Obliterating Islamic State (ISIS) - Page 42




 
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Boots
 
April 2nd, 2017  
Tuan
 
 
I think there have been some fundamentals raised here, which deserve less dismissal and more introspection. Whether you guys like it or not, the truth is terrorism in most academic circles is associated with primarily political motives of groups. The groups may have religious backing, or ideological, but terrorist organizations are primarily identified as Terrorist when their political aspirations become transparent. Till then they are hardly classified as Terrorist. We can have some arguments for and against this stance, but this is how and why PLO was classified as a Terror Group initially, so was al Qaeda, Babar Khalsa or LeT or LTTE or the dozens we know.

Islamic extremism for one exhorts itself as purely a religious entity, whereas with Sharia as core with its legislative, judiciary, and executive arms (all understood as Political) is basically and primarily more Political in its aims than religious/ideological in most ways.
April 2nd, 2017  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuan
I think there have been some fundamentals raised here, which deserve less dismissal and more introspection. Whether you guys like it or not, the truth is terrorism in most academic circles is associated with primarily political motives of groups. The groups may have religious backing, or ideological, but terrorist organizations are primarily identified as Terrorist when their political aspirations become transparent. Till then they are hardly classified as Terrorist. We can have some arguments for and against this stance, but this is how and why PLO was classified as a Terror Group initially, so was al Qaeda, Babar Khalsa or LeT or LTTE or the dozens we know.

Islamic extremism for one exhorts itself as purely a religious entity, whereas with Sharia as core with its legislative, Judiciary and Executive arms (all understood as Political) is basically and primarily more Political in its aims than religious/cultural in most ways.

I know where you are coming from and the consensus in the perception of terrorism. Most policy makers, political think tanks, scientists, intelligence agencies, and/or law enforcement agencies perceive terrorism as a mix of political/ideological/religious motivated groups. But we must raise the questions if this perception might be wrong, and we should change it to the same perception we have about other organized crimes, the endgame for the organized criminal groups can be different, but is that really relevant?

I mean, how many policy makers, institutes, and other academics care about drug related crimes and the damage it creates to the society and the people exposed to this kind of crimes. Maybe we should leave this to the criminologists (academics, scientists), the law enforcement and the courts.

I have studied political science and conflict studies, the latter is much better to understand terrorism than political scientists. Conflict studies have an emphasis on conflict resolutions and lesser on the crimes committed during the armed conflict. That is the price we have to pay for reaching a peace agreement.

Political science and the scientists within this field don't care much about other crimes, and yet the terrorists get the full attentions. I also have a feeling if we perceive the terrorists as political entities, we somewhat provide them with a recognition of their acts.
April 6th, 2017  
MontyB
 
 
I think the Wests biggest problem is a desire to rationalise our enemies and "understand" their motives which in the case of a conventional opponent both makes sense and is possible however against groups like IS and AQ it is pointless, largely irrelevant and emboldens them by making us look weak and indecisive.

I am convinced there is little to understand with regards to IS/AQ as their motive is simply one
of blind hatred and methodology doesn't extend beyond killing and destruction.
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Boots
April 13th, 2017  
Tuan
 
 
US drops largest non-nuclear bomb in Afghanistan

Quote:
Washington (CNN)The US military has dropped an enormous bomb in Afghanistan, according to four US military officials with direct knowledge of the mission.

A GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb, nicknamed MOAB, was dropped at 7 p.m. local time Thursday, the sources said.

The MOAB is also known as the "mother of all bombs." A MOAB is a 21,600-pound, GPS-guided munition that is America's most powerful non-nuclear bomb.

The bomb was dropped by an MC-130 aircraft, operated by Air Force Special Operations Command, according to the military sources.

They said the target was an ISIS tunnel and cave complex as well as personnel in the Achin district of the Nangarhar province.

The military is currently assessing the damage. Gen. John Nicholson, commander of US forces in Afghanistan, signed off on the use of the bomb, according to the sources. Authority had to be sought from Gen. Joseph Votel, commander of US Central Command.

