Japanese brutal killed and torture European POWS during the world war 2. - Page 7




 
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October 11th, 2012  
udaka
 
Another point, Like some people of west countries always clamo: "they will resist the products made in China ." I want to laugh when I heard
these words. Is it practical ?




I beg you stop buy products made in China. If no made in China. The Consumer Goods prices of the world market will rise up three times at lest.Even the Wal-mart will shut down. So many consumers in many countries will pay more moneys to buy stuffs. Like the USA invent the television, But nowday Ameican people would not produce one television in American factories. China had made 118 millions televisions in 2010.





Of course, with Chinese workers salary rise up rapidly. The west companies who imvest in China mainlands complains their business cost rise very fast!
But If they don't want invest in China mainland! The west companies can move their moneys to other countries, like Philippines, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam,Myanmar or African countries. We don't care really.
October 12th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
I'm not defending the Japanese point of view but one must take it into account.
Why? The bastards signed the Geneva Convention and then ignored it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
They viewed surrenderers as cowards. Not many Japs surrendered, fighting men that is. Their point of view is in our point of view unacceptable, but we won and could force it upon them. If it would have been the way around maybe some families would be ashamed of a member that surrendered.
What is more cowardly then inflicting torture and murdering unarmed POW's? When Singapore was handed to the Japs by General Percival, British nurses were herded into the sea at Changi and machine gunned by brave Jap troops.
Then there is the rape of Nanking, where hundreds of thousands of unarmed and innocent civilians were raped and or murdered, those poor buggers didn't surrender.

Have you seen newsreel of Japs returning home after surrendering and being greeted by family members? Not very ashamed at all.

You have obviously never talked to ex Jap POW's or never lost a family member due to the disgusting treatment handed out to them by the muderous bastards.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
About forgotten and/or unknown. It all depends on what you know. How many heroes are unknown? (the battle for Keren ao).
What?
October 12th, 2012  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
It is interesting why we are focusing so much on the holocaust and other atrocities committed in Europe during the Second World War and I prefer to think we (Europeans) ignore the atrocities committed by the Japanese forces in China and other countries in Asia. Why are we doing that? If I speculate; I think the atrocities in Europe were so enormous so there are very little left for the atrocities in Asia. There are other factors as well, in the post WWII world with the emerging Cold War and the perceptions of a third war in Europe might contributed to it as well. One major factor is China itself; China was not a part of the world community until Nixon recognized China (Taiwan/Formosa hold the Chinese seat in the UN)

When I am thinking about how much we studied the Second World War in elementary school, it was very little about the Pacific and Asia. I have a question to the Americans, are you divided 50/50 between Europe and Asia when you are studying the Second World War?
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October 12th, 2012  
VDKMS
 
Let me first say that any atrocity by anyone must be condemned.

But what disturbs me is double standards. When we look at modern wars (Afghanistan, Iraq) the West gets the blame for the atrocities although most casualties were NOT caused by the Western powers but by the locals.

When locals mutilate Western troops (Iraq, Somalia) they say that they shouldn't be there.

But when we talk about WWII (Japs, Germans), it's the way around.

When someone who is "brainwashed" (from childhood - madrassa) detonates his suicide vest on a marketplace he is a freedom fighter. When a WWII Jap (brainwashed from childhood - bushido) mutilates allied soldiers he's an animal.

Ever thought how YOU would have acted if you would have been following bushido rules from childhood?

Don't get me wrong, I don't approve their actions but just think about what I said in the former sentence.



@udaka

Your country sells weapons to the Sudanese regime and they use it to attack innocent civilians (Darfur) and during their civil war.

Quote:
But If they don't want invest in China mainland! The west companies can move their moneys to other countries, like Philippines, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam,Myanmar or African countries. We don't care really.
They are already doing that. More and more western companies make products in China only for the Chinese market. Do not forget that Western companies are not allowed to invest in China without a Chinese partner. Which is in fact a violation of the WTO if I'm not mistaken.
October 12th, 2012  
George
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
When Singapore was handed to the Japs by General Percival, British nurses were herded into the sea at Changi and machine gunned by brave Jap troops.
In Hong Kong they were raped to death.
October 13th, 2012  
udaka
 
China had military corporate with many Asian and African countries, like Sudanese regime, and later the countries outbreak civil war. It is the fault of China? If China sell weapons to Saudi Arab and Epygt, and later these countries out break civil war. It should blame Chinese? Don't forget the USA and Russia (soviet union) are two biggest weapons exports. They amount of 80% sales of arms world market.
In many countries civil war,we
can see people use the US standars arms and Soviet standars arms kill each other, in the Asian and African and latain countries.

