ISO info on Nagasaki's strategic value in WW2




 
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August 22nd, 2004  
chilehed
 

Topic: ISO info on Nagasaki's strategic value in WW2


Iíve recently overheard discussions on the ethics of war, and would like to improve my understanding of the bombing of Nagasaki. I know that the city was a major seaport with a significant industrial capacity, but I want details.

Can anyone suggest where I can find period maps of auto and rail roads, major electrical and fuel transmission lines, the specific locations of the various industrial sites in the city, type and tonnage of goods produced, etc.?

Iíd also like to understand the limitations of aerial targeting at the time: given a specific target of size X, how many missions would it typically take to destroy it, how many tons of ordnance would be expended, what would be the size of the area affected by the attacks, etc.

Of course, if thereís already a good analysis of this somewhere that would be even better.

Iím tired of not having a better response than ďNo, it was a big seaport with lots of industry.Ē

Thanks.
August 22nd, 2004  
Mark Conley
 
 
http://www.nuclearfiles.org/redocume...g-survey1.html

try this. its an offical strategic bombing survey that dealt with both atomic weapons on japan.

hope it helps.
August 23rd, 2004  
GuyontheRight
 
Kind of off subject, but I heard Nagasaki was also the main center of Christian influence In Japan, is that true?
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August 23rd, 2004  
Mark Conley
 
 
yes guyonright, its true..but only from the prospective that it was originally the only area where christianity was allowed in japan (whole island) for hundreds of years following the original Shoguns decree that Japan was to be isolated from foreign influence. Nagasaki was chosen because it was a northern seaport that would not interfere with the silk trade with china, that was managed by the foreign interests settled there (remember, china and japan did not really get along with each other, especially after the chinese tried to invade japan, but failed due to the weather for the most part.) Japanese people wanted the silk, due to its properties for comfortable clothing: but could not duplicate the technology required to make it: ( closely guarded secret of the chinese) chinese wanted the gold: the foreign merchants acted as the intermediarys to transact both..the middle men.

Well, with christianity..it was first tolerated, then seen as danger to the tradition of obedience to the feudal lords and emperor, as a christian dictate obedience to a higher lord. Couldn't put the genie back into the bottle..but were able to keep the christians in one place, so the religion could not make anymore converts.

Now, the fact that this area was predominately christian: what does that have to do with the reason for nagasaki as a target or strategic site for bombing?

August 23rd, 2004  
GuyontheRight
 
Bothing, In fact It makes a case against the bombing of that particular city from a Western Standpoint. I just wanted to confirm what I heard In a conversation that was centered around the city.