A question about rank - Page 3




 
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August 11th, 2014  
Kesse81
 
Thanks m8
Always wondered why I´ve never met a U.S. Army Corporal.
August 11th, 2014  
The Highway Man
 
The Corporal is the backbone of the British Army.
August 12th, 2014  
Kesse81
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Highway Man
The Corporal is the backbone of the British Army.
The British NCO's are probably the best trained. I´ve learned a lot of things after having been deployed with the British Army.

I once met a British veteran who had been in The Grenadier Guards back in the seventies. Two people he remembered and hated to this day. His Sergeant Major and his Corporal as he described respectively as a hysterical homosexual and a little Nazi
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August 12th, 2014  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Highway Man
The Corporal is the backbone of the British Army.
Now that I agree with 1000000%

Quote:
Originally Posted by brinktk
Usually the Army only promotes someone to corporal in what is called a lateral promotion from specialist to corporal. There may be any number of reasons that they are made a corporal as opposed to a SGT such as; doesn't meet time in grade or time in service requirements, there aren't enough SGT's in a unit and they need to quickly fill an NCO billet without going through the administrative red tape and timeline to promote them to SGT, or it could just be to give a soldier some leadership experience before they are groomed to be promoted.

In the US Army, SGT's are generally the first line supervisors of soldiers down at the team level...Specialists are simply proficient lower enlisted in their MOS and basic soldier skills. Corporals are used to fill a gap if it is needed between the two...but most the time if that gap exists then the squad leader or platoon sergeant simply puts a specialist in that first line supervisor position, and after a time to prove themselves, send them to the board to get promoted without the formality of making them a corporal because the pay is exactly the same.
In the British Army (or it was when I was there) full corporals (as opposed to lance corporals) are usually section commanders, with Lance Corporals as 2 i/c. As The Highway man quite rightly stated corporals are the backbone of the British Army.
August 12th, 2014  
Kesse81
 
Officers administrate the Army, NCOs run it
August 20th, 2014  
Remington 1858
 
 
On my very first day in the U.S. Army, or possibly it was the second day, in Reception Company , a place where not much happens, strictly an administrative company where new recruits get their physical exams, shots, paperwork, before going to a basic training company, a Corporal entered the barracks. A Corporal, even then was a rare rank in the U.S. Army and this gentleman had an Irish Brogue accent that said that he had recently gotten off the boat from the Emerald Isle, Possibly a former member of HM Forces. This worthy informed us new recruits that our latrine looked like a sh**house. Some wiseacre spouted off that that was the exact purpose of the room. I recall that the Hibernian Corp smacked the individual in the nose and sent him to clean said chamber.
August 21st, 2014  
The Highway Man
 
I've served with some excellent Irish lads.
August 21st, 2014  
BritinAfrica
 
 
I remember a Southern Irish bloke during basic training in the RAF, he said once "Oi moight be Irish, but I aint tick." Translation "I might be Irish but I'm not thick."

During an exercise in Germany in 1980 I was tasked to supply a Scottish Regiment with my section. On arrival I asked a bloke where the CP was, he replied "grunt grunt grunt, grunt Jimmy." Translation, I have no idea what he said, I only speak English.
August 23rd, 2014  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
I remember a Southern Irish bloke during basic training in the RAF, he said once "Oi moight be Irish, but I aint tick." Translation "I might be Irish but I'm not thick."

During an exercise in Germany in 1980 I was tasked to supply a Scottish Regiment with my section. On arrival I asked a bloke where the CP was, he replied "grunt grunt grunt, grunt Jimmy." Translation, I have no idea what he said, I only speak English.
There is a scientific explanation for this.

Once upon the time; the Scottish and the Irish spoke a comprehensive language. The Scots and the Irish were in the forefront of the civilization. Then according to Professor Who Havenoclue, from the University of Macallan something dramatic occurred in Scotland and in Ireland. The introduction of whisky changed the societies profoundly. There is a strong evidence of this still, when Scottish males are wearing skirts and cannot see the issues with doing so. The other strong evidence is how the implementation of scotch had on the society when it changed what once was the English language. The Irish followed the same pattern of transformation as a result of the structural change of the society. However, the change was not so dramatic in Ireland when the dress codes never changed, but it was rather close.


W. Havenoclue “Scotland and Ireland; what went wrong?”, The Journal of Drinking, vol. 6. no 4, 2014 pp. 213-218
August 24th, 2014  
Hutchie
 
When I was in the US Army 1971-1974, if they needed someone to have the responsibility of a SGT without paying them for it, they would give you the stripes, but you would get paid E4 pay. I was an acting SGT for a year, but the Army wanted me to re-up for 3 years to get the pay. A corporal can give a lawful order, a specialist can't , even Spec 5 or higher. I could as an "acting jack" if I had too. I was the head of camp security in Korea. After 5pm, if I was on duty, I was acting camp commander, as the CO lived off base. Pretty good job for an E4.
 


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