th, 2009  
Balkan-MiG
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Partisan
Actually, from what I discovered everyone was a nationalist, be they Serb, Croat, Montenegran, Bosnian or just unhappy with their lot.

That is really ignorant.

Not everybody in the Balkans is a nationalist, thats like claiming everbody in the USA is a Zionist, or like claiming that everyboy in the USA likes Obama.

There are still large numbers of Communists in the Balkans [Serbia having the least, and I beleive Slovenia having the most]. Yes, there are nationalists, but not everyone is.

I am friends with fellow Communist comrades in Serbia [And Republika Srpska], and I am proud to be their comrade.
March 15th, 2009  
Partisan
 
 
Balkan Mig just to clarify my meaning - by Nationalist, I am saying supportinve of their own nation state. In the Former Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) everyone seems to want to be independent of everyone else, that is based on experience and observation - but I am not an expert.

The divisions run along ethnic & religious lines, but the overriding sentiment sems to be that FRY was artificial and as each region should go it separate way, or at least be free to make friends with whoever they want to.

This situation is further confused by the fact that there are no clear geographic divides & that the population has moved around, so you have settlements of one ethnic group sat in the middle of the enclave of another ethnic group & so on.

In summary I'm not talking about political orientation, more about the fundamental divides between the peoples of the FRY.
March 15th, 2009  
Balkan-MiG
 
 
No, in SFRJ everybody co-existed peacefully with eachother, under the leadership of the greatest leader, known as Josip Broz Tito. Serbians and Croats worked and lived together with no troubles [Religiously no, religion was allowed in SFRJ but wasnt popular].

The Nationalism started after Tito died, and when Slobodan Milosevic started turning the country ino a hole.

Most likely, if Tito banned religion altogether, there might not have been such problems with nationalism. But Tito was a kind man, he gave us total freedom to do what we want [Considering if it was legal].

In SFRJ [At least in Tito's time], it would be very hard to find a Croat, Bosnian or Serb arguing amongst each other about religion. That would have been like a Texan arguing with a Californian about whos state is better.

Unfortunately,Tito couldnt live forever. If he could, there would still be great Yugoslavia, not this messup of hotch-potch countries in the Balkans.
--
March 16th, 2009  
gotcha1234
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balkan-MiG
That is really ignorant.

Not everybody in the Balkans is a nationalist, thats like claiming everbody in the USA is a Zionist, or like claiming that everyboy in the USA likes Obama.

There are still large numbers of Communists in the Balkans [Serbia having the least, and I beleive Slovenia having the most]. Yes, there are nationalists, but not everyone is.

I am friends with fellow Communist comrades in Serbia [And Republika Srpska], and I am proud to be their comrade.

I believe he said everyone was nationalist.And when the war was there it really was such.

As for myself I dislike communists,because i dislike communism.
March 16th, 2009  
Damien435
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balkan-MiG
Unfortunately,Tito couldnt live forever. If he could, there would still be great Yugoslavia, not this messup of hotch-potch countries in the Balkans.
Highly doubt it, when Reagan targeted Yugoslavia for economic destruction that was checkmate for the Communist Party and when times are hard old grievances have a way of coming back into the fore front. Yugoslavia was too dependent on trade with the West and loans from Western banks to survive the sudden loss of support from those areas of the world, especially given the poor relationship between Yugoslavia and the USSR, granted Tito was one of the most popular leaders in the world (the massive turnout at his funeral from every country in the world can attest to this) but if the Yugoslav economy that was already in a protracted recession collapsed even Tito would be unable to hold such an unlikely conglomeration of ethnic groups together. Yugoslavia might still be around, but it just didn't stand a chance when the political situation changed and the US decided to pounce on Yugoslavia rather than continue to support the country as it was by no means firmly in the Soviet camp.
March 17th, 2009  
Balkan-MiG
 
 
Yugoslavia's economy would have definitely stammered greatly, but it would have managed to regain itself, maybe not totally, but fairly [From sources, ive heard that Yugoslavia was one of the countries quickest to recover from WW2].
Also, Yugoslavia wasnt a strong trading partner with the west. It had trade with countries that the USA wasnt holding by the balls, and that werent total crap holes either.

Either way, we will never know what happened. Seeing as nobody can live forever, and Tito was only human.
March 17th, 2009  
Del Boy
 
As I remember, Tito was the strong man who kept Stalin at bay, and thereby maintained a greater degree of independence than the other satellite countries. We found Yogslavia relaxed and easy to trade with and a favourite holiday choice of many. I never visited myself, but i did travel among the 'Iron Curtain' countries during the cold war.

I was involved in great business ventures with Yugoslav industries for many years in early sixties. The quality of their work was very high and reliable; in the field I worked in, the highest quality of the Iron Curtain countries, a class act. I was absolutely shocked to see Belgrade bombed, I have to say.
March 18th, 2009  
Partisan
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Del Boy
As I remember, Tito was the strong man who kept Stalin at bay, and thereby maintained a greater degree of independence than the other satellite countries. We found Yogslavia relaxed and easy to trade with and a favourite holiday choice of many. I never visited myself, but i did travel among the 'Iron Curtain' countries during the cold war.

I was involved in great business ventures with Yugoslav industries for many years in early sixties. The quality of their work was very high and reliable; in the field I worked in, the highest quality of the Iron Curtain countries, a class act. I was absolutely shocked to see Belgrade bombed, I have to say.
To me this was the problem, Tito held Yugoslavia together, using a wide range of tactics. He juggled the balls superbly, political unrest was quashed, as was any form of dissent. But when he died there was no one to take over - who had a major power backing them & who was willing to step in & destroy any opposition. The result, is what we have today, a long way from perfect, but better than it was.
March 18th, 2009  
Balkan-MiG
 
 
I totally agree with the last two posts. Id much prefer to live in 50's-70's Yugoslavia than any other place in the world [Particularly Australia, no offence to any Aussies out there].

Once Tito died, everything unwravelled like a Bulgarian sports jacket [I like that metaphor]. And yes, it was much better now than it was during the 80's and definitely the 90's.
March 20th, 2009  
gotcha1234
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balkan-MiG
I totally agree with the last two posts. Id much prefer to live in 50's-70's Yugoslavia than any other place in the world [Particularly Australia, no offence to any Aussies out there].

Once Tito died, everything unwravelled like a Bulgarian sports jacket [I like that metaphor]. And yes, it was much better now than it was during the 80's and definitely the 90's.
I'd rather disagree.I would rather be on my own ground than rich in a country that simply is not mine.
 


Similar Topics
Economists Debate Link Between War, Credit Crisis
Making War Difficult
Estimates Of Iraq War Cost Were Not Close To Ballpark
Five Years - And Counting - Of War
The Cost Of War, Unnoticed