Saving Private Ryan - Page 5




 
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February 5th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
Your UNCLE? How old are you?
February 5th, 2005  
Zucchini
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_13th_redneck
Your UNCLE? How old are you?
52.

My Uncle was the commanding officer of the 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry during D-Day operations. He was seriously wounded 19 days after the invasion and never returned to combat duty - Silver Star, Bronze Star, and Purple Heart.

He passed away about two years before Saving Private Ryan came out.
February 5th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
"Personally I would rather he made a film about ordinary G.I.'s - the regular infantrymen. Being by turns bored, wet, hungry, scared and wanting to go home!"

Doesn't sound to me like you saw the movie.
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February 5th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
Because that's exactly what the movie was about.
February 5th, 2005  
easyaction
 
Whispering Death - I take your point - my comments at this point lacked clarity of logic - I think that means I may have got it wrong!
Charge -7 - I did see the film, but your inference is accepted. The ending of my piece was inappropriate.
As my name indicates I am an armchair general. Consequently my views have much of the second-hand about them.
My interest in Normandy has been limited - even though my father served there.
And although it may seem that I am pushing a British point of view at the expense of primarily the Americans, in fact my interest is in the ordinary conscript or enlisted men as opposed to the elite troops of D-Day and the Normandy campaign.
Alexander McKee wrote 40 years ago of the British infantrymen training and marching in England for some distant return to Europe - and of how the Germans would die laughing when they encountered them.
It is in the manner of this self mocking attitude that I write. It is the ordinariness of the British and US soldiers that interests me.
My father was part of the assault on Villers-Bocage and the continuing move towards Caen. His active service in Normandy lasted less than a month. His life as a civilian afterwards lasted more than half a century and some of those years were coloured by his weeks in France.
So my interest is a personal and selfish one.
February 5th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
Remember that there are plenty of World War II films that include the British in them. Saving Private Ryan was not a historical documentary. It was a story about a guy (Miller) who justified his actions by concluding that by doing what he did.... and sometimes losing a guy or two, he was saving ten times the number. In comes a new mission and that justification is thrown out the door.
That's what it was about. That's why the other beaches weren't shown.
The 2nd largest foreign presence in Vietnam after the US was South Korea. How many Vietnam movies or TV series have you actually seen South Korean troops in Vietnam? Practically none. I just heard "Korean" once in an episode of Tour of Duty. But hey, I don't ***** about it. We make our own movies that take place in Vietnam. So Britain's got to make its own movies about its own folks.
February 5th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
"my interest is in the ordinary conscript or enlisted men as opposed to the elite troops of D-Day and the Normandy campaign"

Actually the vanguard of the assault force at Omaha Beach "Bloody Omaha" was accomplished by National Guardsmen from the 29th Infantry Division composed of citizen soldiers from Virginia, Maryland, Massachusetts, North Carolina and Connecticut. So although there were elite forces there to be sure, the worst of it was shouldered by a divison that was not even in the regular Army.
February 5th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
Intel said it should have been an easy beach, so I guess they assigned the units accordingly.
February 5th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
You're probably right about that 13th. The 29th "Blue and Grey" though showed them that there was plenty of fight in the National Guard. In later campaigns they were used as any other divison without regard for what would be easy. So they proved their worth that day.
February 13th, 2005  
Missileer
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_13th_redneck
Remember that there are plenty of World War II films that include the British in them. Saving Private Ryan was not a historical documentary. It was a story about a guy (Miller) who justified his actions by concluding that by doing what he did.... and sometimes losing a guy or two, he was saving ten times the number. In comes a new mission and that justification is thrown out the door.
That's what it was about. That's why the other beaches weren't shown.
The 2nd largest foreign presence in Vietnam after the US was South Korea. How many Vietnam movies or TV series have you actually seen South Korean troops in Vietnam? Practically none. I just heard "Korean" once in an episode of Tour of Duty. But hey, I don't b**ch about it. We make our own movies that take place in Vietnam. So Britain's got to make its own movies about its own folks.
Once again, I am humbled by your insight 13th. If the American film makers attempted an action drama based on the everyday feelings, actions, and reactions of the South Korean troops serving in VietNam, it would be a flop because there is no way they could portray the SK side as effectively as a film maker in South Korea. And vise-versa. The story of a country's idea of how a war movie should depict that country's participation should be made by that country. America may be "into" war movies a little more than most other countries resulting in more being produced and, obviously, coming from an American perspective.

A lot of countries are more likely to make artsy or present day life situations type films and violence is not a big box office subject. Some totalitarian Governments simply dictate what can and can't be made. My humble opinion only.