nice analysis on the middle east




 
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nice analysis on the middle east
 
April 29th, 2012  
benaakatz
 
 

Topic: nice analysis on the middle east


nice analysis on the middle east
http://www.geneva-accord.org/mainmen...0-WvE.facebook
April 29th, 2012  
VDKMS
 
That's why democracy is so important. Israelis have the power to choose a new leader, a government that will go the extra mile to enforce a peace agreement. Unfortunately this is not possible in Palestine (with a fanatic Hamas - much worse than Netanyahu) or Iran where people are allowed to choose between politicians approved by the mullahs, who cannot be chosen and stay in power.
April 30th, 2012  
Der Alte
 
I think, if you look at what has happened over the past years as a consequence of this policy of spreading democracy by force, is that we have a Arab world that doesn't believe us.
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nice analysis on the middle east
April 30th, 2012  
benaakatz
 
 
true. but im pretty sure the if the last year has taught us anything is that the arabs are striving for democracy. it is what they want as a whole the most.

listen to christopher hitchens talk about regime change in iraq and democracy.
May 1st, 2012  
Der Alte
 
The best hope for modernization, and ultimately liberalization, in the Arab and Muslim worlds today lies in incumbent regimes who recognize that, first of all, economic modernization is essential to their country's future.

Churchill urged the Free World to lead by principled example, not to impose such principles by force; adopting the latter course risks subverting these principles from within, and thus eroding the foundations of our own democracy as we propose to build new democratic foundations abroad. The reality is that the ingredients for successful democracy are found in domestic political kitchens. Democracy is a dish that the Middle East must prepare for themselves.
May 1st, 2012  
VDKMS
 
Frankly, the ME is not yet ready for democracy. Religion is to heavely involved and the average resident not well enough educated (read easily manipulated) to make a choice.

The Arab spring was started by secular people and later hijacked by religious ones. The seculars were not able to stand up against the power of the mosques.

The constitution in a democracy must be very neutral and for all the people. If you throw in religion it is not for all the people anymore.
May 2nd, 2012  
Asef
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
Frankly, the ME is not yet ready for democracy. Religion is to heavely involved and the average resident not well enough educated (read easily manipulated) to make a choice.

The Arab spring was started by secular people and later hijacked by religious ones. The seculars were not able to stand up against the power of the mosques.

The constitution in a democracy must be very neutral and for all the people. If you throw in religion it is not for all the people anymore.
Typical Western mindset.

What is democracy as seen from the Muslim world? In recent times a so-called postcolonial critique has developed to challenge the long-standing dominance of Western thought in knowledge about world politics. It is important to contest modernist assumptions that democracy can be understood in wholly secular terms. On the contrary, religion and culture more generally open up key insights for concepts and practices of democracy in global affairs.

Islam offers a possible alternative frame of reference that sees democracy from a different angle. It should be stressed that Islam and democracy are not in contradiction. On the contrary, Islam has a rich tradition of thinking about democracy, although it encompasses various schools of thought. Hence there is no more a single Islamic idea of democracy than there is a single Western approach. In addition, Islamic scholarship has long engaged with international dimensions and contexts of democracy. Thus the problem is not that Islam has no ideas to contribute to debates about democracy, but that these notions have so far not spread beyond the narrow confines of Islamic studies to wider social enquiry.

In sum, then, Islam can contribute to conceptions of democracy with its concentration on the human condition, its ideas of nonterritorial community, its strivings for intercultural harmony, its insistence on social justice, and its recognition of the need for struggle to achieve a just democracy. These ideas can offer wider and richer conceptions of democracy than those provided by western political thought alone.
May 2nd, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Oddly enough I disagree, religion (any religion) and democracy are contradictions, democracy is at its base "Rule of the people" and I have yet to find any religion that holds national elections for its leaders.

Giving people a vote is not democracy if those that they elect are subservient to unelected leaders, in order to have genuine rule by the people all other power gathering organisations religion being one must be relegated to a lower position.
May 3rd, 2012  
hamidreza
 
Some questions
1- What is the different between west politics before these events and after that? For example compare Obama speech in Cairo University about the Mobark regime and his speech after Egypt revolution.
2- Do the western countries and especially the US, who show themselves as the guiding of freedom and democracy in the world (!!!), have the same policies with the different dictatorships in the region after these events?
3- Which country will increase his influence and which one will lose it in the ME in future?
May 4th, 2012  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hamidreza
Some questions
1- What is the different between west politics before these events and after that? For example compare Obama speech in Cairo University about the Mobark regime and his speech after Egypt revolution.
2- Do the western countries and especially the US, who show themselves as the guiding of freedom and democracy in the world (!!!), have the same policies with the different dictatorships in the region after these events?
3- Which country will increase his influence and which one will lose it in the ME in future?
Politics is dirty business. It's about power. But also about defending interests which can be a disadvantage for other people/countries. Take oil for instance. The ME is full of it and many countries are dependent on it. If the oil producing countries of the ME decide to block all oil exports it's war. People all over the world will force their governments to take action.

But politics is also a balancing act. Again interests come into play. Everyone is watching the Arab spring and looking for ways to keep doing business but one good turn deserves another.

About which country will increase his influence and which one will lose it in the ME in future? It depends. Influece on people or government? Do not forget that new leaders will be informed by the secret services of that country and will hear a lot of new things that they didn't know about. China and Russia are for the moment not very well liked in the ME but once their financial support arrives that can quickly change.

Democracy in Islam is impossible. Islam in a democracy is possible. It's called cultural Islam. Rule of law is neutral, for all people. Holidays are islamic ones. Just as christianity in a democracy is called Cultural Christianity. Christian holidays. But when religious laws are put into the rule of law democracy is finished. Religion can be a splendid thing if it is used for personal benefits. Once you force it upon other people it's terror.
 


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