My collection WWII - Page 3




 
--
 
January 2nd, 2012  
JT1959
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Der Alte
For something which is almost 70 years old and has been used on a uniform they look too be in too good a shape. It simply lacks patina, in my opinion.

The badge was usually lacquered with a composition called "Brennlack," which was a powdered metal. When oven heated the paint was burned, leaving a metallic type coating that will flake off with time.
Der Alte:
Thank you for the introduction and info about the CCC awards . Producers FLL and Juncker as you show pictures of, is the most common and many collectors prefer the awards made ​​by Juncker. However, I chose self manufacturer F & BL as the quality of these is generally much better and have cleaner nicer details.

However, I'm not totally agree with you on some statement:
Finding 70-year-old artefacts in mint quality is not unusual (remember that many of these awards have been in the original boxes since 1945!) In my coin collection, I have among other Roman coins from BC, in mint quality with exquisite touch brilliance (these are more than 2,000 years old).

If awards were used in the field, they naturally easily damage. Temperature changes also were exposed, was also encouraging rust and tarnish the process started. Improper storage at collectors will also impair the quality of several years of storage, so these factors can make the coating flake off over time. However, if the award is treated well and stored in proper temperature and environment....... Believe there will be awards of this type in mint quality also 500 years into the future.

Best regards
JT1959

I show here a few more examples from my collection of objects in top quality. Are these also fake on the same basis as the previous ones?

(mint quality = fake)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 007 a.jpg (55.7 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpg 008 xx.jpg (51.4 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg 154 xx.jpg (58.1 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg 154 xxx.jpg (75.0 KB, 7 views)
January 2nd, 2012  
JT1959
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Der Alte
How much did you pay for your Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes ?
An original cost 6,000 to 8,000 euros.
I had to pay NOK 50.900,- for this one (same as Euro 6.500).

Regards
JT1959
January 2nd, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
I would suggest getting a few of them authenticated that way you will know for sure rather than just accepting our point of view based off a couple of pictures, I would hate to see a genuine article destroyed off something I said.

But while I accept your point that they were in storage since 1945 I don't agree that they will be pristine because of that as I have my fathers and several uncles badges and medals from 1939-1946 and while the medals are pristine the badges have distinct signs of wear in contact areas (raised points, clasps etc.).
--
January 3rd, 2012  
JT1959
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
I would hate to see a genuine article destroyed off something I said.
Thank you for your feedback Monty !
Do not worry Mate. I still have around 400 German objects left, so are not empty yet. Since you both have clear ideas about the awards, then I expect of course that you are sitting with the knowledge as well. If you do not have the knowledge, it would surely have been a mistake to judge them regard to originality?

However, I am no longer authorized to put up more pictures in this thread
(must read a little on the forum pages to find a solution)
Sorry at the same time for possible strange sentences, as I do not speak English on a daily basis.

Regards
JT1959
January 3rd, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JT1959
Thank you for your feedback Monty !
Do not worry Mate. I still have around 400 German objects left, so are not empty yet. Since you both have clear ideas about the awards, then I expect of course that you are sitting with the knowledge as well. If you do not have the knowledge, it would surely have been a mistake to judge them regard to originality?

However, I am no longer authorized to put up more pictures in this thread
(must read a little on the forum pages to find a solution)
Sorry at the same time for possible strange sentences, as I do not speak English on a daily basis.

Regards
JT1959

Here is your best and fastest way of find out about the forums...

http://www.military-quotes.com/forum...estion-box-25/

post a question there and someone will help you out.



As far as the badges and medals go I would expect some wear on badges that people wear daily even if it is only in contact areas of the badge for example raised area will wear from cleaning but it is possible they were badges that were never issued in which case they would be in pristine condition.

I can only give you my opinion based on the pictures you have shown us so I would be wary of making too many decisions based soley on what I think.
January 3rd, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Before you destroy anything JT, please please please get them checked out.
January 3rd, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
I agree completely.
January 3rd, 2012  
Der Alte
 
Exactly!
Get it evaluated by an expert.

The very best reproductions were those made immediately after the war's end. These were made by the original manufacturers on their original dies, using original materials. These are virtually indistinguishable from wartime pieces. As materials ran out, and demand from souvenir hunting GI's increased, the manufacturers began using soft, lead based alloys and other inferior metals.

The most current reproductions are good. Very good in some cases. They can, and do fool experienced collectors as well as the novice. There is a far more frightening EK repro on the market today. It first appeared around February 2000, and is rumored to be made in Japan, on original wartime dies. These dies were supposedly purchased from an original wartime manufacturer that went out of business a few years ago. The obverse of this repro will scare you to death. It is amazingly accurate.
January 3rd, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Years ago in my shop, a German customer of mine came in and showed me an original SS ring, he said that he was going to the jeweller next door to have it cleaned. I was horrified, I told him that if it is original having the ring cleaned would devalue it considerably. I told him to get it checked out properly and ask advice before doing anything. Thankfully he heeded what I told him.
January 3rd, 2012  
JT1959
 
 
Many wise recommendations here eventually

Here a little wish from my side:
It could cause major economic losses to new members, if the board members commented that "I regret to say this, but I am quite sour that they are Reproduction" or "that they can not be original because the quality is too good." If new members receive this feedback, it may soon happen that objects are destroyed or sold as replicas at a fraction of the value.

I'm not saying this to scare members from commenting (Members Posts are appreciated and very welcome) You just have to be careful in terms of how one express himself.

Always recommended other members to consult experts, if you are in doubt yourself.

Regards
JT1959
 


Similar Topics
What 5 - 10% Lend Lease Meant to USSR in WWII
A very strange German WWII aircraft idea
WWII German Street Fighting Doctrine
A small bit of my WWII battle field collection!
Tribute to WWII Vets