Napalm the bocage! - Page 5




 
--
 
December 18th, 2011  
samneanderthal
 
Hi MontyB
It is very difficult to counter attack when the trees have been wiped out by fire and you have to face lots of tanks and planes.

Hi 84RFK,
You're obviously not familiar with the French casualties incurred in carpet bombing, naval shelling, etc in Normandy, the Filipino causalties caused by American artillery in Manila, etc, Liberating is often expensive. Trees are certainly not a valuable asset, compared to humans and population density in the bocage was quite low. Placing nepalm with small planes is quite accurate, so much so that they destroyed many foxholes, etc,

It is surprising that Canada with a much smaller population and stake in the war provided 10 divisions, compared to 6 from Britain, yet the Canadians yielded command to Monty. Moreover, Churchill asked for Canadian casualties to be counted as British. Most importantly, Ike put a much larger American force under Monty's command and didn't demote Monty until he performed dismally and then put Bradley in charge of the American troops and the British press and people were quite bitter about it.
December 19th, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samneanderthal
Hi MontyB
It is very difficult to counter attack when the trees have been wipe out by fire and you have to face lots of tanks and planes.

Hi 84RFK,
You're obviously not familiar with the French casualties incurred in carpet bombing, naval shelling, etc in Normandy, the filipino causalties caused by American artillery in Manila, etc, Liberating is often expensive. Trees are certainly not a valuable asset, compared to humans and population density in the bocage was quite low. Placing nepalm with small planes is quite accurate, so much so that they destroyed many foxholes, etc,

It is surprising that Canada with a much smaller population and stake in the war provided 10 divisions, compared to 6 from Britain, yet the Canadians yielded command to Monty. Moreover, Churchill asked for Canadian casualties to be counted as British. Most importantly, Ike put a much larger American force under Monty's command and didn't demote Monty until he performed dismally and then put Bradley in charge of the American troops and the British press and people were quite bitter about it.
Again you are talking out of your arse

*Any American troops in the vicinity of Argentan were ordered to be withdrawn.*This order effectively halted the southern pincer movement of General Haislip's XV Corps.

Though General Patton protested the order, he obeyed it, leaving an exit - a 'trap with a gap' - for the remaining German forces. Around 20-50,000 German troops (leaving almost all of their heavy material) escaped through the gap, avoiding encirclement and almost certain destruction. They would later be reorganized and rearmed in time to slow the Allied advance into Holland and Germany.

Most of the blame for this outcome has been placed on Bradley. Bradley had incorrectly assumed, based on*Ultra*decoding transcripts, that most of the Germans had already escaped encirclement, and he feared a German counterattack as well as possible friendly fire casualties.*Though admitting a mistake had been made, Bradley placed the blame on General Montgomery for moving the Commonwealth troops too slowly, though the latter were in direct contact with a large number of SS Panzer,*Fallschirmjaeger, and other elite German forces.

Pick the bones out of that you prat.
December 19th, 2011  
samneanderthal
 
Bradley's A soldier's Story is great reading, though you will probably call it fiction

By the way, the brilliant Polish General who closed Falaise did not receive a pension from Britain, but tended bar in a London hotel at age 80 to make a living.
Churchill and Monty made excellent use of troops from Poland, Australia, South Africa, India, Canada, New Zealand, free France, etc, but not very good use of British troops.

The experienced Monty was so slow in Sicily, that the rooky Patton had to bypass him and request permission to advance on his own and then covered impressive territory in a short time, to Monty's dismay.
--
December 19th, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Yea it is fiction when he blames Monty and others for his **** up's.
December 19th, 2011  
42RM
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samneanderthal
Hi MontyB
It is very difficult to counter attack when the trees have been wiped out by fire and you have to face lots of tanks and planes.

Hi 84RFK,
You're obviously not familiar with the French casualties incurred in carpet bombing, naval shelling, etc in Normandy, the Filipino causalties caused by American artillery in Manila, etc, Liberating is often expensive. Trees are certainly not a valuable asset, compared to humans and population density in the bocage was quite low. Placing nepalm with small planes is quite accurate, so much so that they destroyed many foxholes, etc,

It is surprising that Canada with a much smaller population and stake in the war provided 10 divisions, compared to 6 from Britain, yet the Canadians yielded command to Monty. Moreover, Churchill asked for Canadian casualties to be counted as British. Most importantly, Ike put a much larger American force under Monty's command and didn't demote Monty until he performed dismally and then put Bradley in charge of the American troops and the British press and people were quite bitter about it.
Done much counterattacking?

The primary dispersment of napalm in WWII was through the usage of 165-gallon containers. A single firebomb dropped from an airplane at low-altitude was capable of producing damage to a 2500-yd2 area. Bombing at very low levels (25 feet) was satisfactory, but the effectiveness of the bomb was reduced to some extent by its skipping when it hit.

It is not a precision weapon. Its most effective against tanks, troops in trenches, and inflammable targets.
December 19th, 2011  
samneanderthal
 
skipping over hedgerows?
December 19th, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samneanderthal
skipping over hedgerows?
Have you ever seen a bomb skip? Obviously not.
December 19th, 2011  
42RM
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samneanderthal
skipping over hedgerows?
Yes, even buildings. Bombs that skipped off of the ground developed very unpredictable trajectories and missed as often as they hit.
December 19th, 2011  
Seehund
 
Skipping bombs is used against water-borne targets. Its possible to skip bombs off the surface of the water in a very predictable way.

It was actually the British, early in September, 1939, who first tried low-level and skip bombing tactics against actual naval targets with mixed success. But they continued with these types of attacks and developed a workable method of consistently hitting moving ships. Not to be confused with Skip bombing was the Bouncing bomb. A bomb designed specifically to bounce to a target across water in a calculated manner, in order to avoid obstacles such as torpedo nets, and to allow both the bomb's speed on arrival at the target and the timing of its detonation to be pre-determined.
December 19th, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
The Americans also used skip bombing in the early Mustangs when they found they were not very good in aerial combat
 


Similar Topics
WW2 Trivia
Air Force Cadence
Pentagon confirms using white phosphorous in Iraq
US 'uses incendiary arms' in Iraq