Italian Cruise Ship Disaster and Crew




 
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Boots
 
January 18th, 2012  
perseus
 
 

Topic: Italian Cruise Ship Disaster and Crew


Sorry to stereotype here, but the 'show-off', disorganised and cowardy nature of the Captain and perhaps some of the officers hasn't exactly helped the image of Italian officials has it?

After deviating off his official course to salute a friend, the ship collided with the rocky seabed, then the evacuation was delayed so much until the boat was on such an angle so some of the lifeboats couldn't be launched, then he proceeded to look after number one and get off. Here is the dialogue with the coastguard after he got on land leaving hundreds of passengers on the upturned hull.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...assengers.html

And this would be funny if not so tragic

Quote:
The captain of the crippled Costa Concordia cruise ship, Francesco Schettino, has reportedly said the reason he was in a life boat while thousands of panic-stricken passengers and crew were trying to evacuate was because he “tripped” and fell into the rescue craft.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...life-boat.html
January 18th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
I am not sure this is anything out of the ordinary I get the impression of the Captain going down with the ship has been a thing of the past for quite a while, if you recall there was the case of the Greek cruise liner who's Captain and crew abandoned ship off South Africa without even notifying passengers.

Had it not been for the actions of the ships entertainment staff organising the rescue effort they would have had a massive catastrophe.

http://www.oceanossinking.com/

Hell we are still cleaning up the mess of a cargo ship that felt it necessary to ram a marked reef at full speed and then tamper with documentation to try and hide wrong doing.

Essentially it seems you may need to jump through hoops to get a drivers license or a pilots license but they will let any idiot captain a ship.
January 18th, 2012  
perseus
 
 
History repeats itself
Quote:
British dancer acted as a human climbing frame to help terrified passengers off the Costa Concordia.
James Thomas, 19, who was working on the ship, used his 6ft 3in frame to bridge the gap between two of the decks. Dozens of passengers clambered over him to get into lifeboats.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...l#ixzz1joV6prW
Quote:
Eight British dancers were on-board the boat and were among the last to leave the sinking vessel, with many staying behind to help others to safety........'I went off to help calm the passengers and do a roll-call. People then started going into the boats.'As the ship eventually began to list uncontrollably, she and four colleagues who stayed on board used a water hose to tie themselves to a handrail before being rescued by an Italian air force helicopter.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz1joWJObzL
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Boots
January 18th, 2012  
Botak
 
 
Well the audio of the Coast Guard official telling him to get his ass back on the ship isn't a good look....
January 18th, 2012  
perseus
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
I am not sure this is anything out of the ordinary I get the impression of the Captain going down with the ship has been a thing of the past for quite a while, if you recall there was the case of the Greek cruise liner who's Captain and crew abandoned ship off South Africa without even notifying passengers.
The official rules are listed here

Quote:
The current version, passed in 1974, does not specify that the captain should stay with his ship but states that the captain, or master, has the ultimate authority aboard his ship.

In addition, it says all passenger ships must have a system for emergency management, which would set out who is responsible for what during an emergency situation. This may or may not stipulate that the captain has to be the last to leave.

"It depends what was written on the plan," says a spokesman for the IMO.
The details of the Costa Concordia's emergency plan have not been made public. But Jans-Uwe Schroder-Hinrichs, the head of the maritime safety and environmental administration programme at the World Maritime University in Sweden and a former master mariner, says that it is understood within the industry that captain needs to stay on board to direct the evacuation.

"How would a captain fulfil his obligations if he was not on board? Emergency responses are nearly almost always co-ordinated from the ship - you have fairly limited options for getting necessary information from a lifeboat," he says.

There is also the question of Italian common law. In Italy, a captain who abandons his ship before it sinks while passengers are still aboard, may faces charges for failing in their duty of care, Mr Phillips says.
Article 1097 of Italy's Maritime Law says: "If the commander does not leave last, he risks two years in jail; if the vessel is lost 2-8 years; if the boat is used to carry people - 3-12 years."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16611371

Seems we can't lay all the blame the Captain as well, since the company approved a previous sailby to the island which was even closer (in parts) than this last one!

Costa Concordia: Ship's previous close pass of Giglio

Quote:
18 January 2012 Last updated at 09:54

The Costa Concordia sailed closer to Giglio island last August than it did on Friday, according to satellite tracking information given to the BBC by the shipping journal, Lloyd's List Intelligence.

Lloyd's List told the BBC's Newsnight programme the vessel passed within 230m of the island on 14 August 2011 to mark La Notte di San Lorenzo - the night of the shooting stars festival on the island.

Amateur footage from the island shows the cruise ship as it passed the island last year.

Joe Lynam reports
Joe Lynam reports
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-16607837
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-16583187
January 18th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Yes well in this case he needs to have the book thrown at him, losing a ship with that many people on board is one thing, losing it while show boating is another thing and losing it while show boating and then abandoning it and leaving everyone to their fate is something else altogether.

On the brighter side if I ever take another cruise I am going to follow the entertainment staff around in case of an emergency as they seem to be the only ones with enough balls to organise rescues.
January 18th, 2012  
Yossarian
 
 
And even bigger problem than the blame game exsist now with the vessel itself.

Now that the passengers and crew who survived (Thankfully a vast majority) are safe.

Another question looms ahead, with the ship perched on a rocky outcrop below the surface.

The question remains what about all that oil and fuel still in her tanks? The problem that may soon be faced is what happens when you pump that fuel out...

Thus lightening the ship as such may cause it to slide further beneath the waves before the pumping process is complete. (All 2380 tons of it.)

Although images of Naval Vessels that have been heavily struck being salvaged and carried back to port abound, such as the Recent Korean incident and the mine damage to American naval vessels in the Persian Gulf. (although sometimes only half the vessel remained above water.).

This ship has a displacment of over 100,000 tons, a problem such as this doesn't bring to my mind the ill fated steamliner Titanic, but the beached images of the Torry Canyon as she eventually was reclaimed by the sea, with a little help of ordance from the Ministry of Defense of course.

With the Concordia in such close proximity to a small port village, such an option here is not possible.
January 19th, 2012  
Big_Z
 
 
I was in the sandwich shop today waiting on my food and they had fox news on. The tv was on mute but I seen the turned over ship with the news captions at the bottom. It read "ship captain claims he fell into a lifeboat after tripping from the ship being tilted at a 70% angle" I laughed.
January 19th, 2012  
perseus
 
 


I think it is just over 100,000 tonnes. Many experts think it is a write off, but if they did salvage it.


January 19th, 2012  
perseus
 
 
Quote:
I am going to follow the entertainment staff around in case of an emergency as they seem to be the only ones with enough balls to organise rescues.
It's certainly a good excuse to follow the dancing girls into the changing rooms.

I would certainly be up there with my lifejacket rather than waiting in my cabin for the Captain to abandon ship. This timeline demonstates his state of Denial

Quote:
The ship hit the shoal at 21:45 (local time). What follow is from the official transcript of the communications of the Port Authority.

22:26: after the initial denial of the situation, the Captain reports to the Port Authority about the gash and that the ship was tilting but still not asking for assistance.

22:34 Captain asks for assistance.

22:58 abandon ship signal while the ship is only moderately tilted.

23:23 the Captain reports of increasing tilting.

00:12 evacuation still proceeding from both sides of the ship; first difficulties on the left side.

00:32 first report of people overboard.

00:42 the Captain and (he says, but it's not true) all the officials have left the ship
 


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