Letters from Clarence F. Miller: Btry C 535th AAA Bn 1943 - 1945 - Page 6




 
--
 
December 2nd, 2014  
pgwenthold
 
(no envelope, not V-mail)
Belgium
Nov 1, 1944
Dear Friends
Well I guess I better answer your letter. I am sorry I didn’t answer sooner but you know how hard it is when one is busy. How is everyone there at your place? Fine I hope. I am OK, only I sure wish this war was over so I could get back to the states. I am tired of this country always seeing people & can’t speak to them very few can speak English & the boys aren’t supposed to talk to any one so it makes it kind a bad for the boys in a way.
I suppose you have a hard time trying to din hired help now that most of the boys are gone. Was there a lot of corn this year? If there as I suppose some people will be husking corn in the winter as long as the corn crop is still in the field. Do you have many hogs this year? What’s the price this fall? They sure haven’t been sending much pork over here. It has been a long time since I had good pork. We have a lot of bacon but it usually is so salty it is hard to eat it. I guess the cook don’t like to let it soak over night to get the salt out. The cook is got his troubles just like the rest of us. I sure wouldn’t want to job of being a cook. It is hard to please every one in the Army so a cook really has a hard time.
I received a letter from my mother & she said she was feeling a lot better. I was glad to hear that she was better. She works to hard & worries to much. I often told her that worrying never done any good, but I guess she can’t help it she is nervous & she also worries a lot. Well I guess I will have to close for now hopeing you all the best of Luck.
As ever a Friend
Clarence
M.


[Paul's Comment: the 535th is now in Belgium; it's been 3 months since the last letter in France; could be lost, or could be army responsibilities]
December 2nd, 2014  
pgwenthold
 
Cpl Clarence F. Miller
Btry C 535th AAA (AW) Bn
APO 230 of Postmaster
New York, NY
Postmark: US Army Postal Service APO Nov 24, 1944
Passed by: US Examiner ????7 (Lt ?? Harmony (this looks right))
Belgium
Nov 21, 1944
Dear Friends
I received your welcome letter so I will answer it while I have the time. The time sure does go fast here. It is almost Thanksgiving it don’t seem like I been gone from the US that long. But it won’t be long & it will be a year that I been over here.
I am glad to hear you had a good crop of corn this year. It will help with the war any way. There will be a lot of people to feed over in these countries. How much is corn per bushel this fall? I don’t think I could make very much money picking corn it would take me a day to pick a wagon box full. I have seen some good pickers while I was down there on my vacations in the good old days. I been wondering how much longer it will be before I can do that again. I don’t suppose it will be for a long time yet the way it looks now.
You asked if I knew Ed Huinker from Greenwood. Yes I use to know him when I was about 10 years old. But that was about 19 years ago I don’t believe I would know him now if I would see him. I went to school with his kids when we lived in Greenwood.
Well I think I will have to close for this time. I will try to write more next time.
As ever a Friend
Clarence

[Paul's comment: I don't have time to look into Ed Huinker right now; the name is familiar to me, though; a quick look shows he was my mom's great uncle]
December 2nd, 2014  
pgwenthold
 
Clarence F. Miller
535th AAA (AW) Bn
APO 230 of Postmaster
New York,NY
Postmark: US Army Postal Service APO Dec 2, 1944
Passed By US Army Examiner ???57 (signed by McHughes – very clear)
Airmail 6 cents

Dear Friends
I received your welcome letters & sure was glad to hear from you again. How is every thing with you? Fine I hope. I am OK, only tired of all this mud we have to put up with over here. I wish it would stay froze it sure would be a lot better if you would. Well this is Dec all ready & it won’t be long & it will be Xmas. Time sure goes fast don’t it? I sure hope next Xmas I can be home to enjoy it that is what most of us are waiting for. There may not be much left for us fellows when we get back but I think most of us will enjoy ourselves one way or another. The 4F may have there way now but we will have to change them when we get back. All I want is to start a home for myself & then I won’t care what happens. Just a place that is peaceful & quiet.
You asked how Marie likes it back home. Well she didn’t stay there long. Just long enough to help her folks get settled in their new home. She couldn’t find a good job so she went back to her old job in the foundry she was getting good wages so I can’t blame her. Well I suppose you have your fall work done now & can take it easy for the winter & get rested up for next summer. Well I guess I will close for now. Hopeing you the best of Luck & a Merry Xmas to you all.
As ever a Friend
Clarence
M.


[Paul's Comment: Belgium is muddy; he's really getting homesick. Another comment about Marie. She didn't stay long in Neillsville, and went back to the foundry in Milwaukee. Still no discussion of any issues between them]
--
December 2nd, 2014  
pgwenthold
 
OK, this is a history section, so maybe we can sort this out. Can we track the locations of his outfits now? So what was going on in the time they went from France to Belgium?

Note the date on the last letter, Dec 1. It's just a couple of weeks from the beginning of the Battle of the Bulge, and the Port of Antwerp is just opened up. Where was Btry C of the 535th at that point? Can anyone figure that out?

That is the end of the letters from Clarence in 1944. We'll have to wait to see what happens in 1945.
December 2nd, 2014  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgwenthold
OK, this is a history section, so maybe we can sort this out. Can we track the locations of his outfits now? So what was going on in the time they went from France to Belgium?

Note the date on the last letter, Dec 1. It's just a couple of weeks from the beginning of the Battle of the Bulge, and the Port of Antwerp is just opened up. Where was Btry C of the 535th at that point? Can anyone figure that out?

That is the end of the letters from Clarence in 1944. We'll have to wait to see what happens in 1945.

I know that on the 13th of December 1944 the 535th was in action around Krinkelt Belgium and at this point that were attached to the 99th Infantry Division (11 Dec 1944-9 May 1945).
December 2nd, 2014  
pgwenthold
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
I know that on the 13th of December 1944 the 535th was in action around Krinkelt Belgium and at this point that were attached to the 99th Infantry Division (11 Dec 1944-9 May 1945).
So is it correct to say that they were moved to Belgium to be part of the 99th infantry?

I don't know about military organization, so I'm just thinking that they were brought in to provide AAA support for the infantry. Is that at all in the realm of reality?
December 2nd, 2014  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgwenthold
So is it correct to say that they were moved to Belgium to be part of the 99th infantry?

I don't know about military organization, so I'm just thinking that they were brought in to provide AAA support for the infantry. Is that at all in the realm of reality?
It is correct to say that the 535th AAA show up in the 99th Infantry Divisions order of battle as being attached to that division from the 11th December 1944 until the end of the war.

Prior to that they were part of the 11th AAA group which shows up in the 70th Infantry Division order of battle.
December 2nd, 2014  
lljadw
 
Krinkelt is a borough of Rocherath/Büllingen in the north of the province of Liège at the German border and the US troops there received the full weight of the attack of the 6 SS Panzer Army in december 1944.
December 2nd, 2014  
JOC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljadw
Krinkelt is a borough of Rocherath/Büllingen in the north of the province of Liège at the German border and the US troops there received the full weight of the attack of the 6 SS Panzer Army in december 1944.
Wasn't the 6th Panzer army commanded by that criminal Sepp Dietrich .
December 2nd, 2014  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOC
Wasn't the 6th Panzer army commanded by that criminal Sepp Dietrich .
Nope I am pretty sure his title in December 1944 was SS-Oberst-Gruppenführer it wasn't until 1946 that he became a criminal but yes he did command the 6th SS Panzer Army.
 


Similar Topics
List of military movies