Hiroshima debate? - Page 7




 
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August 8th, 2005  
Corocotta
 
 
I see both of them abominable, but the bombings are worst from my point of view. The bombings were the most coward act of war ever.

An "evil weapon" for me are the ones that can kill hundreds of thousands in a single second,destroy the enviorement for thousand of years, create horrible disease to the affected people......I guess that for you an atomic weapons is just a "litle boy".

If you threw the bomb to the jananese due to their crimes in the POWs, why not throwing it to Berlin and Rome also? They were pretty bad guys too...

By the way, americans had their own POWs in Germany after WWII, and I heard that they did not had anything to do with the Hilton, actually hundred of thousands of germans died there. Ooops, I forgot that one of your allies, Mr.Stalin had a place called Gulag, but Mr. Roosvelt did not say a single word about such a nice place.
August 8th, 2005  
Missileer
 
 
This is a good website. It cites atrocities on all sides.

http://www.uwsa.com/issues/trade/samtrade/sam62-04.html

Daws: Americans taken prisoner on Wake island were beheaded. Virtually the first Australian prisoners the Japanese took in Malaya were tied in barbed wire and set on fire with gasoline. After McArthur's army in the Philippines was taken, the Bataan death march left a corpse every ten or fifteen yards for 100 miles. On the Burma-Siam railroad, the combination of slave labor, starvation, disease and beatings left a POW dead for each and every Japanese railroad regiment soldier ¾ 12,500 POW bodies along a 250 mile track. Overall in the Pacific War, about one in three American, Australian and British POWS died horribly ¾ a dreadful death rate, worse than the death rate for allied soldiers in combat against the Japanese.

Another good one.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/war/wwt..._pows_01.shtml

Ex-POW Heinz Hermann recalls that 'it was wonderful. After all those years of war and captivity, to be in a private home again. Welcomed by good people. It was a beautiful Christmas Day, which I'll never forget 'til the day I die.' Heinz's mother in Germany was surprised and touched to receive food parcels sent by English friends Heinz had made in Oswaldtwistle.

By the end of 1947, around 250,000 German POWs had been
repatriated, but 24,000 decided to stay in Britain. Hans Siegfried Vallentin was one of these. Like many of the others, he'd been a keen supporter of Hitler. He'd even lied about his age to get into the Luftwaffe. He was only 17 when he was shot down and taken prisoner. But now, three years later, he didn't want to go back home. He'd fallen in love with Irene, a local Oswaldtwistle girl. They still live in Oswaldtwistle and have five children, eleven grandchildren and two great grandchildren.
August 8th, 2005  
Corocotta
 
 
Missileer, I agree with all the info you posted. While German soldiers from the British and Canadian zones were quickly regaining strength and were helping rebuild Europe, Germans taken by the Americans were dying by the hundreds of thousands - emaciated figures in diarrhea smeared clothing, huddling pitifully in watery holes with perhaps a scrap of cardboard over their heads and a rotten potato for supper. At times many of them were reduced to drinking urine and eating grass.

April 17, 1945: The Americans opened their enormous Rheinberg Camp, six miles in circumference, with no food or shelter whatsoever. As in the other big "Rhine meadow" camps, opened in mid-April, there was initially no latrines and no water. In some camps, the men were so crowded they could not lie down. Meanwhile, at Camp Kripp, near Remagen, the half-American Charles von Luttichau determines that his German comrades are receiving about 5% as much food as their captors." Complaining to the camp commander, HE SAID: ''Forget the Geneva Convention. You don't have any rights."


http://www.the7thfire.com/Politics%2...d_war_II_2.htm

I guess that no one in a war has their hands clean of blood.
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August 8th, 2005  
LeEnfield
 
 
Corocotta.......For some one who can't remember the war and what went on then you can happily take the morale high ground and pour scorn on those that fought. Now it is very easy when you run out of arguments to prove your point to sit there and just two wrongs don't make a right. I saw these men and worked beside them and they never forgot what they went through, or do you think that we shouldn't have dropped the bomb and just let the Japanese kill them all off as they planned too. How is they Japanese can kill more Allied POW than all the people that were killed by the Atomic blasts, yet they are the poor souls that suffered. These Bombs brought the war to a quick end and saved millions of life's.
August 8th, 2005  
Boobies
 
 

Topic: Hmmmm?


Why are we discussing POW camps in the US when atomic bombs are the subject.

One thing tho, I would never want to see hundreds of thousand of American, Aussies, British soldiers die in that invasion of Japan. And I surely don't want to see Japanese population being reduced to near zero because of the brutality of a lasting war.
August 8th, 2005  
Corocotta
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
Corocotta.......For some one who can't remember the war and what went on then you can happily take the morale high ground and pour scorn on those that fought. Now it is very easy when you run out of arguments to prove your point to sit there and just two wrongs don't make a right. I saw these men and worked beside them and they never forgot what they went through, or do you think that we shouldn't have dropped the bomb and just let the Japanese kill them all off as they planned too. How is they Japanese can kill more Allied POW than all the people that were killed by the Atomic blasts, yet they are the poor souls that suffered. These Bombs brought the war to a quick end and saved millions of life's.
I understand your point of view LeEnfield, but from my point of view innocent civilians shouldn“t pay for the crimes of their army. Watching the pics that these days are coming up in the newspappers and TV of incinareted childs and women make my sick, it is unjustificable sorry!! By the way, japanese were very close to surrender before the nuclears blast, but i guess that the US wanted to test their brand new toy in order to scare hyphotetic new enemies such us the....USSR?

Bobbies, I am talking about german POWs after WWII because many people here justify the nuclear blasts due to the existance of british and american POW in the pacific. I see this attitude kind of hypocrit when they were doing the same with german POWs
August 8th, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corocotta

By the way, japanese were very close to surrender before the nuclears blast, but i guess that the US wanted to test their brand new toy in order to scare hyphotetic new enemies such us the....USSR?

No they weren't. The Japanese Foreign Minister made some attempts to broker a peace agreement through the Soviets but they were not real or sincere.They were a stop gap.

While Civilian Ministers might have endorsed a peace agreement the IJA was going to fight on. They even attempted a coup on the Emporer after the A bombs to for stall the surrender.

Hiroshima and Nagasaki had Military Value and Industrial Value. The Japanese referred to them as Army Cities.

The fact is this. Whether or not you agree with it from your oh so high and shiney ivory tower on the moral high ground. The estimated US casualties in an invasion of the home islands was One Million. This does not take into account the POW's US, British, Aussie, Kiwi, Canadian and Dutch who would have been executed. It does not take into account the Aussie, Kiwi and British servicemen who would have taken part in the invasion and offensive. The bombings saved more than they killed.
August 8th, 2005  
Corocotta
 
 
Quote:
Hiroshima and Nagasaki had Military Value and Industrial Value. The Japanese referred to them as Army Cities
And why were they the less bombed city of Japan if they had such an important militar value?
August 8th, 2005  
03USMC
 
 
Because targets are prioritized. Tokyo , Sasebo, Kobe, Iwakuni were all higher value targets.
August 8th, 2005  
Corocotta
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 03USMC
Because targets are prioritized. Tokyo , Sasebo, Kobe, Iwakuni were all higher value targets.
Well, then I guess that it wasn“t that important. From my point of view the blast were made to scare the japanese, not to destroy a couple industries or a few thousand soldiers, if these would have been the porpouse of the nuclear blast conventional explosives would have been more that enough. And again, killing hundreds and hundreds of thousand people just to impress the enemy is not very ethical to me, but I guess that your military logic is hard to understand for me.