My collection WWII - Page 7




 
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January 11th, 2012  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JT1959
Will eventually show pictures of a very special German medal:
This is "The Blutorden" or the Blood Order 2nd pattern.

Blood Order

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Blood Order (Ger. Blutorden), officially known as the Decoration (of the Munich putsch) of 9 November 1923 (Ger. Medaille zur Erinnerung an den 9. November 1923), was one of the most prestigious decorations in the Nazi Party.

In May 1938, to the dismay of the putsch participants, the award was extended to persons who had (a) served time in prison for Nazi activities before 1933, (b) received a death sentence which was later commuted to life imprisonment for Nazi activities before 1933, or (c) been severely wounded in the service of the Party before 1933; subsequently it was further extended to members of the Austrian Nazi Party who had participated in the 1934 February Uprising or July Putsch, or who had received significant prison time or injuries for National Socialist activities. It could also be bestowed on certain other individuals at the discretion of Adolf Hitler, the last recipient being Reinhard Heydrich (posthumous). These subsequent medals were struck in 80% silver with serial numbers above 1500 and did not carry the maker's name (J. FUESS MÜNCHEN) as the Type I medals did. If a holder of this medal left the party, the medal would have to be relinquished.

Regards
JT1959
Is this medal expensive?

take care,

G
January 11th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JT1959
Yes I see them now and then. Often from the German military field police. I do not have any in my own collection, but they are not rare (except SS gorgets).
The reason I ask is that when I purchased my MP-44 the guy sent a second one in much worse condition and in the box was a bunch of other "odd militaria" which included a gorget and I am assuming it is a luftwaffe one as it has the luftwaffe eagle on it, I have been trying to figure out what to do with it as I am not even sure whether it is real or fake.
January 11th, 2012  
JT1959
 
 
Hi Monty,
If you can send me (jtonnessen@frutarom.com) good pictures of both sides, I will check it for you.

And Ghostrider,
Yes, The Blood Order is very rare and expensive.
I was lucky and paid "only" NOK 30,500 (3,800 euros) for 2 years ago , but normally the price is now +NOK 55,000 (+6,900 euros)


Out of respect for board members, the moderator deleted some of the pictures I posted of the German effects from WWII. It is not all of us that share opinion that this is important historical artifacts that should be taken care of for the future. I have also promised not to post more pictures in the folder "members galleries" of this type of objects. Hopefully it goes smoothly with these I have posted in this thread today. We must simply accept this. I do understand
I also have a collection of awards from other countries I can show later, but need to take some good photos first.

Take care.
Regards from Norway
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ramme 22.jpg (57.7 KB, 4 views)
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January 11th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
What I figured I would do is send the box into the local army museum as I am donating the second MP-44 to them for restoration anyway and let them tell me what all the stuff is as there is a lot of it (he sent out the weapon in a chest about a metre long and half a metre high and wide and it was packed with all sorts of things from Italian naval ensigns to arm bands.

But I probably should photograph it all before I send it off just for fun although it may take a month to find my camera as I tend to only use my phone one these days.
January 11th, 2012  
JT1959
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
What I figured I would do is send the box into the local army museum as I am donating the second MP-44 to them for restoration anyway and let them tell me what all the stuff is as there is a lot of it (he sent out the weapon in a chest about a metre long and half a metre high and wide and it was packed with all sorts of things from Italian naval ensigns to arm bands. But I probably should photograph it all before I send it off just for fun although it may take a month to find my camera as I tend to only use my phone one these days.
To donate this type of objects to a local museum is a fine noble thing to do. Will still recommend that you first take good pictures of them. Get them judged, so you are aware of what kind of effects you give away and the value of them. If you collect other military objects, why not also use them in a trade (with the museum) or with other collectors ?

Regards
JT1959
January 11th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JT1959
To donate this type of objects to a local museum is a fine noble thing to do. Will still recommend that you first take good pictures of them. Get them judged, so you are aware of what kind of effects you give away and the value of them. If you collect other military objects, why not also use them in a trade (with the museum) or with other collectors ?

Regards
JT1959
Because I don't collect for any other reason than to preserve items for future reference and rather than me as an amateur trying to preserve these things and showing them to a few people that happen to visit I think it is best that a professional institution with the budget and expertise to maintain them properly exhibit them to the nation as a whole.

Don't get me wrong I am not against private collections but the reality is that for example in your case very few people will ever see the collection you have where as I like the idea that items I have collected will be seen by thousands and that as such the wider population will have a better understanding of the past.

