The Odd And Unusual In The Military - Page 2




 
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Boots
 
February 27th, 2005  
Grimnar
 
 
Jeff Davis?
February 28th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Correct! You get the milbucks. "Traveler" was originally named "Jeff Davis". Obviously it would have been unseemly for the commanding general to have riden a horse named after the President so "Traveler" got rechristened. Good job! For awhile there, I thought that one was going to be too hard.

Next question:

This one is rather hard so I'll bring the milbucks awarded up to 250.

In the early half of the 19th century John Ericsson was fired from the US Navy and if not for the great needs of the Civil War nearly 20 years later, might never have invented the Monitor - the first revolving turreted gunship. Ericsson was fired because he criticized the misuse of ideas originally conceived by him but put in play altered by another man. This lead to a great tragedy that many feel Ericsson was made a scapegoat for. What was the tragedy?
March 1st, 2005  
Grimnar
 
 
Are you talking about the accident on the Princeton?
The cannon that exploded was not of his design I believe.
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Boots
March 1st, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Correct! Very good! You get the money again. It was indeed a tragedy. The US Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Navy were both killed in the explosion as was the Commandant of Annapolis. President Tyler missed being killed only because he was asked a question as he climbed up the ladder to observe the fire and turned back to answer. Correct also that the cannon was not of his design - exactly - it was designed by Commodore Stockton from Ericsson's original design and Ericsson suffered for having been the original holder of the patent and having the temerity to criticize it's modification. he was fired in disgrace and it was only the Civil War that saved him from obscurity.

Next question:

France has one of the most bizarre war monuments in existence - all the more so because it is very real and telling of the tragedy of war. Where is this monument in France and what does it show? The correct answer will get you 200 milbucks.
March 1st, 2005  
Grimnar
 
 
since Im on fire....
I think france have some bizarre monuments, but maybe it could be the skeleton on "mort homme" (dead mans hill)?
March 1st, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
You're in the right area but no cigar.
March 5th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Okay nobody's taken a stab at this lately so I'll give another hint:

The monument is on one of the largest battlefields in France and there is also another hint in the sentence above this one.
March 8th, 2005  
The Other Guy
 
 
An eunormous knife?

Dunno where, but would I get half credit if I am correct?
March 9th, 2005  
Grimnar
 
 
ah.... then it must be the trench of bayonets.
It shows bayonets stuck in the ground. One for each soldier they found I think.
it also shows the power of artillery
March 9th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Correct about the Bayonet Trench. You get the milbucks.

The Bayonet Trench marks the final resting place of No. 3 Company, 1st Battalion, 137th Infantry Regiment of the French Army at Verdun.

In January 1919, a French Army team from the 137th Infantry Regiment, searching a particular part of the part of the battlefield at Verdun for the remains of their comrades who had fallen during the desperate fighting there almost three years earlier, made a startling discovery. L'Abbé Ratier, the regimental chaplain, who had served as a stretcher-bearer during the bloodiest combat, stumbled upon an object protruding from the ground. Looking closer, he saw it was a French bayonet. He noticed another one a few feet away, then another. He counted dozens of bayonets over a distance of 30 yards. Removing the dirt from around one of them, the team found it was fixed to the barrel of a rifle. Digging beneath it, they discovered the decomposed body of a French soldier. Excavating further beneath the other bayonets, they found similar remains. The bombardment of June 12th, 1916 by German artillery had landed on either side of the trench and collapsed the earth in on the men below. The French nation was captivated by this a symbol of all who had stood their ground even against the fiercest odds and a monument was created over the trench where the men still are to this day.

Next question:

The War of 1812 saw many "firsts" in warfare but this question regards the first and only time a ship captured by the US Navy had as commander of its prize crew a US Marine. Name the ship and the Marine for 250 milbucks.