Napalm the bocage! - Page 10




 
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December 21st, 2011  
BritinBritain
 
 
Ever felt like knocking your head against a brick wall?
December 21st, 2011  
Trooper1854
 
 
Didn't want to get involved in this one really, but all I want to say is that if anyone remebers the footage of the village in Vietnam that was napalmed, the one when the little girl is then filmed running up the road with all her clothes burnt off and her skin hanging off, you'll see what a random, uncontrolled weapon it is.
You can not have friendlies any where near the target area if you don't want to have casualies among your own.

When stocks of napalm were found durring the Falklands campaign, one member of the Parachute Regiment summed it up clearly;
" A bastard of a weapon!"
December 21st, 2011  
Der Alte
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
All this talk of of the 1929 Geneva Convention really was totally ignored by both sides on the whole.
I will say to the English praise that I was fully processed after the Geneva Convention when I was captured by British troops in 1945.
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December 21st, 2011  
84RFK
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
Ever felt like knocking your head against a brick wall?
You mean like....

Been there, done that, grown used to it.
December 21st, 2011  
84RFK
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Der Alte
I will say to the English praise that I was fully processed after the Geneva Convention when I was captured by British troops in 1945.
As I have mentioned Narvik here earlier, I've seen comments on the treatment of prisoners of war on some occations, mentioning German POW's having a rather rough time in the hands of Polish troops, and to some extent units from the French foreign legion on the Narvik front.
Several of the veterans have mentioned incidents where Norwegian soldiers, with little military experience and no authority at all, had to interfer with Polish troops in order to prevent mistreatment and even summary execution of German POW's in the field.

I suppose the difference here lays in the fact that while the British and French hadn't actually suffered the real trauma of war, the Polish had fresh experience from the German invasion of Poland, and thus bore a great deal of bitterness and hate towards their enemy.

But there was violations of the Geneva Convention to be found on both sides, the Germans did use both civilians and POW's as human shields during the campaign, and POW's was forced into the German supply chain as carriers.
December 21st, 2011  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Der Alte
I will say to the English praise that I was fully processed after the Geneva Convention when I was captured by British troops in 1945.
Where were you captured Colonel if I may ask?
December 21st, 2011  
Der Alte
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
Where were you captured Colonel if I may ask?
Close to Oldendorf in Lower Saxony (Northern Germany)

The British combat troops, some of whom had seen D-Day, was very kind to us and gave us cigarettes and biscuits.

I was very rebellious and cheeky to the British officers until an older German Major came over to me and gave me a slap in the head with his hand. I remember it yet. I was asked to keep my mouth shut and show respect for the British officers. As he said, even though we were POWs I stood under his command and was still under German military penal code. It suited me not but I was bound by my oath as an officer. I had to swallow that camel.

It was only when we came in contact with troops who had never been in battle that we were treated like animals. Today I well understand but then I was ready to kill them all.

In German you are addressed as a Lieutenant colonel never as Colonel
It would be an insult to a full colonel

But I appreciate the respect you show.
December 21st, 2011  
Del Boy
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Not necessarily as time allows us to look at all sides with the impartiality of no emotional attachment of course that can also lead to revisionism however to a large degree even that is no less inaccurate than half a story.
Personally, I like to look at things from both ends of the telescope. Happy Christmas BTW.
December 21st, 2011  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Der Alte
Close to Oldendorf in Lower Saxony (Northern Germany)

The British combat troops, some of whom had seen D-Day, was very kind to us and gave us cigarettes and biscuits.

I was very rebellious and cheeky to the British officers until an older German Major came over to me and gave me a slap in the head with his hand. I remember it yet. I was asked to keep my mouth shut and show respect for the British officers. As he said, even though we were POWs I stood under his command and was still under German military penal code. It suited me not but I was bound by my oath as an officer. I had to swallow that camel.

It was only when we came in contact with troops who had never been in battle that we were treated like animals. Today I well understand but then I was ready to kill them all.

In German you are addressed as a Lieutenant colonel never as Colonel
It would be an insult to a full colonel

But I appreciate the respect you show.
My apologies Lieutenant colonel, it was common practice in the British Army to address a Lieutenant colonel as Colonel. Old habits die hard, but I will gladly respect your views.

What rank were you when you were captured, and what camp were you sent to if I may ask Lieutenant colonel? I apologies for the questions, but its not often one gets to ask someone who were there.

I was on a number of exercises in Northern Germany when I was in the Royal Corps of Transport Territorial Army as a section commander. I ended up in the British Military Hospital in Hanover with a broken arm and ribs, after trying to jump a ditch with a 10 ton truck. But that's another story.

I developed a taste for Asbach while I were there, I still have a bottle unopened in my drinks cabinet, one day I will crack it open.
December 21st, 2011  
84RFK
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Der Alte
.....until an older German Major came over to me and gave me a slap in the head with his hand. I remember it yet. I was asked to keep my mouth shut and show respect for the British officers. As he said, even though we were POWs I stood under his command and was still under German military penal code. It suited me not but I was bound by my oath as an officer. I had to swallow that camel.....
A confusing situation (and period of time) that Siegfried Lenz managed to describe in his short story "Ein Kriegsende".
 


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