The Odd And Unusual In The Military - Page 3




 
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Boots
 
March 13th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Okay since nobody's gone anywhere with this for several days, here's a big hint:

Civil War admirals, Rear Admiral David Porter's biological father, and Admiral David Farragutt's adoptive father, was Captain David Porter of the War of 1812 who was the commanding officer that placed the Marine in command of the prize crew.

I'm betting Doody gets this now.
March 23rd, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
The British Whaler Greenwich. Captured by Porter while in command of Essex. Porter placed Lieutenant John Marshall Gamble USMC in command of Greenwich.

Gamble while in command also captured the 14 gun British Vessel Seringpatam.

Porter later commanded Greenwich after the Essex was taken by the British.
March 23rd, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Good job, 03! I was hoping you might be reading these.

Here's another Marine Corps history question for you. Let's see if this one isn't too easy for you. I'll make it worth 200 milbucks.

One Marine Corps hero started out WWII with the unlikely job of a bugler. As the Marines call them, a "music". He wanted very much to be a machinegunner but the Corps was short on buglers so a bugler he stayed despite heroic actions on Guadalcanal, and Saipan manning a machinegun. Finally the Corps relented and he was made a sergeant in charge of a machinegun squad in time for Iwo Jima. His men under fire from Japanese gun emplacements, "Fighting Field Music" as he was called by then charged the Japanese with just a .45 and some grenades. He went back to his lines time and time again for more grenades until the gun emplacements fell silent. As he was making his way back to his lines a Japanese grenade took his life and made his Medal of Honor posthumous. Many years later a famous ship would be named in his honor. For the 200 milbucks name the Marine and the ship.
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Boots
March 23rd, 2005  
CDTGaticaW201
 
Oh hey! I know this one!

Sgt. Darrell Cole - USS Cole
March 23rd, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
He beat me too it. Sgt. Darrell S. Cole USMC
March 23rd, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
I guess that one was a bit easy judging from the fast answer, still, excellent work guys. Looks like DlanoeG could use the milbucks too.

Okay here's a harder one.

The Monitor and the Merrimack are often thought of as the birth of ironclad warships. Europeans may argue that the Gloire or the Warrior were the first. For 200 milbucks name the tiny nation that actually was the first and when.
March 23rd, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
Korea 1592 Admiral Yi Sun Sins Kohbudson Turtle Ship Fleet.
March 23rd, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
8 minutes! Excellent work, 03! My hat's off to you. That one wasn't that easy. You've about pulled equal to Doody for taking my money.

Okay here's a hard one for you.

To date, no woman has yet been awarded the Medal of Honor. However, in WWII one woman was awarded America's second highest award, the Distinguished Service Cross (DSC). For 250 milbucks who was she and what did she do?
March 23rd, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
Virginia Hall the " Limping Lady of the OSS"

She infiltrated France and worked with the Resistance. Sending vital intelligence back to Britian. After D -Day when communications were cut. She proved invaluable because of her knowledge of Morse Code.
March 23rd, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Okay, you've passed Doody. I smell a challenge coming up.

Good job! "Dixie" Hall was also awarded by King George VI the MBE. Her exploits were so daring and so valuable that the Gestapo issued a special directive just for her. "The woman who limps is one of the most dangerous Allied agents in France". She was the first woman and the first civilian awarded the DSC - though it could be argued that membership in the OSS (the forerunner of the CIA) made her a combatent and not a civilian.

Continuing the thread of civilians awarded high military awards, very few civilians have ever won the Victoria Cross (VC). One British spy who did so saved a great many lives in his efforts. Who was he and what did he do? The correct answer will get you 200 milbucks.