Iraq Asks for Korea’s T-50 Trainer Jets




 
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March 15th, 2009  
rock45
 

Topic: Iraq Asks for Korea’s T-50 Trainer Jets


Iraq Asks for Korea’s T-50 Trainer Jets
T-50 trainer jet
By Kim Jae-kyoung
Staff Reporter

Korea is expected to export T-50 Golden Eagles to Iraq, as the Middle Eastern country seeks to import Korea's advanced trainer jets as part of efforts to rebuild its war-torn army.

The deal is expected to pave the way for Korea to supply next-generation military jet trainers to other countries, demonstrating its superiority over rival jets, such as the M-346 by Italy's Alenia Aermacchi.

Iraq's official request for the acquisition of T-50 trainer jets was made during the Korea-Iraq summit in Seoul on Feb. 24, in which the two countries struck a $3.55-billion deal to develop oil reserves in southern Iraq and construct social infrastructure in Iraq.

At the summit, President Lee Myung-bak and Iraqi President Jalal Talabani signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to give South Korean firms the right to participate in rebuilding projects in Iraq.

``When the MOU was signed in late February, Talabani asked Lee to sell T-50 trainer jets and other advanced communication equipment to the Middle Eastern country,'' a source close to the deal told The Korea Times, asking not to be named. A briefing on the T-50, which can be converted to light fighters, was given to the Iraqi president.

``Once the terms and conditions of the sale, including prices, are met, they agreed to include them in a binding contract,'' he added.

In January, Iraqi Defense Minister Abdul-Qader al-Obeidi visited Seoul to inspect the T-50 and said that a defense expert in his entourage had test-flown the jet in Korea and expressed satisfaction.

Currently, Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI), Korea's only aerospace firm, is drawing up a sales proposal for Iraq, based on which the two countries will start negotiations, according to the source. When contacted, the KAI refused to comment on the deal.

``Since Iraq lost many of its trainer jets following the U.S. military attack against the country, the Middle Eastern nation is eager to purchase high-quality jets to rebuild its army and air force,'' the source said. `` Iraq acknowledged that the T-50 has high quality for its price.''

Given that the negotiations will be carried out on the sidelines of the MOU signed between the heads of the two states, the chances are that the deal will be carried out in the form of either a non-bidding contract or a barter trade.

During his four-day state visit, Talibani agreed to allow Korean firms to develop oil reserves in Iraq's Basra region, where most Iraqi oil is produced. In return, Seoul will help build power plants and other forms of public infrastructure.

Baghdad plans to spend some $150 billion on rehabilitation projects over the next eight years. Seoul hopes more South Korean businesses will be able to have more opportunities there.

The source said that once it gets oil fields in the Basra region, Korea will have access to an additional 100,000 to 200,000 barrel per day. Currently, the country has only 60,000 barrels available per day.

The news that Iraq wants Korea's supersonic jets came a month after KAI failed to win a contract to supply the T-50 supersonic trainer to the UAE. The UAE selected the M-346 as the preferred aircraft in the $1.3-billion deal, which included the building of 48 jets.

A T-50's flyaway cost is set at 20 to 25 billion won ($13.5 to $16.9 million), while the M-346 costs 18 to 20 billion won.

Link
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news...205_41302.html
March 17th, 2009  
A Can of Man
 
 
Nice.
Hope the deal goes through. The F/A-50, the combat variant might not be too far off either.
March 17th, 2009  
Balkan-MiG
 
 
I guess it will have similar performance to a G-4 Super Galeb, but it would be good for countries that need a cheap aircraft [Though their heads might direct towards China for that]
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March 17th, 2009  
A Can of Man
 
 
Dude, the Super Galeb is a plane from the friggin 1970's Yugoslav technology. It's not even supersonic. The T-50 manages around Mach 1.5 which isn't stellar but a heck of a lt better than Mach .86.
The avionics is obviously another thing. 2008 South Korean avionics vs 1978 Yugoslavian avionics. Which do you think would be better?
The Super Galeb was no doube a fine aircraft in its day but comparing it to a supersonic trainer that's undergoing serious evaluation by several countries is kind of ridiculous.
March 17th, 2009  
Bimcnorth
 
 
It´s a deal that when signed makes a lot of sense

The price is right given that Iraq are not minted like many other buyers in the area so going for a cheap but modern trainer/fighter gives you the opportunity to build from there while actually getting a kind of airforce able to at least look the part.
Korea is as always eager to make sure that they got sufficient oil flowing in their direction so any offset deals will be easy..
March 18th, 2009  
Balkan-MiG
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by the_13th_redneck
Dude, the Super Galeb is a plane from the friggin 1970's Yugoslav technology. It's not even supersonic. The T-50 manages around Mach 1.5 which isn't stellar but a heck of a lt better than Mach .86.
The avionics is obviously another thing. 2008 South Korean avionics vs 1978 Yugoslavian avionics. Which do you think would be better?
The Super Galeb was no doube a fine aircraft in its day but comparing it to a supersonic trainer that's undergoing serious evaluation by several countries is kind of ridiculous.

The G-4 has been recently modernised, and I beleive it can now go above Mach 1 [Im not sure if thats correct, it might have been another aircraft]. But I doubt that the T-50 would have too much market if they make a combat version of it.
March 18th, 2009  
A Can of Man
 
 
Whatever it is you're smoking, you really should stop.
March 18th, 2009  
Balkan-MiG
 
 
What? Its true. The G-4 has been modernised.
March 20th, 2009  
-- Dusty
 
 
Balkan, you can modernize a bi-plane, but that won't make it supersonic capable. I don't think the G4 was designed structurally, for anything past the speed of sound. I may be wrong, but I really doubt it.

That was a problem during WW2 when some prop jobs reached speeds they were not designed for. The P51 and Spitfire, IIRC. Something some people miss is the level of surface and intragal stress that a plane has in sub-sonic speeds versus passing the sound barrier.

The sound barrier is truly more than just sound, but a complexity of stresses. And I don't think the G4 is designed to handle those stresses.
March 20th, 2009  
A Can of Man
 
 
Hey they both kinda resemble each other and the other one was made in Yugoslavia. There's no way this Korean jet could outperform it! </sarcasm>
 


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