Japanese surrender aircraft - Page 2




 
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September 7th, 2014  
George
 

One of the most attractive Japanese aircraft of the Second World War was the Mitsubishi Ki-46 Dinah. Here we see a Green Cross Dinah leaving the plateau airfield of Vunakanau, outside of Rabaul with a delegation to work out the details of the surrender of the Japanese Army and Navy to the Royal New Zealand Air Force at Jacquinot Bay, New Britain. The Japanese who painted this aircraft either misunderstood the order to paint out the Hinomaru marking or just plain couldn�t do it, as the aircraft carries both the red�meatball�and the Green Cross of surrender. Jacquinot Bay Airport (IATA: JAQ) is today an airport near Jacquinot Bay in the East New Britain Province on the island of New Britain in Papua New Guinea. The airstrip was liberated by the Australian Army in 1944. Following the Japanese surrender, several Japanese aircraft were flown from Vunakanau Airfield to Jacquinot Bay Airfield. Photo via Flickr







Another shot of the Ki-46 Dinah from the previous photograph�this time at her destination at the RNZAF field at Jacquinot Bay . In this photograph we can see much more clearly the dual markings of aggression and surrender. Photo via Woody01 atKiwisim.net.nz
September 7th, 2014  
George
 


A photo of two hangared Green Cross aircraft, possibly at Seletar Airfield in Singapore . The one in the foreground is a Mitsubishi Ki-57Topsy, while the larger aircraft (likely also in Green Cross markings) at the back is a Showa/Nakajima L2D, called a Tabby by the Allies. The Tabby was a license-built copy (with modifications like the extra cockpit windows) of the Douglas DC-3, though it is unlikely that the Japanese continued to pay the license fee once the war started. Photo viaaviationofjapan.comand Tadeusz Januszewski



Another photo from Seletar , Singapore , showing a Mitsubishi G3M Nell and another Tabby aircraft of the Imperial Japanese Navy�s 13th Air Fleet. The Nell, one of Japan�s earliest heavy bombers (introduced in 1935) was also a transport aircraft like this variant. From 1943, most of the remainingNells served as glider tugs, aircrew and paratroop trainers and for transporting high-ranking officers and VIPs between home islands, occupied territories and combat fronts until the end of the war. Note the blunt-looking forward turret which was retractable, but is extended in this shot. It was conside red too�draggy�and was rarely extended. Photo viaaviationofjapan.comand Tadeusz Januszewski
September 7th, 2014  
George
 

An entire flight line in Matsuyama airfield on Formosa (now Taiwan ) wears Green Cross markings, including several Mitsubishi Ki-67 Hiryu (Flying Dragon) heavy bombers. Photo viaijaafphotos.com



Two Japanese Green Cross aircraft at Labuan�an island off the coast of Borneo in East Malaysia . The Mitsubishi Ki.21 heavy bomber aircraft (allied code-name Sally) (left) has been painted white with a green surrender cross, and was used to transport Japanese prisoners for trial between Borneo and Labuan . This aircraft was probably the Sally which was flown to Australia in February 1946, having been nicknamed Tokyo Rose. The Tachikawa Ki.54 transport aircraft (allied code-nameHickory) (right) has not been painted white but its hinomaru fuselage marking has been transformed with a white surrender cross over the red circle and the wings carry white crosses next to the red meatballs. The Hickory was used to fly Lieutenant General Masao Baba, Commander of the Japanese 37th Army and Supreme Commander of the Japanese Forces in Borneo, to surrender at Labuan . Photo via Australian War Memorial



The same Tachikawa Ki.54 Hickory as in the previous photo is a good example of surrender markings being either misinterpreted or simply ignored. It sports a white surrender cross over its fuselage Hinomarus and a white cross side by side with the meatballs under the wings. Photo via Australian War Memorial
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September 7th, 2014  
Remington 1858
 
 
Thank you for this extremely interesting and rare view into a little known event of military history. This why people come to this site.
September 8th, 2014  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remington 1858
Thank you for this extremely interesting and rare view into a little known event of military history. This why people come to this site.
Indeed it is an excellent write up of the event.
September 8th, 2014  
JOC
 
 
George a very interesting pictorial - write-up of this aerial surrender. Personally I never knew it happened this way. It's interesting to see a few appeared to have the rising sun and the surrender cross.
September 8th, 2014  
George
 
This is all from a massive E Mail I got from a buddy. 4 times too big for a single post. Now I can only copy short sections. Here's another.



In the background, RNZAF ground crew work on one of the three Jacquinot Bay Zeros, while in the foreground we see one chocked and waiting for a test flight perhaps. Photo via Woody01 atKiwisim.net.nz





RNZAF ground crew inspect and work on one of the Green Cross Zeros surrendered at Jacquinot Bay, New Britain . Photo via Woody01 atKiwisim.net.nz
 


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