Gun license




 
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Boots
 
October 23rd, 2011  
eTe
 
 

Topic: Gun license


Just put my application for an A & B cat license today.
Basically means I will be able to possess and use non self-reloading rimfire and centre fire rifles for sport and hunting.
Went to a rifle club as well on Saturday. Only 40 mins from home. Was great.

I envy you Americans in this regard, it will probably be 2-3 months before I get my ticket (or so I am told haha).
Hoping to get a .223 centrefire for 200yd shoots, and .22 rimfire for 100yd.
Also, apparently there is heaps of deer roaming the country side these days. Will be interesting to kill, clean and eat my own produce like they did in olden times.
October 23rd, 2011  
senojekips
 
 
I would seriously recommend you get something a little larger than .223 for hunting deer.
October 23rd, 2011  
George
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by senojekips
I would seriously recommend you get something a little larger than .223 for hunting deer.
.303 or 7.62 NATO/.308 would be better
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Boots
October 23rd, 2011  
Yossarian
 
 
I have seen people kill deer with .223 youth models before, but it's not really the easiest way if you want to hunt with a rifle.

Popular rounds for where I live around are 270 or 30.06, I would defienatly investigate as for plentiful ammuntion in your area, aslo investigate cost, I know people who use a 300 Mag, problem is those cartriges get expensive while sighting in during the off season.

If cost is your main focus, then .223 fits the bill. Unless you place a round directly in the "sweet spot" you better be ready to track the animal down, almost always after shooting a deer with a .223 or similar round you generally have a blood trial to go track down, and best of luck if the trail leads to someone elses property

Unless you shoot them in the head....and no one really does that for obvious reasons.
October 23rd, 2011  
eTe
 
 
Heh thanks for the tip.
Will look into it. Might not happen right away due to I get paid less than minimum wage I think haha.
October 24th, 2011  
84RFK
 
 
Spending much of my time (also working hours) hunting, I might add some few words of advise here.
Unless the deer in NZ is abnormal in size, rounds like .270 and .30-06 would be overkill, and frustrating for your bank account (and shoulder) in the long run.
Same applies to all the magnum loads, while the .223 would be a bit underpowered.
Sure enough, the little .223 packs enough punch to bag a deer with a good hit, but a less than perfect shot will result in a long and frustrating search for a wounded animal.
And I assure you, the meat from a deer who has spendt half a day running around with a gunshot wound isn't quite as delicate in taste and appearance as the deer you topple over with an adequate round.

My suggestion, as I know less than nothing about prize and availability of ammo in the NZ, is that you check wich calibre is the cheapest available in your neighbourhood, and then go for either the .308 or the .303.
The .308 could also be available as susplus 7,62 NATO for target practice, and you can buy a box of .308 allmost wherever you are in the world.

If I were you, with limited funds and living on NZ, I'd go for the .308.
It's comfortable to shoot (important when you spend time on the shooting range) have a good accuracy, and doesn't cost the white of your eyes to shoot.
Plus, it will take a deer neatly enough to supply your dinners for all foreseeable future.

After all, we take plenty moose with the .308 up here.
October 24th, 2011  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 84RFK
After all, we take plenty moose with the .308 up here.
The .308 is one of the most underrated calibres on the market, its more then enough for buck such as Springbok which seems to be one of the the most hunted in this part of the world with the bonus, recoil is not excessive. Its a very good round and inherently accurate.

Another good round but again underrated is the British 303. The calibre has hunted more game in Africa then any other calibre. It earned a bad reputation among South African farmers because standard 303 Mk7 ammunition was being used, resulting in a lot of wounded game dying in agony. Used with the correct 180 grain ammunition, it will take the same game as the .308

WDM Bell even brain shot elephant with the round. He shot 200 odd elephant with the .303 and the 215 grain army bullet. Although, it took more courage then I've got.

One of the wildcats made in South Africa was necking down a .303 British case to 6mm, low recoil and good for Springbok. A 100 grain bullet left the muzzle at somewhere around 2400-2500 FPS. The cartridge is known as the 6mm Musgrave.

Another recent wildcat made here is a 5.56/223 necked up to 6mm. I've never seen one, but I hear there are rave reviews. Cheap to reload for and does the job.

Some people do hunt with 222 (sometimes called the cripple 2) and the 223/5.56, personally I'd avoid both like the plague.

One round I detest is the factory .243, its far too fast and has the habit of destroying meat. I've seen springbok carcasses hung up after skinning and nothing but a blooded mess, good for dog meat only. The only way I have found to tame the calibre is to load monolithic bullets to a more moderate velocity.

A good but expensive "all rounder" (if there is such a thing) is the Holland and Holland 375, it can take most game from Springbok without damaging the meat to elephant. For elephant the 375 H&H is marginal, personally I'd rather a 416 Rigsby.

Someone came into my shop and said he wanted a 22 rimfire to hunt Springbok, I said, "If you hunt springbok with a 22 rimfire I'll hunt you down." He was requested to vacate my shop in a sexual manner.
October 24th, 2011  
eTe
 
 
84RFK I live in South Australia. Close though.
And yeah I'm glad there's no elephant then.
As I'm quite new to this game, there's obviously a lot I don't know. For example, I never considered smaller rounds for hunting larger animals a bad thing. When I was much younger, we shot kangaroos off the back of a ute with a self loading .22. Never chased the next until the wounded roo was confirmed dead. But still, I was told that was unethical. I found it odd but there you go.

And that's interesting BA. On some Aussie hunting forums, I think someone mentioned about a .303 British, and having difficulty acquiring the ammo for reloading. I don't quite recall.
However the largest I think I'd go for would be goats and deer. I'll look into the .308 instead of a 30-06, but that rifle is still a long way down the track.
Still a lot of stuff I have to pay off until then on apprentice wages.
October 24th, 2011  
84RFK
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eTe
84RFK I live in South Australia. Close though.
And yeah I'm glad there's no elephant then.
As I'm quite new to this game, there's obviously a lot I don't know. For example, I never considered smaller rounds for hunting larger animals a bad thing. When I was much younger, we shot kangaroos off the back of a ute with a self loading .22. Never chased the next until the wounded roo was confirmed dead. But still, I was told that was unethical. I found it odd but there you go.

And that's interesting BA. On some Aussie hunting forums, I think someone mentioned about a .303 British, and having difficulty acquiring the ammo for reloading. I don't quite recall.
However the largest I think I'd go for would be goats and deer. I'll look into the .308 instead of a 30-06, but that rifle is still a long way down the track.
Still a lot of stuff I have to pay off until then on apprentice wages.
Whoops!
Sorry, counted the number of stars and still got it wrong here...
Normally I wouldn't dream about taking an Aussie for a Kiwi, nor the other way around, as both tend to take it less favourable..

Anyway, if required (life depending on it etc.) you can take on surprisingly big animals with a .223 and secure the meat, but it's still a less than ideal calibre for hunting game the size larger than fox and roedeer.
And besides, most of the bullets you find in commercial loads for the .223 is not suited for hunting anything you intend to eat, they have a tendency to break up into fragments...

The reason I recommended the .308 is that it's versatile, have a comfortable recoil, can be found for a reasonable price (both the rifle and the ammo) plus a wide range of factory loads to choose from.
October 25th, 2011  
MontyB
 
 
I tend to agree, I use an refurbished ex-army L1A1 SLR for deer locally, ammunition is plentiful and fairly cheap but it will be replaced by an L115A3 once it arrives in the country which will be good for a bit of night pig shooting as well.

Oh and our stars are red not white.
 


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