RAF Jurong and Operation Rimau - Page 3




 
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July 13th, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
I arrived in Singapore in late November 1967, I arrived at Jurong a few weeks later just before Christmas which was after the exhumation of the bodies, so I'm I afraid that cannot tell you very much more then I have. Perhaps the chaps at Jurong who were there before me can be of more help.

The only other information I have is, RAF Jurong was originally Radio Malaya, when the Japanese invaded they took the site over for their own use. At the end of the war the RAF took over from the Japanese. If I remember correctly it was also shared with Cable and Wireless during my time there.
July 13th, 2012  
Kabor
 
Thanks Brit, sorry to be such a pain but really appreciate your help.

It seems odd that the War Graves Commission said they were the remains of the Rimau men when there records would have shown them already exhumed in 1946. Too odd, no smoke without fire maybe…

I’ve tried to work out whereabouts RAF Jurong was on google maps and guessing somewhere around the outskirts of the University and facing I guess the straits which would obviously be perfect as an outpost for either the Japanese or RAF. Whether they held POWs their might be anyone’s guess, I can’t find anything yet.

I’m afraid I think you need to be RAF (or ex) and have been stationed at Jurong to have access to that. I did put a request through but then read the conditions so as a civvy, it’s unlikely for me to have access. If you had contact name, that would be great – I’m not sure if Mick is still checking this site.

Brit, many, many thanks again

Best wishes
July 14th, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kabor
Thanks Brit, sorry to be such a pain but really appreciate your help.

It seems odd that the War Graves Commission said they were the remains of the Rimau men when there records would have shown them already exhumed in 1946. Too odd, no smoke without fire maybe…

I’ve tried to work out whereabouts RAF Jurong was on google maps and guessing somewhere around the outskirts of the University and facing I guess the straits which would obviously be perfect as an outpost for either the Japanese or RAF. Whether they held POWs their might be anyone’s guess, I can’t find anything yet.

I’m afraid I think you need to be RAF (or ex) and have been stationed at Jurong to have access to that. I did put a request through but then read the conditions so as a civvy, it’s unlikely for me to have access. If you had contact name, that would be great – I’m not sure if Mick is still checking this site.

Brit, many, many thanks again

Best wishes
My pleasure. It also took me a while to find out exactly what happened to my uncle John. Until a couple of years ago before contacting FEPOW I didn't know that he actually died on the Sandekan Death March on 26th March 1945. The Japs said he died of Malaria, they failed to mention the beatings and starvation handed out to the POW's by the bastards. Only 6 Aussies survived because they managed to escape, the rest were deliberately and systematically murdered. My dad had a deep seated hatred of the Japanese until the day he died. My granddad, grandmother and my two aunts never got over Johns death, my grandmother kept a light in her window until she died, which was carried on by my aunts after her death.

Curiously my dad died on 30th March this year, my uncle John died on 26th March 1945, which as you can see, is very close to the anniversary of my uncle Johns death.

A few of us have been trying to find the actual location of RAF Jurong using Google Earth, everything has obviously changed quite a bit. The only guide I can give you is, Jurong was on the South West side of Nangyang University.

I have also been trying to find out what POW's were at Jurong, but I have hit a bit of a brick wall.

Don't hesitate to ask if I can be of more help.
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July 14th, 2012  
Kabor
 
Brit, it is truly heartbreaking to hear the stories from the Sandakan Death March and other FEPOWs tragedies, even more so when hearing the pain and loss from the families themselves. My deepest sympathy to you and your family and for your great losses then and now with your father’s passing this year.

For your father passing only days after the anniversary of your uncle’s death, certainly is very curious, it must have been incredibly hard on him. The anniversaries become any less painful with time.

For the families of the FEPOWs that never made it home, so many like yours waited for years to find out what truly happened to their loved one, details being inaccurate and very difficult to substantiate due to the lack of witnesses left.

Many were told that they were MIA, and still held out hope for some time after the war that their men were delayed in the ensuing chaos after trying to repatriate the soldiers. I wonder how many families left a light on or lit a candle in a window like your Grandmother; I have heard a number of others doing the same.

Others were told, like your family, that their men had died of malaria... it was the most common cause of death given by the Japs regardless of what had actually happened and to cover up massacres and executions. Of course, malaria was extremely widespread and the lack of medical supplies would indeed lead to the loss of many.

It is almost beyond comprehension today, the sheer size of the Second World War, the devastation felt by so many millions over all continents. It must never be forgotten.

Out of the 2434 prisoners incarcerated at Sandakan, 1787 were Australian and 641 were British. And as you say, only 6 Australians survived because they escaped and were helped by the locals. Absolutely truly shocking and tragic.

