Polish Army Photos - Page 13




 
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July 15th, 2007  
The Other Guy
 
 
These pictures are great.

Make me proud of my heritage.
July 15th, 2007  
Venom PL
 
 
I am glad you like it guys.

The Other Guy could you tell something more about your Polish roots ?
July 15th, 2007  
The Other Guy
 
 
My dad's side of the family was from eastern Poland, the area that had before WWI been part of Germany. My great grandparents (on my Grandmother's side) came to the US via Ellis Island in about 1910. My great grandparents on my grandfather's side of the family came over in the late 20s, but in 1938 they returned because my Great Grandfather missed working with the farm animals (the farm would not have a tractor until about 1970).

When the war broke out, there was no real fighting in that area, the Germans quickly overrunning the Polish Positions in their area. Shortly after the start of Operation Barbarossa later all jewish residents of the town were rounded up and taken away by Ukranian Sodiers fighting for the Germans. None of them were ever seen again. When the war broke out, my grandfather was 14.

In 1943 my great grandfather (who was quite the rebel) was trying to organze the farmers in the area to slow grain production to the germans. A short time later the Gestapo showed up at his house, put a gun to his head, and "interrogated" him. They said if grain hold ups continued they would be back. They left. My great grandfather snorted, spat where they had been standing, and the grain hold ups continued. However, the Gestapo never returned.

In 1944 as the Russians came through there was some intense fighting in the area. At one point a battle broke out as my great grandmother was milking the cow. When the shooting began, she dove under a hay cart. My great grandfather, saw her, ran out to the haycart, picked her up, and carried her back to the house. Neither of them were hurt. My great grandfather then went up into the attic of their house to smoke, and unknown to him a hole had been blown into the roof by an artillery shell. When he stood up in the attic he was mistaken for a sniper and shot in the head. He died almost immediately.

After the war ended, my grandfather (who had a relative still in Cleveland, where they had settled before the war) left Poland and moved to the US. He married my Grandmother sometime in the late '40s.

My Grandfather died of a massive Heart Attack in 1994. My Grandmother died last summer at the age of 92. No member of my family has been to Poland since 1974, when my dad went with my Grandparents..

Oh, and my great uncle (who remained in Poland after the war) was a member of the Polish Resistance. Apparently after blowing up a bridge he came back with a cape tied on him by a couple of friends. There were bullet holes in the cape, but he was unscathed.

That's about it, that I can think of now.
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July 26th, 2007  
Venom PL
 
 
Soldiers from 18th Air Assault Battalion and 17th Mechanized Brigade are showing how to shoot.

Originally posted and translated by Jocker_89

Quote:
For soldiers mission in Afghanistan is a test of character.
They must deal with serious tasks, with hard climate...with oneself.

But when we are looking at Polish soldiers from combat group A in Ghazni,
We may see that they go out from this encounters victorious.

Typical soldiers' morning - bathroom, breakfast and some soldiers are running few kilometers.
Commander of the group major Michał Hołub is on two-day patrol with the convoy.
In staff, at coffee, among monitors, phones and maps, his substitute captain Mariusz Krawiec shortly says what is in work schedule for today - Shooting, return of convoy, unloading transport, patrol in day and in night,
In the morning and in the evening briefing, guards. there is a lot of work to do – he adds with smile.

And really there is a lot of work to do. From the morning on target range soldiers from 18th Air Assault Battalion and 17th Mechanized Brigade are training shooting from different positions - lying, standing, kneeling .

In another part of the base soldiers are unloading transport trucks.

