The Odd And Unusual In The Military - Page 5




 
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Boots
 
April 7th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Nope and you're cold as the Yukon now.

I'll give you guys until the end of the weekend to figure this one out and then I'll move on to another question.
April 11th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Okay, nobody got this one. So here's the answer:

The country was Imperial Germany. The provocation was the US presence in the Phillipines at the time of the Spanish-American War. The Kaiser had had his eye on Phillipines himself at that time and had been building up his naval forces in China to be able to conquer the Phillipines. When Commodore Dewey defeated the Spanish at Manila, the Kaiser was enraged and sent a task force to Manila in response. Dewey faced them down. Though the Germans had larger more powerful ships in greater numbers, he didn't blink - they did and backed down. This only enraged the Kaiser further and he had his General Staff draw up war plans for the conquest of America. By 1900 the plans were in place and forces were being prepared. The Kaiser vascilated on this from that point until about 1904 when his eye turned to Britain and the naval arms race with that nation that led to WWI. Many feel that only the Kaiser's inability to stay focused saved the US from conquest. This inability was a symptom of his health problems. Germany most certainly would've conquered us if they had attacked at that time. We had no large Army and our Navy was still quite small then. Mass attacks on New York City, Washington, D.C., and Atlanta as the Kaiser's war plan called for would've succeeded.

Okay, here's an easier question for the next one.

The US military was segregated until July 26, 1948 when President Harry Truman issued Executive Order 9981. The order brought an end to racial segregation within the ranks of the United States military forces. Before that, it was considered a great stride just for non-whites to be allowed to fight for their country at all. Many of you have seen the movie "Glory" which illustrates just that occurance. For 400 milbucks name the first non-white unit in the US military.
April 11th, 2005  
Tibs
 
1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry?
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Boots
April 11th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Incorrect.
April 16th, 2005  
Tibs
 
You're gonna' give us a new question on Monday, right?
April 16th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
It's not that hard a question. Apply yourself.
April 18th, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
Louisana Native Guards- Mustered into the Union Army May 27 1863 at Port Hudson La.

Or......................

1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry- Organized August 1862 at Fort Scott Ks. First Black troops to engage Confederate Forces. Mustered into Union Service May 18th 1863 redesignated as the 79th United States Colored Infantry.
April 19th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Nice tries, but incorrect.

A hint: The unit was formed even earlier than those. Remember this part of the question, "first non-white unit".
April 19th, 2005  
Duty Honor Country
 
 
I know the answer comes from the Revolutionary War. I know the British started to enlist backs to fight and then the Americans followed suit.

is it the First Rhode Island Regiment?

It has been a while Charge. I got job evaluations coming up, so I will be limited until after the 1st week of May
April 19th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Correct! You get the 400 milbucks. Good job, Doody!

The 1st Rhode Island Regiment was formed in 1778 composed of 3/4 blacks and 1/4 Native Americans. It was the first non-white unit in US history. Within three months of their forming they were thrown into battle against trained professional European troops of the Anspach Regiment, a Hessian unit serving the British. Outnumbered five to one, amid three attempts to break their line and in spite of cannonade from British ships in the bay; these troops held their ground. American General Sullivan wrote that these troops under Col. Christopher Greene displayed "desperate valor" in repulsing the british. In fact, the Hessian commander refused a fourth attempt to break their line fearing he would sustain too great a loss with such an attempt. The British finally withdrew and returned to Newport.

The 1st Rhode Island served with distinction in every major engagement, not for 90 days as most regiments, but for five years. They were present at Yorktown for the British surrender. Discharged at West Point in 1783 with only promises of pay and freedom, they returned to Rhode Island only to find destitution and slavery once again; soon forgotten and un-remembered.


Next question:

In 1846 in the southern US a schoolteacher died in relative anonymity. In reality, as much historical evidence suggests, he was a very famous warrior indeed. Who was he? The correct answer will get you 400 milbucks.