The Greatest Soldier to ever exist, EVER. - Page 7




 
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Boots
 
June 7th, 2005  
bush musketeer
 
 

Topic: hmm to many to mention i think


capt Alexander thomas paterson 39th battalion
was awarded the MC (military cross) for the following.


On the 7th june 1917 at MESSINES for skillful leadership and gallant conduct. During the approach march his battalion was partially disorganised owing to the effect of gas shells and he himself was also slightly gassed. on reaching the assembly position he reorganised his battalion and subsequently led his command with great dash and skill and was chiefly instrumental in the gaining of objectives alloted to his unit.
He personally silenced an enemy machine gun and was largely responsible for the capture of two other hostile machine guns and thier crews. after the capture of his objectives he supervised the consolidation of the line until he fell wounded. his courageous conduct and splendid example had an excellent and most benificial effect on his men.


there are so many examples such as this that its a bit pointless to try an answer the question.
July 29th, 2005  
LeEnfield
 
 
When I was in the Army so were a large number of WW2 Vets. One of the chaps who I remember well was awarded the MM at Arnhem, This is how earned it His best mate was blown to bits beside him by some German Panzers, had grabbed a sten gun and charged the first tank on reaching it under a hail of bullets from the German infantry he climbed up on the tank and poked the barrel of the sub machine gun through an observation slit and emptied the magazine killing all those in side. He then repeated this act twice more knocking out all the tanks causing the lads problems and then he ran back to his own lines with out scratch through a hail of machine gun and rifle fire. Now every one there thought that this act was worthy of a higher award along the lines of a VC, but this was refused as this act of bravery had not been witnessed by an officer
July 29th, 2005  
Missileer
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
When I was in the Army so were a large number of WW2 Vets. One of the chaps who I remember well was awarded the MM at Arnhem, This is how earned it His best mate was blown to bits beside him by some German Panzers, had grabbed a sten gun and charged the first tank on reaching it under a hail of bullets from the German infantry he climbed up on the tank and poked the barrel of the sub machine gun through an observation slit and emptied the magazine killing all those in side. He then repeated this act twice more knocking out all the tanks causing the lads problems and then he ran back to his own lines with out scratch through a hail of machine gun and rifle fire. Now every one there thought that this act was worthy of a higher award along the lines of a VC, but this was refused as this act of bravery had not been witnessed by an officer
That's when uncommon valor was common. I think he should have been awarded the Victoria Cross.
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Boots
August 14th, 2005  
Kina
 
alexander the great
August 14th, 2005  
tomtom22
 
 
Pvt. Beetle Baily
August 14th, 2005  
Missileer
 
 
Kilroy, he was everywhere at once.
August 15th, 2005  
Claymore
 
 
Any Scot in any war. (But most likely he was a MacKinnon )

nuff said...
August 15th, 2005  
behemoth79
 
 
id go with alvin york (isnt it spelled yorke?)
August 15th, 2005  
Bory
 
 
Philip II of Macedon

Why, well despite Oliver Stone's attempted history lesson, Philip II Invented his Son's tactics, and re-trained, and re-organised his army, he alone changed the image of the army by training professionals all year round, not just during a conflict and giving them lighter equipment than the Greeks, Emphasised the use of Cavalry on a battlefield, emphasised the Auxiliaries effectiveness on a staionary Greek Phalanx.

Essentially, the very basic ideas of a modern army, he invented. Then he
United and liberated all of Macedon, he united/conqured all the Greek States but Sparta, coz the Sparatans weren't dumb enough to take him on at Chaeronea and he drew up the invasion plan for Persia.
He just didn't live long enough to carry them out.
August 16th, 2005  
Sooners1
 
 
Nobody has mentioned Smedley Butler yet?

2 Medals Of Honor

His first Medal of Honor was presented following action at Vera Cruz, Mexico, 21-22 April 1914, where he commanded the Marines who landed and occupied the city. Maj Butler "was eminent and conspicuous in command of his Battalion. He exhibited courage and skill in leading his men through the action of the 22nd and in the final occupation of the city."

The following year, he was awarded the second Medal of Honor for bravery and forceful leadership as Commanding Officer of detachments of Marines and seamen of the USS Connecticut in repulsing Caco resistance on Fort Riviere, Haiti, 17 November 1915.

During World War I, he commanded the 13th Regiment in France. For exceptionally meritorious service, he was awarded the Army Distinguished Service Medal, the Navy Distinguished Service Medal, and the French Order of the Black Star. When he returned to the United States in 1919, he became Commanding General of the Marine Barracks, Quantico, Virginia, and served in this capacity until January 1924, when he was granted leave of absence to accept the post of Director of Public Safety of the City of Philadelphia. In February 1926, he assumed command of the Marine Corps Base at San Diego, California. In March 1927, he returned to China for duty with the 3d Marine Brigade. From April to 31 October he again commanded the Marine Barracks at Quantico. On 1 October 1931, he was retired upon his own application after completion of 33 years' service in the Marine Corps.