Pics of me on the NJROTC trip to Corpus Christie - Page 3




 
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Boots
 
March 24th, 2006  
Missileer
 
 
Keep him squared away, Fox. That was a nice tour.
March 27th, 2006  
PJ24
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marinerhodes
Notice the trainer planes say MARINES on the fuselage (or whatever it is called)...coincidence? I think not ! *grins evilly*
If you look inside, the Marine version of the Goshawk has color coded flight controls made by Fisher-Price.

Looks like you boys had fun, kudos to your JROTC program for getting you guys involved.
April 2nd, 2006  
AJChenMPH
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Navy Boy
O.k. we are now on the naval air base and we are now learning aviation class (I didn't really like the class because I couldn't be a jet pilot anyway because I wear glasses and you can't wear glasses when piloting a jet because the Gforces will crash my glasses and well there goes my good pair of glasses.
You can't be a Naval Aviator, but you can be a Naval Flight Officer with glasses. Just means you'd sit in the back seat of an F/A-18F and play with all the electronics. I almost went that route myself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Navy Boy
This naval airplane has got to be a trainer one.
Yep, if you look at the sign in the pic, I think that says "T-34B Mentor". The Navy now uses the T-34C Turbo Mentor -- but basically, it's the primary fixed-wing trainer for the Navy. I got a hop in the T-34C back in JAN 1993 when I was a Navy ROTC MIDN and went on my own field trip to NAS Pensacola (flew with VT-6 "Shooters" out of NAS Whiting Field). Too bad the pics I have are all hard-copy -- time to find a scanner.
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Boots
April 2nd, 2006  
tomtom22
 
 
Nice!
April 4th, 2006  
Navy Boy
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJChenMPH
You can't be a Naval Aviator, but you can be a Naval Flight Officer with glasses. Just means you'd sit in the back seat of an F/A-18F and play with all the electronics. I almost went that route myself.


Yep, if you look at the sign in the pic, I think that says "T-34B Mentor". The Navy now uses the T-34C Turbo Mentor -- but basically, it's the primary fixed-wing trainer for the Navy. I got a hop in the T-34C back in JAN 1993 when I was a Navy ROTC MIDN and went on my own field trip to NAS Pensacola (flew with VT-6 "Shooters" out of NAS Whiting Field). Too bad the pics I have are all hard-copy -- time to find a scanner.
So what your saying is that I can't be a helicopter pilot?
April 6th, 2006  
AJChenMPH
 
 
I think being a helicopter pilot is the one Naval Aviator billet that you can apply for with glasses; maybe also the P-3 Orion. As always, double-check with a recruiter.

Oh yeah, I'm surprised no one else pointed this out: it's NAS Corpus Christi, not NAS Corpus Christie.
April 6th, 2006  
Navy Boy
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJChenMPH
I think being a helicopter pilot is the one Naval Aviator billet that you can apply for with glasses; maybe also the P-3 Orion. As always, double-check with a recruiter.
Oooooh I TOLD YOU FOX!
April 6th, 2006  
AJChenMPH
 
 
Hey, like I said, check with a recruiter. I'm not 100% sure on that.
April 6th, 2006  
PJ24
 
 
Here's what I found about vision requirements for Navy pilots (excuse me, Naval aviators ):

Quote:
The Navy and the Marine Corps use the same standards (The Marines do not have their own medical department. They use the Navy for all medical procedures and standards). Navy Pilots must pass a Class I Flying Physical. To become a pilot in the Navy or Marine Corps, an applicant's uncorrected vision can be no worse than 20/40 (correctable to 20/20) in each eye. Once flight training begins, vision can deteriorate to no worse than 20/100 (correctable to 20/20) in each eye. After flight training graduation, if the eyesite deteriorates worse than 20/200 (must be correctable to 20/20), the pilot will require a waiver for carrier operations. If the vision deteriorates past 20/400 (correctable to 20/20), the pilot is restricted to aircraft with dual controls (ie, aircraft with co-pilots).



http://www.nomi.med.navy.mil/Nami/Wa...thalmology.htm
Quote:
Consider whether a waiver is actually required. For all three Service Groups, unaided visual acuity requirements are now the same; aviators are required to have 20/400 vision or better in each eye. An aviator whose vision is worse than 20/400 will need a waiver to fly in any Service Group; clear justification is required, including primary type of aircraft in which he or she will be flying and the number of hours in that type of aircraft. Remind your aviators that SG3 Pilot in Command waivers are addressed to CNO (N889) and are valid only for the current command. Refer to OPNAVINST 3710.7 Chapter 8 Section 5 for further details.
April 6th, 2006  
Fox
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Navy Boy
Oooooh I TOLD YOU FOX!
Wait and see what AJChenMPH checking with the recruiter. Or Navy boy, you can ask the recruiter.