N. Korean envoy: Pressure could trigger war - Page 2




 
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N. Korean envoy: Pressure could trigger war
 
July 13th, 2006  
filmmaker
 
 
N. Korean envoy: Pressure could trigger war
regardless of some b******t communist ideology, I don't think Kim will care how chinese feel about this. Chinese will not do US any real favor as well ,unless They can get some solid benefits from these North Korean things. since chinese become the one of biggest business man, making a profitable business is their first option.

What Kim really want is to drag America's ass into a game where Kim can play one on one with Bush.
Quote:
New North Korea Resolution Offered





By WARREN HOGE and JOSEPH KAHN
Published: July 13, 2006
UNITED NATIONS, July 12 — China and Russia introduced a draft resolution on North Korea in the Security Council on Wednesday and asked the Council’s members to consider it in place of a Japanese-sponsored resolution, to which they both have objected, that would have allowed for military enforcement and sanctions.
In offering the new measure, Wang Guangya, the Chinese ambassador, said he had instructions from his government to veto the Japanese resolution if it were put to a vote.
Japan and its resolution’s co-sponsors, Britain, France and the United States, have been putting off a vote this week at the request of China, which said action by the Council would interfere with a Chinese diplomatic mission now in North Korea.
In Beijing, an American official praised China’s diplomatic efforts and called for a unified response to North Korea’s missile tests, but it was clear that fissures between the main Asian powers had overshadowed any common stance that might put pressure on North Korea.
Christopher R. Hill, assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, held talks in Beijing but prepared to return to Washington on Thursday morning without any sign that North Korea was prepared to return to six-nation disarmament talks. He called North Korea’s stance “discouraging.”
The new Chinese-Russian draft resolution covers many of the same demands on North Korea that the Japanese-drafted measure does, but it significantly does so without resorting to Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, which would allow for military enforcement, and without proposing sanctions against North Korea for noncompliance.
China and Russia had opposed those aspects of the original measure, saying they would destabilize the region and be viewed by North Korea as a provocation.
The text of the Chinese-Russian resolution “strongly deplores” last week’s North Korean tests, calls on member states to work to prevent North Korea from receiving or selling missile-related items and “strongly urges” it to return without precondition to the six-nation talks.
Kenzo Oshima, the Japanese ambassador, said his government needed time to judge the new text. “But a quick glance at the text shows there are very serious gaps on very important issues,” he said. He did not specify them.
John R. Bolton, the American ambassador, said the United States still backed the Japanese resolution but welcomed the new measure because it was in the form of a resolution rather than a nonbinding presidential statement that the Chinese and Russians had earlier insisted was sufficient.
He said it “puts us on an apples-to-apples and oranges-to-oranges basis and now we can talk about a resolution, which is the appropriate measure through which the Security Council should act.”
China, which has engaged in intensive talks with North Korea in recent days, said sanctions imposed on North Korea last fall by the United States Treasury Department must be lifted before North Korea would resume discussions about its weapons programs. “We hope the U.S. can take measures to help the six-nation talks resume by compromising on the sanctions,” said Liu Jianchao, China’s Foreign Ministry spokesman. “We don’t want to see this impasse drag on forever.”
The Treasury Department in October seized the American assets of eight North Korean companies it accused of helping proliferate weapons and imposed sanctions on Banco Delta Asia of Macao, accused of helping to launder North Korean money.
Mr. Hill, speaking to reporters on Wednesday afternoon, reiterated the Bush administration’s position that financial sanctions would not be eased until North Korea stopped its nuclear weapons and long-range missile programs and ended efforts to counterfeit American currency.
“We have a country that seems to be more interested in missiles than providing electricity or food for its people,” he said. “We are looking for ways to prevent’’ North Korea “from financing these activities, and frankly that’s what we should be doing.”
The six-nation talks reached a preliminary accord calling for North Korean nuclear disarmament last September but have since foundered, with North Korea declining to participate in multilateral discussions while the United States imposes sanctions. Japan, South Korea and Russia are also involved in the talks.
China’s call to ease financial sanctions suggests that it is still occupying the middle ground between the United States and North Korea, or even tilting slightly toward North Korea despite its missile tests.
North Korea defied appeals from China as well as the United States and other major powers when it test-fired the seven missiles last week.
Bush administration officials clearly hoped that the tests, which appeared to come as a surprise to China, would prompt it to take a much tougher approach to North Korea, its Communist ally and neighbor. So far, however, China appears to be sticking to its role as honest broker, hoping to maintain close relations with both parties and pushing them toward direct talks.
Warren Hoge reported from the United Nations for this article, and Joseph Kahn from Beijing.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/13/wo...a/13korea.html