Why the Eurpeaons don't rethink their atrocities in Irap and Afghanistan, they bombed and invade the two countries,cause numerous local people dead, Some American soldiers rape the women of Iraq. (There are some pictures on the internet show as evidence)

now Caucacians accuse the locals, say they should not fight back the New Nazi. Ha ,ha ha ,yes ,that is double standars.


[QUOTE=VDKMS;639537]Let me first say that any atrocity by anyone must be condemned.

But what disturbs me is double standards. When we look at modern wars (Afghanistan, Iraq) the West gets the blame for the atrocities although most casualties were NOT caused by the Western powers but by the locals.

@udaka
Your country sells weapons to the Sudanese regime and they use it to attack innocent civilians (Darfur) and during their civil war.
October 13th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
When someone who is "brainwashed" (from childhood - madrassa) detonates his suicide vest on a marketplace he is a freedom fighter. When a WWII Jap (brainwashed from childhood - bushido) mutilates allied soldiers he's an animal.
Again you are talking absolute bollocks, and yes he is a F*&%ing animal.

Again you don't know what the hell you are talking about.

There are 8 rules of Bushido,

I. Rectitude or Justice

Bushido refers not only to martial rectitude, but to personal rectitude: Rectitude or Justice, is the strongest virtue of Bushido. A well-known samurai defines it this way: ‘Rectitude is one’s power to decide upon a course of conduct in accordance with reason, without wavering; to die when to die is right, to strike when to strike is right.’ Another speaks of it in the following terms: ‘Rectitude is the bone that gives firmness and stature. Without bones the head cannot rest on top of the spine, nor hands move nor feet stand. So without Rectitude neither talent nor learning can make the human frame into a samura.

II. Courage

Bushido distinguishes between bravery and courage: Courage is worthy of being counted among virtues only if it’s exercised in the cause of Righteousness and Rectitude. In his Analects, Confucius says: ‘Perceiving what is right and doing it not reveals a lack of Courage.’ In short, ‘Courage is doing what is right.’

III. Benevolence or Mercy

A man invested with the power to command and the power to kill was expected to demonstrate equally extraordinary powers of benevolence and mercy: Love, magnanimity, affection for others, sympathy and pity, are traits of Benevolence, the highest attribute of the human soul. Both Confucius and Mencius often said the highest requirement of a ruler of men is Benevolence.


IV. Politeness

Discerning the difference between obsequiousness and politeness can be difficult for casual visitors to Japan, but for a true man, courtesy is rooted in benevolence: Courtesy and good manners have been noticed by every foreign tourist as distinctive Japanese traits. But Politeness should be the expression of a benevolent regard for the feelings of others; it’s a poor virtue if it’s motivated only by a fear of offending good taste. In its highest form Politeness approaches love.

V. Honesty and Sincerity

True samurai, according to author Nitobe, disdained money, believing that “men must grudge money, for riches hinder wisdom.” Thus children of high-ranking samurai were raised to believe that talking about money showed poor taste, and that ignorance of the value of different coins showed good breeding: Bushido encouraged thrift, not for economical reasons so much as for the exercise of abstinence. Luxury was thought the greatest menace to manhood, and severe simplicity was required of the warrior class … the counting machine and abacus were abhorred.

VI. Honor

Though Bushido deals with the profession of soldiering, it is equally concerned with non-martial behavior: The sense of Honor, a vivid consciousness of personal dignity and worth, characterized the samurai. He was born and bred to value the duties and privileges of his profession. Fear of disgrace hung like a sword over the head of every samurai … To take offense at slight provocation was ridiculed as ‘short-tempered.’ As the popular adage put it: ‘True patience means bearing the unbearable.’

VII. Loyalty

Economic reality has dealt a blow to organizational loyalty around the world. Nonetheless, true men remain loyal to those to whom they are indebted: Loyalty to a superior was the most distinctive virtue of the feudal era. Personal fidelity exists among all sorts of men: a gang of pickpockets swears allegiance to its leader. But only in the code of chivalrous Honor does Loyalty assume paramount importance.