This is the first time a MOAB has been used in the battlefield, according to the US officials. This munition was developed during the Iraq War.
June 7th, 2017  
Tuan
 
 
At the dawn of a new world order where the leaders of the western liberal democracies including the USA, the UK, Canada, Germany and France announce their vision and mission of the future leadership for the "free world"; Russia, China and India on the other hand compete with each other for sphere of regional and global influence; amid tensions in Korean peninsula, the so-called Islamic State claims that it has found a new target in the Middle East, as its suicide bombers blew themselves up in Tehran, after influencing the UK election by waging two attacks in two weeks. Meanwhile, Iran's Revolutionary Guards accused Saudi Arabia and the US of being behind the attacks. Is this the beginning of a new world order or chaos? Interesting times ahead...

Tehran attackers 'were IS recruits from Iran'

Quote:
Iran says the attackers who killed 12 people in the capital Tehran were Iranians who had joined so-called Islamic State (IS).

Suicide bombers attacked parliament and the mausoleum of the Islamic Republic's founder Ayatollah Khomeini.

All the attackers were killed. Five people believed to be planning a third attack were arrested, officials said.

Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guards accused Saudi Arabia and the US of being behind the attacks.

The violence comes amid heightened tension in the Middle East, with Saudi Arabia and other Arab states cutting ties with Qatar over alleged support for Islamist militants and closer ties with Iran.

Sunni-ruled Saudi Arabia and Shia-majority Iran are staunch regional rivals.
In an interview on state TV, Reza Seifollahi, deputy chief of Iran's Supreme National Security Council, said the attackers "had joined Daesh [IS] from a number of regions inside Iran."

IS earlier claimed the attacks - a first for Iran - and threatened further assaults on Iranian Shia Muslims.

Iran's Revolutionary Guards vowed revenge for the bloodshed, but pointed the finger at the US and Saudi Arabia in the wake of President Donald Trump's recent visit to the kingdom.

"This terrorist action, coming one week after the meeting of the president of the United States with the leader of the one of the region's reactionary governments (Saudi Arabia)... shows they are involved in this savage action," it said in a statement.
The US and Saudi Arabia both condemned the attacks.

US President Donald Trump said he was praying for the victims but added that "states that sponsor terrorism risk falling victim to the evil they promote".

Claiming the attack, IS posted a video which showed what it claimed was footage from inside the parliament building.

A voice is heard saying, in Arabic: "We're not going anywhere. We're staying forever."
BBC Persian's Jenny Norton says that despite Iran's active involvement in fighting IS in both Iraq and Syria, the Sunni group has not until now carried out any attacks inside Iran, and appears to have little support in this predominantly Shia country.

However, our analyst says, in recent months the group has stepped up its Farsi-language propaganda efforts - targeting Iran's restive Sunni minority.
Iranian intelligence agencies claim to have foiled a number of IS-inspired plots.
But by mounting a successful attack, IS could claim a major coup against a traditional foe that other Sunni jihadist groups, including its rival al-Qaeda, have failed to target in the past.

What is the likely effect of the attacks?

Middle East analyst Dina Esfandiary says one possible consequence will be increased calls by hardliners for tougher action against IS in Iraq and Syria.

Public support for action in Iraq is likely to grow, as it did when IS took swathes of territory in the country in 2014.

But Iran's involvement in Syria is not popular, our analyst says - it is seen as having few benefits and costing too many Iranian lives.

The attacks will also boost the popularity of the Revolutionary Guards, seen as protectors of the nation.
1 Week Ago  
Tuan
 
 
The fall of Raqqa: hunting the last jihadists in Isis's capital of cruelty

Quote:
The terror group used the Syrian city to showcase its savagery. Now a sense of vengeance is galvanising the final fightback
1 Week Ago  
lljadw
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuan
At the dawn of a new world order where the leaders of the western liberal democracies including the USA, the UK, Canada, Germany and France announce their vision and mission of the future leadership for the "free world"; Russia, China and India on the other hand compete with each other for sphere of regional and global influence; amid tensions in Korean peninsula, the so-called Islamic State claims that it has found a new target in the Middle East, as its suicide bombers blew themselves up in Tehran, after influencing the UK election by waging two attacks in two weeks. Meanwhile, Iran's Revolutionary Guards accused Saudi Arabia and the US of being behind the attacks. Is this the beginning of a new world order or chaos? Interesting times ahead...

Tehran attackers 'were IS recruits from Iran'
4 of 5 of the attackers were Iranian Kurds who had joined ISIS .

Source : Al Monitor "Iran wakes up to Salafi recruitment in Kurdish regions " .

It is very unlikely that KSA is behind these attacks,as ISIS executed several attacks in KSA .
 


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