Hiroshima debate? - Page 15




 
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August 16th, 2005  
Rich
 
Isn't this a revisionist thing?

The debate about apologizing to the Aborigines in Australia has been going on for a long time. Despite the PM's refusal to apologize, schools in Oz no longer teach a history that glosses over or ignores the worst parts of our history (Terra Nullus, genocide, Stolen generation, etc)

Personally, I am not convinced (yet) by the value of political apologies - I think the real value comes from acknowledging that your history exists and educating your people about what really happened. From that, you are more likely to build a collective will to not allow these kinds of atrocities from occurring again and take action to make some restitution to the people effected. (provided of course the will of the govt is behind it)

If the Japanese govt apologizes but refuses to accurately reflect its own history, then I think the apology may have well been made in the woods with no one else around. But if this is the first step to addressing the inaccuracies in their own past, and learning from it - then maybe, just maybe, this is a step in the right direction.

Now, here's a question - has German philosophy and culture advanced because of their acknowledgement of their modern history (both good and bad)? If so, has Japanese culture been stunted as a result of its own refusal to do so? - this might deserve to be topic on its own(?)
August 17th, 2005  
LeEnfield
 
 
It amuses me that NO one is asking the Italians to apologise for what there armies did all over Europe. They enslaved many a nation and even fed them to lions.
August 17th, 2005  
Corocotta
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
It amuses me that NO one is asking the Italians to apologise for what there armies did all over Europe. They enslaved many a nation and even fed them to lions.


hehehehehehhe, yes they deserve a couple nukes. Just kidding.
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August 17th, 2005  
Rich
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
It amuses me that NO one is asking the Italians to apologise for what there armies did all over Europe. They enslaved many a nation and even fed them to lions.
lol - but wasn't that just for entertainment!
August 19th, 2005  
godofthunder9010
 
 
It's mind boggling how many diplomatic headaches Japan could alleviate by just fessing up to their warcrimes and pointedly teaching their children that "we did some terrible things", etc.
August 21st, 2005  
Ashes
 
Could I ask a question? If the Japanese didn't surrender by the invasion date, what would make it imperative to invade?

I've seen several reasons, and none seem very convincing.
August 21st, 2005  
LeEnfield
 
 
What do you think you are going to do, just sit there and wait for them to build even more fortifications, if there forces do not surrender then they have more time to attack you again. Just sitting there waiting for them to make up their minds is not an option.
August 21st, 2005  
Missileer
 
 
There were battles going on as the bombs dropped and after and would have gone on for years. Japanese submarines were active until told to surrender by the Emperor. Japan was, as far as the military was concerned, still at war and would not have surrendered nor would the fighting have ended.
August 21st, 2005  
FULLMETALJACKET
 
 
MY grandfather sat and watched as they loaded the bomb to drop on hiroshima.
August 23rd, 2005  
Ashes
 
LeEnfield said..............

"just sit there and wait for them to build even more fortifications"


I dont think Maj. Gen. Curtis LeMay or the men of the Twentieth Air Force would say they were just sitting there and doing nothing.

They were very busy devastating Japan.

Monthly tonnage dropped on Japan had increased from 13,800 tons in March to 42,700 tons in July, and was planned to have continued to increase to around 115,000 tons per month.

Within 10 days, of the fire bombing, LeMay wiped out 32 square miles of Japanese cities, dozens of industrial targets and hundreds of feeder plants.

Admiral Nimitz ordered Lemay to drop thousands of mines which virtually shut down all shipping. The mine laying left the Japanese in chaos, as the results were so effective Japan was actually starving.

Fuel was critically low.

The country was on the verge of collapse.

Total casualties on the American side, in the whole of the bombing raids, 576 fliers killed and 2400 missing in action.

The United States Strategic Bombing Survey, after interviewing hundreds of Japanese civilian and military leaders after Japan surrendered, reported:

"Based on a detailed investigation of all the facts, and supported by the testimony of the surviving Japanese leaders involved, it is the Survey's opinion that certainly prior to 31 December 1945, and in all probability prior to 1 November 1945, Japan would have surrendered even if the atomic bombs had not been dropped, even if Russia had not entered the war, and even if no invasion had been planned or contemplated."