Evening is approaching Hummers and Rosomaks (wolverines) are leaving on a patrol.
Next day: I know, that all have returned from patrol because they told us how it was.*

Major Wojciech KALISZCZAK














July 26th, 2007  
Venom PL
 
 














July 26th, 2007  
Maytime
 
 
I love that HMMWV pic, looks like it's shooting frickin' laser beams!
July 28th, 2007  
Venom PL
 
 
This time two nice movies

Medieval helpdesk


Medieval helpdesk


In this one you may get familiar with the Polish military oath (subtitles)in English

....and one pic from A-stan

Originalyy posted by Tank a lot



Quote:
Polish armored vehicles patrol on the outskirts of Ghazni city, southern Afghanistan, Friday, July 27, 2007. The Taliban on Friday has once again extended the deadline for executing South Korean hostages, governor of Ghazni province in central Afghanistan said. (Zabi Tamanna/Xinhua/WpN)
July 28th, 2007  
Regisvo
 
 
Poor South Korean hostages. They need rescue.
July 28th, 2007  
Fox
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Other Guy
My dad's side of the family was from eastern Poland, the area that had before WWI been part of Germany. My great grandparents (on my Grandmother's side) came to the US via Ellis Island in about 1910. My great grandparents on my grandfather's side of the family came over in the late 20s, but in 1938 they returned because my Great Grandfather missed working with the farm animals (the farm would not have a tractor until about 1970).

When the war broke out, there was no real fighting in that area, the Germans quickly overrunning the Polish Positions in their area. Shortly after the start of Operation Barbarossa later all jewish residents of the town were rounded up and taken away by Ukranian Sodiers fighting for the Germans. None of them were ever seen again. When the war broke out, my grandfather was 14.

In 1943 my great grandfather (who was quite the rebel) was trying to organze the farmers in the area to slow grain production to the germans. A short time later the Gestapo showed up at his house, put a gun to his head, and "interrogated" him. They said if grain hold ups continued they would be back. They left. My great grandfather snorted, spat where they had been standing, and the grain hold ups continued. However, the Gestapo never returned.

In 1944 as the Russians came through there was some intense fighting in the area. At one point a battle broke out as my great grandmother was milking the cow. When the shooting began, she dove under a hay cart. My great grandfather, saw her, ran out to the haycart, picked her up, and carried her back to the house. Neither of them were hurt. My great grandfather then went up into the attic of their house to smoke, and unknown to him a hole had been blown into the roof by an artillery shell. When he stood up in the attic he was mistaken for a sniper and shot in the head. He died almost immediately.

After the war ended, my grandfather (who had a relative still in Cleveland, where they had settled before the war) left Poland and moved to the US. He married my Grandmother sometime in the late '40s.

My Grandfather died of a massive Heart Attack in 1994. My Grandmother died last summer at the age of 92. No member of my family has been to Poland since 1974, when my dad went with my Grandparents..

Oh, and my great uncle (who remained in Poland after the war) was a member of the Polish Resistance. Apparently after blowing up a bridge he came back with a cape tied on him by a couple of friends. There were bullet holes in the cape, but he was unscathed.

That's about it, that I can think of now.
Dude, that is an interesting story. I enjoyed it. Thanks for the sharing. Sorry about your great-grandfather and your grandparents.

Regisvo, please explain why South Korea needs a rescue? They aren't under control by Communism government. We have a member that is from South Korea. He was in ROK Marine Corps.
July 28th, 2007  
Regisvo
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Venom PL
Polish armored vehicles patrol on the outskirts of Ghazni city, southern Afghanistan, Friday, July 27, 2007. The Taliban on Friday has once again extended the deadline for executing South Korean hostages, governor of Ghazni province in central Afghanistan said. (Zabi Tamanna/Xinhua/WpN)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fox
Regisvo, please explain why South Korea needs a rescue? They aren't under control by Communism government. We have a member that is from South Korea. He was in ROK Marine Corps.

Quote:
South Koreans Kidnapped in Afghanistan

By FISNIK ABRASHI
The Associated Press
July 20, 2007

Taliban militants threatened Friday to kill a group of abducted South Korean Christians, including 15 women, within 24 hours unless the Asian nation withdraws its 200 troops from Afghanistan. South Korea said Saturday it plans to withdraw its forces by the end of this year as scheduled.


...
http://www.topix.net/content/ap/2007...-afghanistan-2