POW Camps in USA




 
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December 28th, 2004  
Missileer
 
 

Topic: POW Camps in USA


I wonder if anyone here knows of or lives close to a POW camp where German POWs were interned. I pass by one in a small town here in Texas on my way to work every day. It is located close to a small town, Princeton, which was pretty isolated during WW II. I have watched some of the programs on the History channel and it seems that our own soldiers who came home on leave or because of wounds were upset because the POWs were allowed to work on nearby farms for pay. One Marine was pretty bitter about the POWs being allowed to go to town under guard and spend their money on things that he couldn't afford.

I know that most POW camps were located in Texas and Arizona in areas that would be harder to escape from but there were few escapes because they were treated pretty good. Where were the Japanese POWs interned?
I have read that not many Japanese surrendered so there weren`t as many to imprison.
December 28th, 2004  
The Grill Instructor
 
Who´s interested in that topic can find a list at http://home.arcor.de/kriegsgefangene.../standort.html

This list is also available in german language. I found that in my favorites. Should be an almost complete list of POW camps in the US.

The list of camps in Europe is defenately useless since lots of camps are not listed.

T.G.I.
December 28th, 2004  
Big_Z
 
 
Yea the Germans were treated like VIP's, America hoped Germany would follow our lead and do the same with American POW's. Allot of the Germans did not want to leave and right after they were sent home they came right back to America. We had Japanese camps as well but they were American Japanese. I'm not sure if you have seen some of the video clips but the Japanese would rather jump off of cliffs then surrender.
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December 28th, 2004  
Missileer
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Grill Instructor
Who´s interested in that topic can find a list at http://home.arcor.de/kriegsgefangene.../standort.html

This list is also available in german language. I found that in my favorites. Should be an almost complete list of POW camps in the US.

The list of camps in Europe is defenately useless since lots of camps are not listed.

T.G.I.
Thanks GrillInstructer, I may have one city that I can add to his list. I saw a lot of towns around me but not the one I was speaking of. I think this sign pointing to the camp has only been up for about a year so it may not be on his list. I'll stop by and check out the name and send it to him.
December 29th, 2004  
Turner
 
Well the germans Pow camps were perty bad for the allias because there tried to espace there were probly shot on site but in ares Pow camps we cound't have just shot them on site
December 29th, 2004  
AussieNick
 
If you look at Japanese POW camps in WW2 they make German POW camps for allied Brits/US/Aussies were rather luxurious.

I won't go into too much detail, but look at the examples of Changi prison and the forced work on the Burma Railway, thousands of Australians and Brits died at the hands of their Japanese captors. and as for shooting on sight, try the example of when the Japanese took the island of New Britain off the coast of PNG. They captured a regiment of 1000 Australian soldiers, and on the first day they tied 160 of them to trees and used them as live bayonet practice (plus other beheadings and shootings). Absolutley and horribly brutal. Understandably there were only a couple of survivors of the New Britain massacres. At least during the second world war, on the whole, the Nazis were to some degree gentlemanly about taking prisoners of war (western allies anyway).
December 30th, 2004  
r031Button
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AussieNick
If you look at Japanese POW camps in WW2 they make German POW camps for allied Brits/US/Aussies were rather luxurious.

I won't go into too much detail, but look at the examples of Changi prison and the forced work on the Burma Railway, thousands of Australians and Brits died at the hands of their Japanese captors. and as for shooting on sight, try the example of when the Japanese took the island of New Britain off the coast of PNG. They captured a regiment of 1000 Australian soldiers, and on the first day they tied 160 of them to trees and used them as live bayonet practice (plus other beheadings and shootings). Absolutley and horribly brutal. Understandably there were only a couple of survivors of the New Britain massacres. At least during the second world war, on the whole, the Nazis were to some degree gentlemanly about taking prisoners of war (western allies anyway).
Out of the 134 Royal Winnipeg Grenadiers capture at Hong Kong in WW2, 16 survived
December 30th, 2004  
AussieNick
 
Incredible cruelty in those POW camps, if they were lucky enough to be taken to a POW camp and not get killed outright. I forgot the Canadians were in Singapore as well.
January 3rd, 2005  
ltdave
 
there was a POW camp at Camp Beale in california (now Beale AFB). the camp trained tank crews, the 81th inf and the 96th inf....

there was a POW camp at Camp Perry in Ohio, Fort Custer, Michigan, and i think there was one at Camp Grayling in michigan...

david
January 3rd, 2005  
Damien435
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AussieNick
At least during the second world war, on the whole, the Nazis were to some degree gentlemanly about taking prisoners of war (western allies anyway).
That is a great point. In German POW camps in WWII American troops were treated better than any other countries troops because the Germans had the most respect for America's power over that of any other nation. Russian troops were treated terribly, forced into slave labor and given terrible barracks to live in. But then again look at how German POW's in America were treated compared to German POW's in Russia, perhaps there was something to this theory of if we are nice to their troops they will be nice to ours. Or such is my understanding of how things were.