instead of suggesting Us to ease financial sanctions ,chinese should give Kim some solid pressure.
July 13th, 2006  
5.56X45mm
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oRTouCH
Remember Saddam before the 2nd Gulf War started?
He said that Iraq will never let USA to invade Iraq... But in the end USA captured the capital city of Iraq in 21 days...
Kim can talk like that before a conflict, but If a conflict starts he will try to hide as Saddam did...
These men are the cowards only talk... They have not enough courage to fight for themselves or for their countries!
Expect Norh Korea and Kim Jong Ill have thousands of artillery pieces targeting civilian and military locations all over South Korea. Also, they can hit targets in Japan. These aren't normal artillery rounds. These are chemical and biological warheads. Also, North Korea does have a certain number of ballistic missiles with the same warheads. Lastly, they have nuclear wepaons.

Crazy people backed into a corner have nothing to lose. Look at Hitler, prime example. By 1943, he knew that Germany couldn't win the war. But he didn't care, if Hitler was to lose the war, Germany would be destroyed.

Kim Jong Ill is the type of man.
July 14th, 2006  
bulldogg
 
 
13 July, 2006NORTH KOREA – CHINA - USAChina “got nothing” from Pyongyang on missile crisisThis was the conclusion Christopher Hill came to after two days in Beijing for consultations on the UN response to North Korea’s provocations. The regime of Kim Jong-il has demanded that Seoul supply food aid in return for military protection on offer for the whole peninsula.

Beijing (AsiaNews/Agencies) – The Chinese have not registered “any progress” with North Korea and the Beijing delegation in Pyongyang for three days “has obtained nothing so far”. This was the downbeat assessment of Christopher Hill, US Assistant Secretary of State for Asian affairs, regarding attempts by the Chinese authorities to mediate in the UN response to North Korea’s missile launches. Meanwhile, Pyongyang has demanded that South Korea deliver food aid in return for military protection on offer for the whole peninsula.
Hill, currently on a trip to Asian capitals involved in the North Korean missile saga, reached Beijing after visiting Seoul and Tokyo. In the two days he was in Beiing, he met the Foreign Affairs Minister, Li Zhaoxing.
Leaving the country, he said he foresaw a “very strong message” of the international community to North Korea. “I have said all I could about the mission of the Chinese in Pyongyang. There was no progress.” Hill said he was “worried” about the attitude of North Korea, adding that the “Chinese are as baffled as we are.” He said: “China has done so much for that country, and North Korea has taken all that generosity and given nothing back... The Chinese seem a bit frustrated to me”.
Hill’s mission followed a Security Council delay in deciding which resolution – either one by Japan and the US providing for sanctions or a Sino-Russian one that does not – it should adopt to tackle North Korea. The delay was decided on Monday 9 July to allow for Chinese mediation.
In the meantime, the Stalinist regime led by Kim Jong-il has called on Seoul to “provide humanitarian aid promised to the people as soon as possible”, in return for assured “protection” for the entire peninsula. North Korea’s Senior Cabinet adviser, Kwon Ho-ung, said yesterday that the “Songun ideology [which preaches a military-first approach, putting military development above everything else] impoverished us but thus, we can help the South and the South Korean people to protect their security”.
Further, Kwon called for the suspension of joint military exercises between South Korea and the United States and urged “all patriots of the Korean peninsula” to visit “sacred places in the North” to celebrate the liberation from the Japanese colonialist regime on 15 August. Included in these “shrines”, there are the Kumsusan Memorial Palace where still now former North Korean leader Kim Il-sung lies embalmed – although he died 12 years ago – and the Patriotic Martyrs' Cemetery.

