Rapid Deployment Force - Page 2




 
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September 17th, 2004  
soldierzhonor
 
 
yup, we had a DRF status the whole time your with the 18th airborne corps.Deployment Readiness Force 1 is wheels up and enroute in a matter of hours. DRF1 through DRF3 best I recollect.
November 23rd, 2005  
FULLMETALJACKET
 
 
Marines. forst to fight. by land air or sea.
November 23rd, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FULLMETALJACKET
Marines. forst to fight. by land air or sea.
Not always. It depends on the response needed and the time frame.
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November 23rd, 2005  
sleepyscout
 
 
82nd airborne is are rapid deployment force or it was till the war in iraq i dont know if it still is. During the 80's and 90's one brigade was on call and could be deployed boots on the ground any were in the world in like 12 hours or some thing might be 24 not sure on exact time. The other brigades rotated through the phases. The whole division was deployable in a few days. With the global war on terrisom we have prepostioned units around the world to act as a rapid deployment force. For instance there is a heavy mech brigade stationed in kuwait. I am not a marine so I dont know but arnt the meu's prepostioned arounnd the world as well to act as a rapid deployment force all my information comes from books written in the 90's I am sure its all changed.
November 23rd, 2005  
phoenix80
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doody
The 101st Airborne Division has units that are always ready to deploy with in a day of being alerted. Basically, you bags are packed and ready to go. If you do not have a cell, you must let your command know where you are at all times. Sometimes we would be alerted to see how ready we were. We would go as far as loading trucks onto rail heads and sit in a hanger to simulate flying.

Light infantry is always the right choice for rapid deployment. Each soldier in a light infantry division needs only 2 duffel bags and a ruck sack to deploy. Also, HMMWV's are easy to deploy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GuyontheRight
Could the entire XVIII Airborne Corps be considered "rapidly deplyed?"
I would say that the 18th Airborne Corps can be used as a rapid deployment force. When you need to get soldiers deployed fast, the 82nd Airborne, 101st Airborne and 10th mountain Divisions best fit that roll.
informative post!

thnx
November 29th, 2005  
FULLMETALJACKET
 
 
ok. thanks 03 . first***
November 29th, 2005  
Whispering Death
 
 
Isn't the Army working on having a Division sized unit able to field Strykers anywhere in the world within 72 hours?
November 30th, 2005  
OORAH
 
 
dont forget, it also depends upon the size of the operations you are talking about, as to how long a deployment takes.

With this Rapid Deployment Force, what are you talking about, are you saying, get their, secure the position, and wait for the rest of the Division or Battalion to get there, or are you talking about having an entire Division or Battalion ready to go at a moments notice


December 5th, 2005  
KJ
 
 
I reckon from his original post that he wishes to hear your opinion on EU,s new "battlegroups"..If he didn\t I would like to hear opinions and/or comments.

//KJ.
December 5th, 2005  
sunb!
 
 
There are differences between Europe and the USA on this - like Norwegian IRF and RRF (Rapid Reaction Forces) were on 24 hour to 72 hours standby and the RRF/NSE with heavier equipment and vehicles came in the theatre after 7 to 14 days depending on the situation and location. The IRF force is set up as a light infantry brigade with equipment such as TOW, 81mm mortars and so on.

The US Marine Corps personell and the Canadian ones that were marked for operation in Northern Norway in case of a Russian invasion, were on 7 days notice, but a frontline unit could be deployed immediately thanks to the pre-located armour and equipment in the country.

This was in the mid 1990s, so the concept might have changed for my country's concern.