VIII. Character and Self-Control

Bushido teaches that men should behave according to an absolute moral standard, one that transcends logic. What’s right is right, and what’s wrong is wrong. The difference between good and bad and between right and wrong are givens, not arguments subject to discussion or justification, and a man should know the difference. Finally, it is a man’s obligation to teach his children moral standards through the model of his own behavior: The first objective of samurai education was to build up Character. The subtler faculties of prudence, intelligence, and dialectics were less important. Intellectual superiority was esteemed, but a samurai was essentially a man of action. No historian would argue that Hideyoshi personified the Eight Virtues of Bushido throughout his life. Like many great men, deep faults paralleled his towering gifts. Yet by choosing compassion over confrontation, and benevolence over belligerence, he demonstrated ageless qualities of manliness. Today his lessons could not be more timely.

Besides which, how many Jap troops who committed those disgusting acts on defenceless POW's and civilians were samurai? They weren't, they were vicious thugs.

Recent scholarship in both Japan and abroad has focused on differences between the samurai class and the bushidō theories that developed in modern Japan. Bushidō in the prewar period was often emperor-centered and placed much greater value on the virtues of loyalty and self-sacrifice than did many Tokugawa-era interpretations. Bushidō was used as a propaganda tool by the government and military, who doctored it to suit their needs.

More recently, it has been argued that modern bushidō discourse originated in the 1880s as a response to foreign stimuli, such as the English concept of "gentlemanship," by Japanese with considerable exposure to Western culture. Nitobe Inazo's bushidō interpretations followed a similar trajectory, although he was following earlier trends. This relatively pacifistic bushidō was then hijacked and adapted by militarists and the government from the early 1900s onward as nationalism increased around the time of the Russo-Japanese War.

Denials of mistreatment of prisoners of war declared that they were being well-treated by virtue of bushido generosity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
Ever thought how YOU would have acted if you would have been following bushido rules from childhood?
If I had been following bushido rules from childhood as set out above, I wouldn't have been slaughtering unarmed POW's, or murdering unarmed civilians.

Your continued defence and making excuses for the actions of vicious thugs and animals is quite frankly sickening.
October 13th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by George
In Hong Kong they were raped to death.
Not only that George, defenceless wounded troops were bayoneted in their beds at the British Military Hospital by the brave Jap army.
October 13th, 2012  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
Again you are talking absolute bollocks, and yes he is a F*&%ing animal.

Again you don't know what the hell you are talking about.

There are 8 rules of Bushido,

I. Rectitude or Justice

Bushido refers not only to martial rectitude, but to personal rectitude: Rectitude or Justice, is the strongest virtue of Bushido. A well-known samurai defines it this way: ‘Rectitude is one’s power to decide upon a course of conduct in accordance with reason, without wavering; to die when to die is right, to strike when to strike is right.’ Another speaks of it in the following terms: ‘Rectitude is the bone that gives firmness and stature. Without bones the head cannot rest on top of the spine, nor hands move nor feet stand. So without Rectitude neither talent nor learning can make the human frame into a samura.

II. Courage

Bushido distinguishes between bravery and courage: Courage is worthy of being counted among virtues only if it’s exercised in the cause of Righteousness and Rectitude. In his Analects, Confucius says: ‘Perceiving what is right and doing it not reveals a lack of Courage.’ In short, ‘Courage is doing what is right.’

III. Benevolence or Mercy

A man invested with the power to command and the power to kill was expected to demonstrate equally extraordinary powers of benevolence and mercy: Love, magnanimity, affection for others, sympathy and pity, are traits of Benevolence, the highest attribute of the human soul. Both Confucius and Mencius often said the highest requirement of a ruler of men is Benevolence.


IV. Politeness

Discerning the difference between obsequiousness and politeness can be difficult for casual visitors to Japan, but for a true man, courtesy is rooted in benevolence: Courtesy and good manners have been noticed by every foreign tourist as distinctive Japanese traits. But Politeness should be the expression of a benevolent regard for the feelings of others; it’s a poor virtue if it’s motivated only by a fear of offending good taste. In its highest form Politeness approaches love.

V. Honesty and Sincerity

True samurai, according to author Nitobe, disdained money, believing that “men must grudge money, for riches hinder wisdom.” Thus children of high-ranking samurai were raised to believe that talking about money showed poor taste, and that ignorance of the value of different coins showed good breeding: Bushido encouraged thrift, not for economical reasons so much as for the exercise of abstinence. Luxury was thought the greatest menace to manhood, and severe simplicity was required of the warrior class … the counting machine and abacus were abhorred.