Brit, have you read Lynette Silver’s ‘Sandakan, Conspiracy of Silence’? She is quite approachable and very knowledgeable – maybe she might be able to help work out more the location of your uncle’s death with the date that you have?

http://sandakan-deathmarch.com/

http://lynettesilver.com/

And a link to more of the Japanese War Atrocities for those who are less aware and interested to learn more:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...war_atrocities

Regarding the location of RAF Jurong, yes, I saw that from the site that attempts were being made to give the exact location of the station, would this be what you thought to? I tried looking at some maps from Singapore online but it is very difficult to work out. If I come across anything meaningful, I shall certainly send on to you. On one site, they indicate that it was very close to the Jurong Bird Park? It must be on RAF archives I guess.

A cheeky favour, but would you be able to ask the RAF Jurong forum if any there remember any more details about the exhumation from 1967 and if they would be willing to speak to me? I will see if I can find anything more out too from other organisations and let you know what I find.

Many thanks Brit and my very best wishes to you and yours
July 14th, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kabor
Brit, it is truly heartbreaking to hear the stories from the Sandakan Death March and other FEPOWs tragedies, even more so when hearing the pain and loss from the families themselves. My deepest sympathy to you and your family and for your great losses then and now with your father’s passing this year.
I didn't know that much about the Sandekan Death Marches until a couple of years ago. Many years ago I was shown a post card from my uncle John when he was a POW simply saying "I am well." which was all he was allowed to say. Then a couple of years ago I began to do a bit more research and the more I looked into it the more angry I became, I then too began to feel a deep hatred for the Japanese. I also lost a family member who was a rear gunner in Bomber Command, he's buried somewhere in Southern Germany, but I don't feel any hatred for German gunners, or any Germans whatsoever, they were doing their job. A few chaps I worked with were POW's in Germany, they were treated fairly. But as regard to the Japanese, what they did to POW's was out and out torture and murder.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kabor
For your father passing only days after the anniversary of your uncle’s death, certainly is very curious, it must have been incredibly hard on him. The anniversaries become any less painful with time.
I kept the details of my Uncle John from my dad as he was in his 80's and didn't need any more grief.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kabor
For the families of the FEPOWs that never made it home, so many like yours waited for years to find out what truly happened to their loved one, details being inaccurate and very difficult to substantiate due to the lack of witnesses left.
The Japanese made sure there wasn't many if any witness's. I still get angry when I think about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kabor
Many were told that they were MIA, and still held out hope for some time after the war that their men were delayed in the ensuing chaos after trying to repatriate the soldiers. I wonder how many families left a light on or lit a candle in a window like your Grandmother; I have heard a number of others doing the same.
My family thought that he might be alive and living in Australia, my Granddad and Grandmother took that hope to their graves. In a way I am glad they never learned the whole truth. When I was in Singapore I found his name on the wall at Kranji, took a few photo's and sent them home. They at least had some closure that they finally knew he wasn't coming home.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kabor
Others were told, like your family, that their men had died of malaria... it was the most common cause of death given by the Japs regardless of what had actually happened and to cover up massacres and executions. Of course, malaria was extremely widespread and the lack of medical supplies would indeed lead to the loss of many.
I worked with a chap many years ago who was a POW of the Japanese, he was forever ill and died far too soon due to the treatment handed out to him. He was a really nice chap, it was such a shame he died so young

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kabor
It is almost beyond comprehension today, the sheer size of the Second World War, the devastation felt by so many millions over all continents. It must never be forgotten.

Out of the 2434 prisoners incarcerated at Sandakan, 1787 were Australian and 641 were British. And as you say, only 6 Australians survived because they escaped and were helped by the locals. Absolutely truly shocking and tragic.
What angers me greatly, the Japanese have never apologised for their actions, they even deny their vicious treatment of POW's. Schools in Japan are never taught what their forefathers did during WW2 and before that in China. I find it disgusting. Leonard Cheshire VC was an observer to one of the Atom bombs drops, while on a visit to Japan a journalist asked him how it feels to be a war criminal. If I had been Cheshire I would have beat the living crap out of him and reminded of the Japanese atrocities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kabor
Brit, have you read Lynette Silver’s ‘Sandakan, Conspiracy of Silence’? She is quite approachable and very knowledgeable – maybe she might be able to help work out more the location of your uncle’s death with the date that you have?

http://sandakan-deathmarch.com/

http://lynettesilver.com/

And a link to more of the Japanese War Atrocities for those who are less aware and interested to learn more:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...war_atrocities
I cannot remember if I have read Lynette Silver’s ‘Sandakan, Conspiracy of Silence. My uncle is just one of many who is buried somewhere along the route of the death march, I think finding an actual location of where he is would be impossible.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kabor
Regarding the location of RAF Jurong, yes, I saw that from the site that attempts were being made to give the exact location of the station, would this be what you thought to? I tried looking at some maps from Singapore online but it is very difficult to work out. If I come across anything meaningful, I shall certainly send on to you. On one site, they indicate that it was very close to the Jurong Bird Park? It must be on RAF archives I guess.

