Legality/Ethics of (US) Commissioned Officer Commentary




 
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June 27th, 2004  
Iraq n Baq
 

Topic: Legality/Ethics of (US) Commissioned Officer Commentary


I'm in the process of writing something for my webpage in response to Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 7-11 propaganda film. This movie features a handful of uniformed (U.S.) Army officers and enlisted men bad-mouthing their command, the president and openly questioning our actions in Iraq. (Disgraceful if you ask me) I am under the impression that any such political speech is forbidden from a commissioned officer (possibly anyone wearing a uniform?) in the United States military. I cannot, however, find anything specific to that effect in any regulation or the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

Does anyone know where I might be able to find a quotable reference for this? Am I wrong?

Help me to fight the liberals!!!!

Also, what are your thoughts on this? Should members of the military have an obligation to support their chain of command? Or should they be allowed to openly criticize their orders and their commanders that gave those orders?

I feel that the military, and those serving in it, should be free of any partisan politics, and simply do their jobs. If they disagree with an action being taken, they can resign their commission, get queer and get out, or go to Canada. I don't want those in my Army who will openly question the orders they receive. Such people jeopardize the mission, their brothers and sisters in arms, and the support of the civilian populace. I want to depend on my fellow soldiers, and my subordinates to operate as ordered, and without concern for their own partisan position. After all, service is still voluntary - no one is forcing these men and women to serve. If they don't like it, they can get out.

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Sgt Slaughter
June 27th, 2004  
RnderSafe
 
 
Sec 888. ART. 88

Sec 934. ART. 134
June 27th, 2004  
SHERMAN
 
 
Hmmm....I think that it is against regulations. Are you sure they are real officers(It dosent say in little letters on the side of the screen "The Speakers are not Military Personnal"?).
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June 27th, 2004  
Iraq n Baq
 
Oh no, these were genuine (if you can call them that) officers on the ground in Iraq.
June 27th, 2004  
Iraq n Baq
 
And THANK YOU very much RnderSafe for the references. They will be quite handy. Drop by my website if you'd like to read a conservative's views on Micheal Moore's liberal propaganda film.
June 27th, 2004  
Koldun
 
 
I haven't seen the movie, and really had no intention of doing so.

However, now you have me intrigued. In 20 years of military service (both enlisted and as a commissioned officer), I never personally encountered a serving member of the US military who would openly go on record in such a manner.

It kind of makes me wonder where (and how) Moore got his footage.
June 29th, 2004  
Koldun
 
 
As much as I hate the idea of paying good money for it, I might have to go see the movie for myself. Someone told me that he noticed "something odd" about parts of it (including those interviews), but he couldn't put his finger on it.
June 30th, 2004  
c/Commander
 
 
For those of you on active duty in the military...is there a personnel record that these people can be checked against? Maybe a little anonymous tip to their branchs' JAG corps would be in order.
June 30th, 2004  
bush musketeer
 
 

Topic: Re: Legality/Ethics of (US) Commissioned Officer Commentary


Quote:
Originally Posted by Iraq n Baq
I'm in the process of writing something for my webpage in response to Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 7-11 propaganda film. This movie features a handful of uniformed (U.S.) Army officers and enlisted men bad-mouthing their command, the president and openly questioning our actions in Iraq. (Disgraceful if you ask me) I am under the impression that any such political speech is forbidden from a commissioned officer (possibly anyone wearing a uniform?) in the United States military. I cannot, however, find anything specific to that effect in any regulation or the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

Does anyone know where I might be able to find a quotable reference for this? Am I wrong?

Help me to fight the liberals!!!!

Also, what are your thoughts on this? Should members of the military have an obligation to support their chain of command? Or should they be allowed to openly criticize their orders and their commanders that gave those orders?

I feel that the military, and those serving in it, should be free of any partisan politics, and simply do their jobs. If they disagree with an action being taken, they can resign their commission, get queer and get out, or go to Canada. I don't want those in my Army who will openly question the orders they receive. Such people jeopardize the mission, their brothers and sisters in arms, and the support of the civilian populace. I want to depend on my fellow soldiers, and my subordinates to operate as ordered, and without concern for their own partisan position. After all, service is still voluntary - no one is forcing these men and women to serve. If they don't like it, they can get out.

____________
Sgt Slaughter

haven,t seen the movie but might to see what the gist of the argument is?
bad orders should be criticzed and so should bad commanders. especially if it save some of your fellow sodiers from getting shot by not following an order exactly. got to be flexible with orders because battleplans are subject to change without notice at times
July 1st, 2004  
Redneck
 
 

Topic: Re: Legality/Ethics of (US) Commissioned Officer Commentary


Quote:
Originally Posted by bush musketeer
haven,t seen the movie but might to see what the gist of the argument is?
bad orders should be criticzed and so should bad commanders. especially if it save some of your fellow sodiers from getting shot by not following an order exactly. got to be flexible with orders because battleplans are subject to change without notice at times




You do realize that you no longer belong to yourself when you voluntarily sign on the dotted line, right? You no longer enjoy the luxury of free speech, for example. As a serviceman or woman, you CANNOT undermine the chain of command by publicly criticizing you superiors or the actions of your nation, doing so is known as treason, as I believe someone else said around here somewhere.