New Zealand as a whole does not have a massive wealth of history to choose from it is not like our schools can take field trips to 2000+ years of monuments and battlefields yet we have fought in every major conflict since our creation as a nation in 1860 I think it is useful that we give people the opportunity to at least see what we have fought for and against in our brief history rather than leave it in a cabinet in a back room.
January 12th, 2012  
Alan P
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
Before you destroy anything JT, please please please get them checked out.
I agree with what BritinAfrica wrote. There were plenty of German War medals about for twenty years after the war was finished.
Obviously they were taken as souvenirs by the victorious troops. At the time a lot of those medals had never been worn and were shown by the children of returning soldiers at schools in Britain, just after the war.
At this present time the medals in question over the years have been snapped up by collectors and are quite scarce.
I strongly advise you to get all your medals etc checked out properly.
Do not destroy anything until after they have been examined and that goes for your badges.
There are fakes about but I hope everything turns out okay for you
January 14th, 2012  
JT1959
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Because I don't collect for any other reason than to preserve items for future reference and rather than me as an amateur trying to preserve these things and showing them to a few people that happen to visit I think it is best that a professional institution with the budget and expertise to maintain them properly exhibit them to the nation as a whole.
New Zealand as a whole does not have a massive wealth of history to choose from it is not like our schools can take field trips to 2000+ years of monuments and battlefields yet we have fought in every major conflict since our creation as a nation in 1860 I think it is useful that we give people the opportunity to at least see what we have fought for and against in our brief history rather than leave it in a cabinet in a back room.
Hi Monty,
I think we're a bit luckier here in Norway with regard to history. We are a small country with few people, but we have many museums. Most major cities have their own war museums and local museums as well. These are full of objects, and most items are in stock and are rarely or never exhibited. Hard to get allocated funding for expansion of museums, I think (and it is a shame)! I have also donated some items a few times to one of the local museums where I live. There was a short note about the items I donated to the museum's yearbook, but they only got article numbers and ended up in the warehouse. Believe they have never been in the exhibition.

Here some pictures from older items I have.

Fragment of a Viking sword from the early Iron Age (850-950 AD).
Spearhead and iron bars (used among others for trade and method of payment) (1000-1400 AD)
Lance / spear used by the Norwegian peasant army in battle with the Swedes 255cm long !! (1550-1650 AD).
Norwegian officer guard helmet mod. 1845.

Some of these objects have been loaned to a museum in connection with two themed exhibitions for many years. For my part, I would probably not donate more things, but is happy to lend them out to museums (if security is satisfactory)

Regards from Norway
JT1959
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Vikingsverd 01.jpg (56.6 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg x29.jpg (65.9 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg Bondehæren Spyd 1 255 cm.jpg (21.5 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg Bondehæren Spyd 3.JPG (58.2 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg 01.jpg (38.2 KB, 2 views)
January 14th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Nice stuff, I would love to collect Roman through Middle ages militaria but it will never happen in this part of the world because the logistics of finding and authenticating material of that era is just too much for an amateur collector where as equipment from the last 170 years is much easier to come by.

With regards to loaning things to museums as opposed to donating things I generally donate duplicate items and loan single items, but I will also donate items that are in such disrepair that they require professional restoration because there is no way I can do it and New Zealand does not have a lot of people capable of doing the job properly so it is easier to let a museum use its contacts and pick up the tab.
January 17th, 2012  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JT1959
Hi Monty,
I think we're a bit luckier here in Norway with regard to history. We are a small country with few people, but we have many museums. Most major cities have their own war museums and local museums as well. These are full of objects, and most items are in stock and are rarely or never exhibited. Hard to get allocated funding for expansion of museums, I think (and it is a shame)! I have also donated some items a few times to one of the local museums where I live. There was a short note about the items I donated to the museum's yearbook, but they only got article numbers and ended up in the warehouse. Believe they have never been in the exhibition.

Here some pictures from older items I have.

Fragment of a Viking sword from the early Iron Age (850-950 AD).
Spearhead and iron bars (used among others for trade and method of payment) (1000-1400 AD)
Lance / spear used by the Norwegian peasant army in battle with the Swedes 255cm long !! (1550-1650 AD).
Norwegian officer guard helmet mod. 1845.

Some of these objects have been loaned to a museum in connection with two themed exhibitions for many years. For my part, I would probably not donate more things, but is happy to lend them out to museums (if security is satisfactory)

Regards from Norway
JT1959
Hi JT,

Where did you get these items? Or do I really want to know that. The fragment of a Viking sword is impressive.

Ha det bra

G
 


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