Legitmate Act of War or Warcrime? You decide. - Page 3




 
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October 23rd, 2008  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
BritinAfrica

Is this just Western troops or including Russian's?

It could include not only Western military POW's, but also civilians in Japanese hands. Thousands of Indian, Chinese and Malay civilian workers on the Burma Railway died of starvation, disease, beatings and maltreatment as did their military counterparts. Although I am not aware of the numbers of Russians in the hands of the Japanese. I need to do more research on this.


I dread to think of, not only the number of Allied POW's who died, but civilians who were worked to death, murdered, tortured and raped as they rampaged through the Far East.
October 23rd, 2008  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
As far as I am aware, only western troops. The Japanese had an intense hatred for westerners.
Yet the actual number of deaths at the hands of the Japanese was not all that different to the number of Germans that died in Russian captivity.
October 23rd, 2008  
BritinAfrica
 
 

Topic: Soviet POW's


From information I have gleaned, there were no Soviet POW's in Japanese hands during WW2. However, 500,000 to 600,000 Japanese were captured by the Soviets, 90% of which survived captivity. Quite a bit different to the Allied POW deaths in Japanese hands.
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October 23rd, 2008  
Del Boy
 
I personally worked closely with a number of ex-prisoners of the Japanese.
Some when I served, some in civvy street. I never came across outspoken hatred like it elswhere. Round about 1961 I made the mistake, at our works Xmas celebrations, of trying to persuade one of the guys of the virtues of forgiveness, letting go. Although I was his boss at the time, I got very short shrift from him, and quite rightly too; on that score, as on so many scores, I was a young idiot, wet behind the ears, despite my army and navy experiences.

The Japanese were cerainly the most hated by the military.
October 23rd, 2008  
perseus
 
 
Regarding the Japanese war antics, the following sounds incredulous, but the text is edited from "Weapons of Mass Destruction by Robert Hutchinson"

Quote:
The Japanese widely used biological weapons during WW2. There was one notorious unit called 731. These conducted experiments on civilians, combatants and prisoners of war including 3000 Allied prisoners of war (including US, UK, French, Australian). Some of these victims were tied to a stake and spayed with disease cultures such as gangrene, botulism, brucellosis and meningococcal infections. No prisoner was known to leave alive. No member of 731 was trialled in Western courts, but their experience was eagerly sought after in a similar way to the German rocket experts. A memorial tower to the unit stands in Tokyo.
October 24th, 2008  
Del Boy
 
That sounds par for the course. I remember that some of the returning guys suffered from unusual strange conditions on a permanent basis. My ORQMS in the early 50s was one such, a five year prisoner, and he was the only man in my battalion excused all parades, guards etc. On some of those occasions he became the photographer. A great soldier, immaculate and just about the most respected guy we had. He was also top to work for.
October 24th, 2008  
BritinAfrica
 
 

Topic: Japanese medical experiments


I found this site regarding the experiments carried out on US aircrew.

I cannot comment except to refer to an earlier posting I made, Too many Japanese got away scot free with war crimes.

http://www.centurychina.com/wiihist/germwar/uspow.htm.

While it was true that the Japanese were the most hated by the military, families of Japanese POWs had an even deeper hatred. My Grandfather, Grandmother and other family members would never buy anything made in Japan, my father still has a deep seated hatred of Japan and the Japanese. He often stated (and still does) that all Allied POWs should have been evacuated from Japan and bombed until the whole island sank beneath the sea.

As a young man I was shown a POW card from my uncle John, all I can remember is, the card was a yellow(ish) colour and a heading thats stated "Japanese Imperial Army"

and a line that simply said, "I am well"

Then his name rank and serial number.
October 24th, 2008  
perseus
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
From information I have gleaned, there were no Soviet POW's in Japanese hands during WW2.
Not according to Wiki, in fact there is quite a lot on unit 731 on there

MacArthur secretly granted immunity to the physicians of Unit 731 in exchange for providing America with their research on biological warfare.
(sounds about right).

Many Russian civilians, including women and children, and Soviet POWs held by Japan were killed in chemical and biological warfare experiments by Unit 731, along with Chinese, Koreans, Mongolians, and other nationalities. The trial of those captured Japanese perpetrators was held in Khabarovsk in December 1949. A lengthy partial transcript of the trial proceedings was published in different languages the following year by a Moscow foreign languages press, including an English language edition: Materials on the Trial of Former Servicemen of the Japanese Army Charged with Manufacturing and Employing Bacteriological Weapons (Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House, 1950). This book remains an invaluable resource for historians on the organization and activities of the Japanese biological warfare "death factory" lab-prisons. The lead prosecuting attorney at the Khabarovsk trial was Lev Smirnov, who had been one of the top Soviet prosecutors at the Nuremberg Trials.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731
October 25th, 2008  
BritinAfrica
 
 

Topic: Japanese medical experiments


Quote:
Originally Posted by perseus
Not according to Wiki, in fact there is quite a lot on unit 731 on there
Thanks for the site, I overlooked it.
December 22nd, 2008  
Mark Conley
 
 
I often wondered how the US Army Air Forces felt about the battle of the Bizmark Sea. heres a link to the story. please read at least to page 4, when you will incour another moral delima: strafing surviors in the water.

http://www.historynet.com/battle-of-...smarck-sea.htm

When the japaneese transports were sunk, the modified bombers were sent out to insure that no survivors reached land, but became fish food. a fictional account is in the book "Whip" by martin caiden. i always thought the martin caiden story was fiction, until i ran into an actual participant from the battle.

he summed it up very emotionally by saying "It was war. It was them or us in the south pacific at that time."

i believed him.
 


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