Question on Joining the USMC




 
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June 22nd, 2010  
Sarlowbat
 

Topic: Question on Joining the USMC


Hey there,

I'm 23 right now and will be graduating from College very soon with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. I'm really interested in doing a 4 year run in the USMC after I'm done with my education stuff.

My question originates with the fact that when I was 9 years old I began seeing a counselor after my parents broke up. From the ages of 9 to 15 I was in and out of therapy sessions. I was never prescribed psych meds for my situation.

Will this be a hindrance in any way? I've been a straight A student the whole time in college, a member of multiple clubs etc etc. Based on my current lifestyle it is apparent that I was simply a boob as a young man. I'm curious as to whether or not I should even try enlisting, as I am not sure that I could get a waiver for that history.
June 22nd, 2010  
A Can of Man
 
 
I don't think it should be a problem.
A kid's parents go through a divorce. The kid seeks therapy. Sounds pretty normal to me.
June 22nd, 2010  
AZ_Infantry
 
 
Nope. Not an issue. As the member above stated, kids often have counseling after divorce. The military is looking for those issues that can return and affect your military service, which a parental breakup at 9 years old isn't likely to (unless there is more there, of course).

Counseling and things of its nature are usually only problematic to enlistment when long-term prescription medication has been a significant portion of whatever the individual was attempting to cope with at the time. So if you are 23 and on Xanex from the divorce at 9, then, yeah... you're not going to be very desired as far as military service goes. You are, to be brunt, unstable without the medication. Medication isn't always available in combat, so the military doesn't allow medication-reliant people to join.

You were specific that no psych medication was prescribed, so the above situation doesn't apply to you.

You, sir, are good to go! Thanks for wanting to serve your nation. That makes you the 1 of every 1,000 college pukes. The rest chase money alone.
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June 24th, 2010  
MikeP
 
 
Good luck to you in your endeavor.
June 29th, 2010  
Big_Z
 
 
I wouldn't even mention it. It's none of thier bussiness.
June 30th, 2010  
MikeP
 
 
I would not take that advice to the bank.

Answer any and all questions truthfully.

If you get investigated for a security clearance, whatever it will be discovered.

What they will hold against you would be a lie or omission.
July 4th, 2010  
Armywm
 
 
It is my understanding that they cannot even ask you about any medical history before turning 18 years old. My oldest son had a medical issue at 15 that was resolved and it was never mentioned by anyone.
July 4th, 2010  
AZ_Infantry
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armywm
It is my understanding that they cannot even ask you about any medical history before turning 18 years old. My oldest son had a medical issue at 15 that was resolved and it was never mentioned by anyone.
Your understanding is wrong on all accounts.
July 4th, 2010  
Armywm
 
 
Ok, well when we went to the recruiter prior medical history was never asked for. Maybe that was just in our situation. Not to be picky but your answer was a little abrupt. Do you have a specific reg that states something about this? I would like to look it up for future reference. Thank you
July 4th, 2010  
AZ_Infantry
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armywm
Ok, well when we went to the recruiter prior medical history was never asked for. Maybe that was just in our situation. Not to be picky but your answer was a little abrupt. Do you have a specific reg that states something about this? I would like to look it up for future reference. Thank you
I don't have a regulation, and I apologize for that. But medical screening is conducted from the 13th birthday on, with an actual "look see" at ALL retained records, which go from birth.

Here's a link that somewhat explains it:

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/joini...mepsglance.htm



Think of it this way:

When your boy joined, their immediate notations were from his most prevalent records, which obviously indicates you changed his doctor at 15. So they used THAT series of records to judge his health on, as that series would have reflected all of the previous records, as well. His doctor at 15 would have incorporated all of your son's notes from all of his previous medical records.

It wasn't asked for because it was already there, incorporated into the most recent file for his PCP.

But that does not mean they don't care what illnesses he's had in life prior to 15. Nor does it mean they don't do a 100% complete medical history review from birth on.

All it means is that at age 13, a child's records are consolidated.

Had you changed his doctor at 17, they'd have had used those records. Or if he joined at 25 with a new PCP at 24.

A little more clear?
 


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