Most successful military commander. - Page 11




 
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January 7th, 2011  
Korean Seaboy
 
 
Admiral Yi-Soon-Sin. Enough said
January 7th, 2011  
perseus
 
 
Well it might have been useful to reference his achievements along the strategies and technologies used between the Japanese and Korean navies at that time, since most of us are probably Euro-centric!

Wasn't Far East shipbuilding superior to European standards at this time? I may be thinking of the Mongols who utilised Chinese shipbuilders. It begs the question why these nations and not the Europeans subsequently dominated the world oceans.
May 24th, 2011  
r.fox
 
 
alexander the great
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May 24th, 2011  
Del Boy
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
Wasn't Far East shipbuilding superior to European standards at this time? I may be thinking of the Mongols who utilised Chinese shipbuilders. It begs the question why these nations and not the Europeans subsequently dominated the world oceans.
Perseus, have you forgotten already the English battle-song sang after WW11,(to my knowledge and probably on previous sea battle accounts):-

"Sons of the sea, all British born,
Sailed every ocean, laughing foe to scorn.
They can build their ships my lads; think they know the game;
But they can't beat the boys of the bulldog breed,
Who made old England's name."

Simples.
May 25th, 2011  
84RFK
 
 
I suppose the "Most successfull" is hard to decide, but among the more successfull I'd nominate General Lettow-Vorbeck of the German East-Africa army during WW I.

His achievments with very limited resources was impressing, and he was the only German commander to ever invade British territory during the WW I.
May 30th, 2011  
Metin
 
I can say someone from my country, but it wouldn't be fair, because Warfare on the steppes was the best in this world. So be the tactics. I vote for XI. Constantinus (togather with Giustiniani). Last emperor of Byzantium. It's not easy to hold a 32 km wall against a mass army of nearly 80.000 warrior infantry. For 52 days, it's hard... (that one is not succesful)

But Tiryaki Hasan Paşa did good in Kanije. With 9000 men strong defensive forces in Kanije Castle, he defeated 150.000 australian soldiers. Numbers may be wrong like 10 or 20 thousand, but it is a fact he won.
May 31st, 2011  
Korean Seaboy
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
Well it might have been useful to reference his achievements along the strategies and technologies used between the Japanese and Korean navies at that time, since most of us are probably Euro-centric!

Wasn't Far East shipbuilding superior to European standards at this time? I may be thinking of the Mongols who utilised Chinese shipbuilders. It begs the question why these nations and not the Europeans subsequently dominated the world oceans.

I said that, in the previous page (I meant, I posted a link). Thanks anyways for posting a link again
June 9th, 2011  
Prapor
 
 
Stepan Razin

Ataman Razin led a anti-Tsar Cossack rebellion on the Don and much of Volga in 1670s.

He lost, yes. The rebellion was crushed. But not only half the Tsarist army had been slaughtered, Razin's rebels had managed to kill two princes and a high-ranking general!

Also, he was and still is a hero to our people. He rose up for the poor. His gangs robbed rich noblemen and landlords, and gave much of their loot to the poor. A Cossack Robin Hood, of sorts.

In stanitsa (Cossack village) Zimoveiskaya, Razin's birth place, a monument to him was put up recently
June 12th, 2011  
MontyB
 
 
Well here is an interesting list...

1) Cyrus the Great
2) Alexander the Great
3) Julius Caesar
4) Napoleon Bonaparte
5) Hannibal Barca
6) Ghengis Khan
7) Adolf Hitler
8) William the Conqueror
9) Attila the Hun
10) Georgy Zhukov

http://listverse.com/2008/10/11/top-...ry-commanders/
June 18th, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
I often wonder why we see Napoleons name come up so often, he won a number of battles but still lost out over all. His invasion of the middle east was a disaster, his invasion of Spain and Portugal was also a disaster his invasion of Russia gave him the biggest losses he had suffered up to then and he lost the lot at Waterloo, yet many people think he was a great General. I wonder why ???
 


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