A cheeky favour, but would you be able to ask the RAF Jurong forum if any there remember any more details about the exhumation from 1967 and if they would be willing to speak to me? I will see if I can find anything more out too from other organisations and let you know what I find.
The owner of the site is a very good mate of mine, I've only just found out only ex Jurong personal can be members. I'll ask him if he would allow you to post as a temporary member.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kabor
Many thanks Brit and my very best wishes to you and yours
Thank you and the same to you. It was my pleasure to help where I could.
July 15th, 2012  
viper2007
 
 
It must be painful, Opa Brit, to have to go through what you did. Even if one day, you find it right to forgive the people who did what they did to your family, you will not forget, I can only deduce?

Just to get my bearings right, Opa Brit, was it suppose to be a hush-hush thingy? That station, I mean...

I tried, without much success, to try to use to locate Radio Malaya, then I thought I could pin point the location, didn't do much success there...

That BBC transmission relay station in Kranji was set up after the way, right?
July 15th, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
It must be painful, Opa Brit, to have to go through what you did. Even if one day, you find it right to forgive the people who did what they did to your family, you will not forget, I can only deduce?
I didn't actually go through anything Viper, it was the poor buggers who were POW's went through hell. I will never forgive the Japanese for what they did, even though I didn't actually know my Uncle John. I saw what it did to my Granddad and Granny, it tore them apart.

Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
Just to get my bearings right, Opa Brit, was it suppose to be a hush-hush thingy? That station, I mean...
I don't think the station was supposed to be hush hush as there were Singaporeans actually living on the aerial farm as well as Cable and Wireless civi employees living in Married Quarters on the station.

Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
I tried, without much success, to try to use to locate Radio Malaya, then I thought I could pin point the location, didn't do much success there...
I did have a road map from Singapore from when I was there, but over the years its got lost.

Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
That BBC transmission relay station in Kranji was set up after the way, right?
I didn't know there was a relay station at Kranji, that's news to me, unless you are talking about Amoy Quee . However, there was a sub station to Jurong at Chin Bee (just down the road), firstly run by Royal Signals blokes, then taken over by the RAF.
July 16th, 2012  
viper2007
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
I did have a road map from Singapore from when I was there, but over the years its got lost.



I didn't know there was a relay station at Kranji, that's news to me, unless you are talking about Amoy Quee . However, there was a sub station to Jurong at Chin Bee (just down the road), firstly run by Royal Signals blokes, then taken over by the RAF.
There were some talk that it was in teh area near the now presetn Singapore Discovery Centre. Becasue the location is going through some development, it is pretty tough to pin the exact location.

There is a BBC transmitting station in Kranji. It would seem that it was built after the war...

The one in Chin Bee is long gone, Opa...

I still owe you one thing, Opa Brit, just have not the time to do it- just be patient, dear friend...
July 16th, 2012  
viper2007
 
 
Got some updated news on the location of RAF Jurong, guys.

http://goodmorningyesterday.blogspot...ing-2-saf.html

This particular article mentioned that the RAF Jurong premise were taken over by the 3rd Signal Battalion of the SAF. It is belive to be the site of the present Singapore Discovery Centre...
July 16th, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
There were some talk that it was in teh area near the now presetn Singapore Discovery Centre. Becasue the location is going through some development, it is pretty tough to pin the exact location.
What a pity we didn't have GPS back then. Jurong was an exceptional station, it was huge as far as the aerial farm was concerned, but tiny regarding personnel. The food and the accommodation were brilliant. I did a lot of favours for the cooks, and in return I got quite a few steak dinners. lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
There is a BBC transmitting station in Kranji. It would seem that it was built after the war...
I never knew that, just goes to show how much I don't know lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
The one in Chin Bee is long gone, Opa...
That's a shame, but we cannot stay in the past. I remember during one monsoon, Chin Bee was cut off, we had to borrowed a rubber dingy from the fire section to change the shifts. It was hilarious. Ah wonderful memories.

Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
I still owe you one thing, Opa Brit, just have not the time to do it- just be patient, dear friend...
Thank you Viper, I know you are busy I would be very grateful when you can do it, but please there is no rush. Thank you again for your kindness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by viper2007
Got some updated news on the location of RAF Jurong, guys.

http://goodmorningyesterday.blogspot...ing-2-saf.html

This particular article mentioned that the RAF Jurong premise were taken over by the 3rd Signal Battalion of the SAF. It is belive to be the site of the present Singapore Discovery Centre...
Thanks Viper that's brilliant. I wonder who took over my room??? lol