http://w2.hidemyass.com/index.php?q=...VuJmFydD02Njg4

No surprise here, the Chinese failed and the DPRK is attempting to blackmail the South into feeding them.
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N. Korean envoy: Pressure could trigger war
July 14th, 2006  
tomtom22
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogg
No surprise here, the Chinese failed and the DPRK is attempting to blackmail the South into feeding them.
I had the same take on this after reading the whole article.
July 14th, 2006  
filmmaker
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulldogg
13 July, 2006NORTH KOREA – CHINA - USAChina “got nothing” from Pyongyang on missile crisisThis was the conclusion Christopher Hill came to after two days in Beijing for consultations on the UN response to North Korea’s provocations. The regime of Kim Jong-il has demanded that Seoul supply food aid in return for military protection on offer for the whole peninsula.

Beijing (AsiaNews/Agencies) – The Chinese have not registered “any progress” with North Korea and the Beijing delegation in Pyongyang for three days “has obtained nothing so far”. This was the downbeat assessment of Christopher Hill, US Assistant Secretary of State for Asian affairs, regarding attempts by the Chinese authorities to mediate in the UN response to North Korea’s missile launches. Meanwhile, Pyongyang has demanded that South Korea deliver food aid in return for military protection on offer for the whole peninsula.
Hill, currently on a trip to Asian capitals involved in the North Korean missile saga, reached Beijing after visiting Seoul and Tokyo. In the two days he was in Beiing, he met the Foreign Affairs Minister, Li Zhaoxing.
Leaving the country, he said he foresaw a “very strong message” of the international community to North Korea. “I have said all I could about the mission of the Chinese in Pyongyang. There was no progress.” Hill said he was “worried” about the attitude of North Korea, adding that the “Chinese are as baffled as we are.” He said: “China has done so much for that country, and North Korea has taken all that generosity and given nothing back... The Chinese seem a bit frustrated to me”.
Hill’s mission followed a Security Council delay in deciding which resolution – either one by Japan and the US providing for sanctions or a Sino-Russian one that does not – it should adopt to tackle North Korea. The delay was decided on Monday 9 July to allow for Chinese mediation.
In the meantime, the Stalinist regime led by Kim Jong-il has called on Seoul to “provide humanitarian aid promised to the people as soon as possible”, in return for assured “protection” for the entire peninsula. North Korea’s Senior Cabinet adviser, Kwon Ho-ung, said yesterday that the “Songun ideology [which preaches a military-first approach, putting military development above everything else] impoverished us but thus, we can help the South and the South Korean people to protect their security”.
Further, Kwon called for the suspension of joint military exercises between South Korea and the United States and urged “all patriots of the Korean peninsula” to visit “sacred places in the North” to celebrate the liberation from the Japanese colonialist regime on 15 August. Included in these “shrines”, there are the Kumsusan Memorial Palace where still now former North Korean leader Kim Il-sung lies embalmed – although he died 12 years ago – and the Patriotic Martyrs' Cemetery.

http://w2.hidemyass.com/index.php?q=...VuJmFydD02Njg4

No surprise here, the Chinese failed and the DPRK is attempting to blackmail the South into feeding them.
just let Kim aka "human trash" eat dust.
July 14th, 2006  
Diponegoro
 
So it's intimidations for food? Like hunger man with knife asks for bread.
What a shame!
July 15th, 2006  
MIRV FAN
 
 
I agree China is the problem, i say take out N.Korea now with a Tactical Passive Nuclear strike or pay threw the nose later.
July 15th, 2006  
hc^patonki
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIRV FAN
I agree China is the problem, i say take out N.Korea now with a Tactical Passive Nuclear strike or pay threw the nose later.

