name the war of 1812 - Page 4




 
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August 13th, 2005  
Ray89
 
 
well science theres shows like "Thats 70's show"
i guess you can name it "That war of 1812"
August 13th, 2005  
tomtom22
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Quote:
Originally Posted by SigPig
The British-American War (after the Mexican-American War and the Spanish-American War).
Hmm that would make it the Anglo-Amercan war.
Either way your'e both right!
May 2nd, 2006  
poacher63
 
This clearly is important for Americans as you're the only ones that seem bring it up. As always its perspectives the only thing that matters from the British point of view was that yet again we had a war on the periphery of the main event and that was Global domination! And the Canadians proved that actually were not that bad a lads! cheers! Ooh just had a thought! how about instead of War of 1812, The War of National Awareness!
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May 6th, 2006  
WarMachine
 
 
I can't believe this is still going on too after my extended hiatus from this forum. How bout we just leave the unispired name alone? It wasn't a major conflict and no one really gained anything from it. I'm guessing that whoever name it the war of 1812 probably felt the same since it lasted 2 years and was a part of the much larger napoleonic conflict.
May 10th, 2006  
tomtom22
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WarMachine
I can't believe this is still going on too after my extended hiatus from this forum. How bout we just leave the unispired name alone? It wasn't a major conflict and no one really gained anything from it. I'm guessing that whoever name it the war of 1812 probably felt the same since it lasted 2 years and was a part of the much larger napoleonic conflict.
Why didn't they call it the War of 1812-1813 then?
May 10th, 2006  
Charge 7
 
 
Just in case anybody really cares, the Treaty of Ghent was concluded on Christmas Eve 1814, and though the Battle of New Orleans was fought from late December 1814 until January 8th of 1815, the treaty wasn't proclaimed until February 1815.

http://www.idloa.org/pages/ghent.html
May 12th, 2006  
boris116
 
 
It is funny, but in Russia they have the same problem -one of the few things that are common for Russia and the U.S. of A.
In June 1812 Napoleon has invaded Russia, burnt Moscow(another similarity!), which was not the official capital at that time, however.
Then he had to leave in a hurry and his Grand Army has been almost decimated by the Russian Army, guerilla fighters, hunger and cold.
This war is called in Russia as The War of 1812 or the Patriotic War.

That piece by Tchaikovsky that the Americans so love to hear on July 4th is called "1812" in memory of THAT war!
May 12th, 2006  
perseus
 
 
Quote:
Just in case anybody really cares, the Treaty of Ghent was concluded on Christmas Eve 1814, and though the Battle of New Orleans was fought from late December 1814 until January 8th of 1815, the treaty wasn't proclaimed until February 1815.


It was also confused at the start:

American general William Hull commanded the left flank of the American attack on Canada in 1812, but no one told him that war had been declared. So he sent baggage, medical supplies tools and a trunk containing details of the column, his orders, and campaign details past a British fort, which were intercepted. Hull was later duped into surrendering a fort by a much weaker force. The British dressed villagers as redcoats, made the Indians look bloodthirsty by wearing war-paint and provided mis-information that more Indians were on the way (shades of the river Plate!). It didn't help taking his daughter and her children with him on the campaign. He was later court marshalled for cowardice.

In 1815 at New Orleans the tables were turned, it seems that neither the American general Andrew Jackson nor Sir Edward Pakenham in charge of the British forces, seemed to know that the war had officially ended (or had it?) Jackson had a motley crew of infantry ranging from regulars to militia and pirates, so he choose a well defended position and ‘invited the British to attack his 5000 muskets over a 1000 yard front with bayonets. The British duly obliged, and subsequently suffered 2100 casualties compared with 21 for the Americans.

So what's the practical difference between "concluded" and "proclaimed", to allow some time to settle differences? No wonder this was one war everyone tried to forget.
May 13th, 2006  
mmarsh
 
 
Another bit of useless infomation.

The war 1812 was actually called the 2nd American Revolution for a time until its name was changed.