Macedonian phalanx to the Roman legion - Page 2




 
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April 1st, 2010  
antonpsarri
 
 
HI
I AM NEW MEMBER BUT I AM FROM GREECE.SO LET ME SHARE WITH YOU WHAT I THINK ABOUT .WHEN KING PYRUS(FROM THE GREEK KINGDOM OF EPIRUS) FIGHT AGAINST ROMAN EMPIRE HE USED ,MAINLY,THE FORM OF MECEDONIAN PHALANX (WITH SOME LITTLE DIFFERENCES).THE RESULT IS THAT HE NEVER LOOSE A SINGLE BATTLE.IF A FIND A REALETED LINK ABOUT THIS KING I WILL POST HERE.THANKS FOR THE HOST
April 2nd, 2010  
Czin
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by antonpsarri
HI
I AM NEW MEMBER BUT I AM FROM GREECE.SO LET ME SHARE WITH YOU WHAT I THINK ABOUT .WHEN KING PYRUS(FROM THE GREEK KINGDOM OF EPIRUS) FIGHT AGAINST ROMAN EMPIRE HE USED ,MAINLY,THE FORM OF MECEDONIAN PHALANX (WITH SOME LITTLE DIFFERENCES).THE RESULT IS THAT HE NEVER LOOSE A SINGLE BATTLE.IF A FIND A REALETED LINK ABOUT THIS KING I WILL POST HERE.THANKS FOR THE HOST
Please turn off your caps lock and keep your finger off the shift key. Thank you.
April 9th, 2010  
pendennis
 
 
As others have mentioned, the Roman legions were designed for flexibility.

Originally, the legions were designed for warfare in Italy. Italy, in many cases, has very uneven terrain. On this terrain, the phalanx would not operate with any type of efficiency. On the other hand, Greece, and areas in Asia Minor had large open areas, which enabled large masses of infantry to operate effectively, especially using cavalry on the wings. Phalanxes were easier to command, since troops were tightly packed, and operated mostly straight ahead.

The early Roman republican legions operated in three basic lines -
  • The Hastati were the lightest armed of the three lines. They carried a lightweight version of the pilum, and a short sword to engage in close fighting. They were lightly armored, if any, and were the youngest, least experienced.
  • The Principes were the in the next order. They were the primary infantry. They carried two pila, wore armor, and carried the "Spanish" sword.
  • The last were the Triarii. They were the most experienced and carried a heavier spear, designed for thrusting.
A latin phrase "ad triarios redisse" has survived. It translates as "To the third line", meaning a desperate situation.

The republican legions also had a number of Velites (very lightly armed), dispersed along the line at the area of most need.

The legions could operate on most any type of open ground. By design, the junior officers could operate with a bit of flexibility, giving them the ability to fill gaps, or take advantages of enemy weaknesses not seen from the legions' commanders.
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