Are you insane? You really want to use nuclearweapons with no actuall reasons? I really hope you americans do that, and probally those koreans use one of them own, on one of your cities for excample New York.
It seems that you guys really want to start third world war.
July 15th, 2006  
bulldogg
 
 
So what do you suggest?
July 17th, 2006  
filmmaker
 
 
[quote]Security Council Rebukes N. Korea

Nations Agree To Demand End Of Missile Program


By Colum Lynch
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, July 16, 2006; Page A13
UNITED NATIONS, July 15 -- The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Saturday to approve a resolution demanding that North Korea cease its ballistic missile program and requiring states to help prevent Pyongyang's import or export of ballistic missiles. The 15 to 0 vote ended an 11-day diplomatic deadlock that pitted the United States, Japan and Europe against Russia and China.
The vote represented the strongest international rebuke of North Korea since 1993, when the council adopted a resolution urging North Korea to reverse a decision to withdraw from the 1970 nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.
,'UNITED NATIONS, July 15 -- The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Saturday to approve a resolution demanding that North Korea cease its ballistic missile program and requiring states to help prevent Pyongyang\'s import or export of ballistic missiles. The 15 to 0 vote ended an
The accord, Resolution 1695, came after President Bush and Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, who are attending the Group of Eight summit in St. Petersburg, yielded to Chinese and Russian pressure to drop an explicit reference to a provision in the Charter of the United Nations that has traditionally been cited to impose sanctions and authorize military force. The accord also followed a failed Chinese diplomatic initiative to persuade Pyongyang to halt its program.
The Bush administration hailed the council's decision to condemn Pyongyang's July 4 launch of seven missiles, including the unsuccessful launch of the long-range Taepodong-2 missile.
U.S., Japanese and European officials asserted that the unanimous vote sends an unambiguous message to North Korea that it must stop developing nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles, or face more isolation and punishment.
Council diplomats said it would also strengthen the United States and its allies in interdicting missile shipments in international waters. In 2002, the White House was compelled to order the release of a seized vessel in the Arabian Sea that was transporting 15 Scud missiles from North Korea to Yemen, because there was no provision under international law prohibiting it.
John R. Bolton, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, warned after the vote that the United States will press for stronger Security Council action if Pyongyang fails to abide by the council's demands.
"We look forward to North Korea's full, unconditional and immediate compliance with this Security Council resolution," he said. "We hope that North Korea makes the strategic decision that the pursuit of WMD programs and threatening acts like these missile launches make it less, not more, secure. We need to be prepared, though, that North Korea might choose a different path."
It remained unclear whether Saturday's vote would bring an end to missile tests by North Korea, which has previously ignored Security Council demands to stop its nuclear weapons program and submit to U.N. inspections.
North Korea's ambassador, Pak Gil Yon, rejected the council's decision as an "unjustifiable and gangsterlike" abuse of power. He denied that Pyongyang had violated any international laws or agreements by launching missiles.
North Korea "resolutely condemns the attempt of some countries to misuse the Security Council for the despicable political aim to isolate and put pressure on the DPRK, and totally rejects the resolution," he said using the abbreviation for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.
"The latest successful missile launches were part of the routine military exercises staged by the Korean people's army to increase their military capacity for self-defense," he added.
The resolution demanded that North Korea suspend ballistic missile activities and abide by a 1999 moratorium on missile tests. It urged the government to return to six-nation talks aimed at eliminating Pyongyang's nuclear weapons. And it expressed "grave concern" at the launches, given that they "could be used as a means to deliver nuclear, chemical or biological payloads."
The resolution negotiations nearly collapsed this week after China threatened to veto any resolution invoking Chapter 7 of the U.N. Charter, a mandatory provision that has been enforced through economic sanctions or military force.
The United States and Japan overcame Chinese opposition by agreeing to include language offered by France and Britain that only implicitly referred to Chapter 7.


/QUOTE]

my favor part is that N Korean said "unjustifiable and gangsterlike abuse of power".
what was this moron talking about? is it justifiable or less gangsterlike that Kim kept bargaining with everybody by threating to aggravate situation and launching some missles. if Kim insists to test his baby toy, his mom will choose not to cover his ass.
 


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