Inert Ordnance - Page 3




 
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October 17th, 2011  
eTe
 
 
How does one go about making something like that safe?

I mean, do they have very ballsy people who tinker with it or send a robot in with a little bomb to 'dismantle' it?
October 18th, 2011  
senojekips
 
 
It pretty much depends on a number of things like, identification, location, size, and condition. To go through all the considerations and possible methods would take more time than I have, but in practice it's all done relatively quickly and a plan of attack worked out.

Basically because all these old bombs are now heavily corroded and sometimes physically damaged, the most common way, if it can't be destroyed on site, is for it to be remotely trepanned and steamed out (sometimes solvents can be used), in situ if possible, sometimes they are burnt but the risk of detonation is still quite high if the fuses are intact. My info is 30+ years old but I'd say it's still applicable.
October 20th, 2011  
84RFK
 
 
Maybe it should be added that not all inert ordnance is actually inert..

Back at the end of basic training I happened to be among the lucky few who got to empty a stock of 40 mm. L/60 shells from the storage.
The entire lot of 384 shells, packed in 24 sealed containers of 16 rounds, was manhandeled out to a Bofors L/60 gun overlooking the sea, and we prepared the piece for the fire.

The grenades was all inert training rounds, painted blue as cold grenadea is/was supposed to be, and we merrily targeted a rock some 700 meters away.
As the grenades splashed closer to the rock, and we gained some hits, I noticed what appeared to be explotions on hit.
Checking the labels and packing papers it appeared that the rounds had been reworked in the US (Frankford Arsenal, Lake City Ordnance Plant, I can't remember) in 1943, the rounds contained a phosphorous tracer AND a self-destruction device consisting of (60 grams?) TNT....

In short: a live inert round.

We had plenty fun shoting it though.
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October 20th, 2011  
eTe
 
 
Haha 84RfK that would have been awesome
October 21st, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 84RFK
Maybe it should be added that not all inert ordnance is actually inert..

Back at the end of basic training I happened to be among the lucky few who got to empty a stock of 40 mm. L/60 shells from the storage.
The entire lot of 384 shells, packed in 24 sealed containers of 16 rounds, was manhandeled out to a Bofors L/60 gun overlooking the sea, and we prepared the piece for the fire.
.
Not too long ago a policeman on the Essex coast in UK, was approached by a young lad who wasn't all the ticket carrying a long round object, saying, "Officer I found this when the tide went out." The policeman looked down and although he didn't know much about anything munitions, saw to his horror that it was a projectile that hadn't exploded.

The policeman as calm as he could be and trying not to panic, told the lad to put it back where he found it, and then to come back. He then got on the radio.

A Royal Navy bomb disposal team arrived and checked the round, and said that it was from a 40mm Bofors and was indeed live, probably fired during the Blitz, the round was blown up then officer i/c remarked "That's sorted, time for tea and medals, well tea anyway."
 


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