The Mosquito - Page 2




 
--
 
March 4th, 2022  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
Strangely I have heard a lot of RAF pilots preferred the P-38 Lightening for recon.
From what I have read the RAF disassociated itself from Lockheed.

During the Second World War, Adolf Hitlerís Luftwaffe was considered a formidable, ominous enemy by Allied pilots who took on the German planes over Europe and North Africa.

But one Allied aircraft gave the Germans pause because its unusual design and unique flight capabilities made it a formidable foe.

The P-38 Lightning fighter aircraft was a huge asset to the Americans when they joined the war in 1941. Though Britainís Royal Air Force (RAF) chose to sever its ties with the planeís manufacturer, Lockheed Martin, America was quick to accept it.

The plane came about in 1937 as the result of a proposal put forth by the U.S. Army Corps. A designer at Lockheed, Kelly Johnson, came up with the P-38 and won the bid.

The Armyís specific requirement was to have a plane that could fly faster than other fighter planes. The P-38 delivered: it could fly 395 mph, when pressed, and travel 1,000 miles, though not at that speed.

Johnsonís plane had other unusual features: twin, liquid-cooled engines; a slim, centered spot in which the pilot could sit; two machine guns; and a 20-millimeter cannon. It could climb to dizzying heights at an unprecedented rate, and even came equipped with a mechanism that softened the engineís noise.

But the P-38 had its share of drawbacks, too, some of which caused fatalities. Its unusual design led to habitual locking of the controls, and pilots had to be specially trained to deal with this and other problems.

Because of irregularities in its temperature control system, pilots were often subjected to freezing cold temperatures, even when flying in hot climates.

These are the issues that led the RAF to dismiss its contract with Lockheed, but the Americans quickly stepped in after the attack on Pearl Harbour in December 1941.
March 4th, 2022  
George
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinBritain
Flying a Mosquito?

.
Yes, surprised me too.
March 4th, 2022  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by George
Yes, surprised me too.
I read somewhere (or watched on TV) that the OSS used the Mosquito for operations contacting resistance fighters and groups on the run up to D Day. The OSS operator would be sitting on a long range fuel bladder in the fuselage.
--
March 4th, 2022  
George
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinBritain
From what I have read the RAF disassociated itself from Lockheed.

During the Second World War, Adolf Hitlerís Luftwaffe was considered a formidable, ominous enemy by Allied pilots who took on the German planes over Europe and North Africa.

But one Allied aircraft gave the Germans pause because its unusual design and unique flight capabilities made it a formidable foe.

The P-38 Lightning fighter aircraft was a huge asset to the Americans when they joined the war in 1941. Though Britainís Royal Air Force (RAF) chose to sever its ties with the planeís manufacturer, Lockheed Martin, America was quick to accept it.

The plane came about in 1937 as the result of a proposal put forth by the U.S. Army Corps. A designer at Lockheed, Kelly Johnson, came up with the P-38 and won the bid.

The Armyís specific requirement was to have a plane that could fly faster than other fighter planes. The P-38 delivered: it could fly 395 mph, when pressed, and travel 1,000 miles, though not at that speed.

Johnsonís plane had other unusual features: twin, liquid-cooled engines; a slim, centered spot in which the pilot could sit; two machine guns; and a 20-millimeter cannon. It could climb to dizzying heights at an unprecedented rate, and even came equipped with a mechanism that softened the engineís noise.

But the P-38 had its share of drawbacks, too, some of which caused fatalities. Its unusual design led to habitual locking of the controls, and pilots had to be specially trained to deal with this and other problems.

Because of irregularities in its temperature control system, pilots were often subjected to freezing cold temperatures, even when flying in hot climates.

These are the issues that led the RAF to dismiss its contract with Lockheed, but the Americans quickly stepped in after the attack on Pearl Harbour in December 1941.
Sometime, thinking late 43 or early 44, Hap Arnold sent a letter to his Air Force Commanders asking if they objected to cancelling the P-38/39/40. Gen. Kenny, Commander of the 5th Air Force, responded that he didn't object to cancelling the 39 & 40, but the 38 was essential for his Ops area. It could fly on 1 engine, vs a controlled crash, & the long range was needed because most of the S. W. Pacific Theater was vast oceans, jungled land & merciless Japs. He did say that they could cancell if a twin engine was developed with a decent % of top speed and range. This requirement was most likely why the "Twin Mustang" was created.
March 5th, 2022  
George
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinBritain
I read somewhere (or watched on TV) that the OSS used the Mosquito for operations contacting resistance fighters and groups on the run up to D Day. The OSS operator would be sitting on a long range fuel bladder in the fuselage.
There was a Bomb Squadron that worked for the OSS that had removed the ball turret and installed a hatch to facilitate dropping agents.
March 5th, 2022  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by George
There was a Bomb Squadron that worked for the OSS that had removed the ball turret and installed a hatch to facilitate dropping agents.
I take it you mean a B17 Squadron?

The RAF used a number of different types, including the Lysander, which would land in occupied France to drop off or pick up SOE agents and others, the Halifax was often used as well as the Whitley, Lockheed Hudson, Short Sterling, and C47

The Royal Air Force Special Duties (SD) Service was a secret air service created to provide air transport to support the resistance movement in Axis controlled territories. The service helped develop and support the resistance by bringing in agents, wireless operators and supplies. Parachute drop was the primary method by which the Special Duties units delivered supplies and most of the agents to the occupied countries. They also developed an air taxi service to pick up agents, political leaders and special communications from occupied Europe and bring them to England. On the outward flight the air taxi service also delivered agents and high value packages to France. Special Duties flights flew to target fields in Vichy France, Occupied France, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, and Greece. By the end of the war Special Duties units were also operating in the Far East. The air units were controlled by the Royal Air Force, and worked closely with the SOE and the SIS.
March 5th, 2022  
George
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinBritain
I take it you mean a B17 Squadron?
17s or 24s, probably 17s
March 5th, 2022  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by George
17s or 24s, probably 17s
Mostly B-24s, they removed the Liberators belly turret.

https://www.historynet.com/brave-b-2...ory-in-europe/
March 5th, 2022  
George
 
You'd think they would have used the YB-40, think they were abandoned.
March 6th, 2022  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by George
You'd think they would have used the YB-40, think they were abandoned.
Why?
On the whole it was a failure, it was to heavy to keep up with the bomber stream it was meant to protect and had all the same weaknesses.
 


Similar Topics
De Havilland Mosquito Original Film in action.
Seems NZ has a Mosquito infestation...
Mosquito and Cookies: A good combination?
Mosquito Restoration Project...
Mosquito Manual Free Download plus P-47 B-25 Videos