human wave tactics




 
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Boots
 
January 19th, 2005  
Chinaman
 

Topic: human wave tactics


why are there so many people that assume that china uses human wave tactics, not just china though, also russia, and other countries

give me ur reasons why u think so
January 19th, 2005  
Marksman
 
 
I personally dont think so,but they may think its a human wave due to the large number of platoons executing some sort of tactics in small area.
January 19th, 2005  
AussieNick
 
Historical fact.... China, Russia, Japan and North Korea were known to use human wave tactics... and there is nothing to suggest given the same circumstances they wouldn't do the same.
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Boots
January 19th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
For Japan it was more of a last ditch thing. For the Soviets, Chinese and perhaps also the North Koreans in some cases it was the order of the day. Even by the time of Dien Bien Phu it was clear that the human wave tactic was useful for only those with so many troops that a general just had to get rid of them and General Giap largely abandoned it.
The reason why the link between China and human wave tactic keeps coming up here is because China is the more frequent topic than any of the others.
January 19th, 2005  
AussieNick
 
I wouldn't go as far as saying it was last ditch for the Japanese. Many many human wave attacks on the Australians at Kokoda, and this was the furthest point of conquest for the Japanese, so it wasn't a last ditch thing at all, it was the peak of their "pacific empire".
January 19th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AussieNick
I wouldn't go as far as saying it was last ditch for the Japanese. Many many human wave attacks on the Australians at Kokoda, and this was the furthest point of conquest for the Japanese, so it wasn't a last ditch thing at all, it was the peak of their "pacific empire".
Well I say it was last ditch because the Japanese turned to the Banzai attacks when it was clear that their forces weren't going to hold. Basically just before they felt they became combat ineffective (i.e. unable to continue their offensive or unable to even continue to hold their ground) they would charge. Before that they would use smart tactics like most armies.
So at Kokoda, even though it may have been Japan's peak strategically, tactically the forces there must have been put in a desperate position.
January 19th, 2005  
AussieNick
 
2,000 Japanese soldiers Vs 77 Australian Reserve soldiers armed with Lee Enfields and Bren guns holding a mountain village (first battle of Kokoda). I don't think that was what you'd call a desperate situation. In fact, they were in a prime situation, they faced a regiment (the 39th Infantry Militia) who had never been in combat before, and were reserve soldiers. The Japanese had fought through the entire pacific, and at this time the supply chain was strong and flowing. So yeah, no desperation in their actions at all. At the main point of the Kokoda campaign there were approx 10,000 Japanese troops in Kokoda, and approx 3,000 Australian soldiers facing them.
January 19th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
I think that was more of a case of...
Recon Captain: Sir, there's less than a hundred of them.
General: Really? Well I guess I'll just order a Banzai charge then.
RC: Can't we just call in the artillery and do things the normal way?
G: Do you expect me to stay up all night busting my balls planning some offensive against a bunch of janitors? *draws a line on the map* There, that straight line should do. In the name of the Emperor you shall lead the Banzai assault!

The General went to sleep confident his side would be victorious...

Either way seems rather odd. I don't know if the Japanese used wave tactics in China.
January 19th, 2005  
AussieNick
 
Quote:
I think that was more of a case of...
Recon Captain: Sir, there's less than a hundred of them.
General: Really? Well I guess I'll just order a Banzai charge then.
RC: Can't we just call in the artillery and do things the normal way?
G: Do you expect me to stay up all night busting my balls planning some offensive against a bunch of janitors? *draws a line on the map* There, that straight line should do. In the name of the Emperor you shall lead the Banzai assault!

The General went to sleep confident his side would be victorious...

Either way seems rather odd. I don't know if the Japanese used wave tactics in China.
I think you should do some more research into this topic before you speculate much further. Japanese had no artillery in Kokoda. The Australians were in the same situation and didn't use the same tactics. Plus the attacks were repelled most times.
The Kokoda campaign was something totally different to any other part of the pacific campaign, and there is much more to it than you'd think. And as I've said before, keep it in mind that the Australians defeated the Japanese outright after being pushed back to within 48km of Port Moresby.
January 19th, 2005  
A Can of Man
 
 
It's called "I'm joking."
Yeah I really don't know about that battle but I found it surprising that the Japanese would actually do a Banzai charge as the standard engagement tactic. I don't think it was though. Maybe they felt a need to leave an impression.