VI. Honor

Though Bushido deals with the profession of soldiering, it is equally concerned with non-martial behavior: The sense of Honor, a vivid consciousness of personal dignity and worth, characterized the samurai. He was born and bred to value the duties and privileges of his profession. Fear of disgrace hung like a sword over the head of every samurai … To take offense at slight provocation was ridiculed as ‘short-tempered.’ As the popular adage put it: ‘True patience means bearing the unbearable.’

VII. Loyalty

Economic reality has dealt a blow to organizational loyalty around the world. Nonetheless, true men remain loyal to those to whom they are indebted: Loyalty to a superior was the most distinctive virtue of the feudal era. Personal fidelity exists among all sorts of men: a gang of pickpockets swears allegiance to its leader. But only in the code of chivalrous Honor does Loyalty assume paramount importance.

VIII. Character and Self-Control

Bushido teaches that men should behave according to an absolute moral standard, one that transcends logic. What’s right is right, and what’s wrong is wrong. The difference between good and bad and between right and wrong are givens, not arguments subject to discussion or justification, and a man should know the difference. Finally, it is a man’s obligation to teach his children moral standards through the model of his own behavior: The first objective of samurai education was to build up Character. The subtler faculties of prudence, intelligence, and dialectics were less important. Intellectual superiority was esteemed, but a samurai was essentially a man of action. No historian would argue that Hideyoshi personified the Eight Virtues of Bushido throughout his life. Like many great men, deep faults paralleled his towering gifts. Yet by choosing compassion over confrontation, and benevolence over belligerence, he demonstrated ageless qualities of manliness. Today his lessons could not be more timely.

Besides which, how many Jap troops who committed those disgusting acts on defenceless POW's and civilians were samurai? They weren't, they were vicious thugs.

Recent scholarship in both Japan and abroad has focused on differences between the samurai class and the bushidō theories that developed in modern Japan. Bushidō in the prewar period was often emperor-centered and placed much greater value on the virtues of loyalty and self-sacrifice than did many Tokugawa-era interpretations. Bushidō was used as a propaganda tool by the government and military, who doctored it to suit their needs.

More recently, it has been argued that modern bushidō discourse originated in the 1880s as a response to foreign stimuli, such as the English concept of "gentlemanship," by Japanese with considerable exposure to Western culture. Nitobe Inazo's bushidō interpretations followed a similar trajectory, although he was following earlier trends. This relatively pacifistic bushidō was then hijacked and adapted by militarists and the government from the early 1900s onward as nationalism increased around the time of the Russo-Japanese War.

Denials of mistreatment of prisoners of war declared that they were being well-treated by virtue of bushido generosity.



If I had been following bushido rules from childhood as set out above, I wouldn't have been slaughtering unarmed POW's, or murdering unarmed civilians.

Your continued defence and making excuses for the actions of vicious thugs and animals is quite frankly sickening.
I'm not defending it I'm trying to understand it.

And I do know what I'm talking about:Mistreatment of POW's an Old Story

Quote:
"Japan's particularly abhorrent record of mistreating POWs stemmed in part from its samurai-based warrior code, called "bushido," in which surrender was deemed dishonorable.

That code led to such incidents as the execution of eight American fliers captured at the South Pacific island of Chichi Jima in 1944, a story told in James Bradley's 2003 best seller, "Flyboys.""
or this one : The Origins of the Samurai and Bushido Codes
October 14th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
I'm not defending it I'm trying to understand it.

And I do know what I'm talking about:Mistreatment of POW's an Old Story



or this one : The Origins of the Samurai and Bushido Codes
I ask again, how many rank and file Jap soldiers were Samurai? Therefore the so called Bushido codes do not apply. And as mentioned the 3rd Bushido code mentions:-

III. Benevolence or Mercy

A man invested with the power to command and the power to kill was expected to demonstrate equally extraordinary powers of benevolence and mercy: Love, magnanimity, affection for others, sympathy and pity, are traits of Benevolence, the highest attribute of the human soul. Both Confucius and Mencius often said the highest requirement of a ruler of men is Benevolence.

Not only that "Bushidō was used as a propaganda tool by the government and military, who doctored it to suit their needs."

There are no excuses for what the vicious bastards did to Allied POW's and civilians, they are nothing but cowards and bullies able to commit untold atrocities unarmed people, people incapable of fighting back. Try reading the story of the Sandekan Death Marches where my uncle along with other seriously ill British and Australians were murdered by Japanese guards. Look up FEPOW and read the stories of victims of the Japanese and their families.
 


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