The Greatest Soldier to ever exist, EVER. - Page 16




 
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Boots
 
December 12th, 2010  
SGT Long
 
 
For me, toss up between Otto Skorzany and COL Robert Howard.
December 12th, 2010  
justin1552
 
 
I'd have to say Audie Murphy or Simo Häyhä.
August 18th, 2011  
Liberus
 
I'll mention the others that have yet to be considered.

Saladin- I'm sure most people know his military prowess. Great man.

Lu Bu- Considered the strongest warrior of China.

Spartacus- Leader of slaves, gladiator, over all a great soldier.

Admiral Yi- Yi was victorious in every single operation (at least 15 battles) of the four campaigns of 1592. His campaigns resulted in hundreds of sunken Japanese warships, transports, supply ships and thousands of Japanese naval casualties.

Note: he was heavily outnumbered in every battle.

-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yi_Sun-sin

Gyebaek- In 660, Baekjae was invaded by a force of 50,000 from Silla, supported by 144,000 Tang soldiers. Gye Baek, with only 5,000 troops under his command, met them in the battlefield of Hwangsanbeol. Before entering departing to the battlefield, Gyebaek reportedly killed his wife and children to boost the fallen morale and patriotism of his army, and to prevent the thought of them to influence his actions or to cause him to falter in battle.

A soldier who gave up everything for his country against all odds.

-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyebaek
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Boots
August 18th, 2011  
LeEnfield
 
 
Lets face it they are all great soldiers and often go away a die bravely unseen and unsung in some far off foreign land, remembered only by there loved ones. Never mind the Generals and all his hangers on but when it comes down to it, it is the man that stands and holds the line even unto death. The general take the credit and the soldier often lye's forgotten
August 18th, 2011  
KV.
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
Lets face it they are all great soldiers and often go away a die bravely unseen and unsung in some far off foreign land, remembered only by there loved ones. Never mind the Generals and all his hangers on but when it comes down to it, it is the man that stands and holds the line even unto death. The general take the credit and the soldier often lye's forgotten

Well said.

KV.
August 18th, 2011  
sven hassell
 
 
Lachhiman Gurung VC (30 December 1917 – 12 December 2010[2]) was a Nepalese recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.
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[hide][edit] Details

Gurung was born in the village of Dakhani, in the Tanahu District of Nepal, the son of Partiman Gurung.[3] He joined the British Indian Army in December 1940, permitted to enlist in wartime although only 4'11" tall and so below the peacetime minimum height. He was 27 years old, and a Rifleman in the 4th Battalion, 8th Gurkha Rifles, in the Indian Army during World War II when the following deed took place in May 1945 for which he was awarded the VC.
His Battalion was part of the 89th Indian Infantry Brigade of 7th Indian Infantry Division, which was ordered to cross the Irrawaddy River and attack Japanese forces to the north of the road from Prome to Taungup. The Japanese withdrew towards Taungdaw, where Gurung was part of the two companies of the 4th Battalion, 8th Gurkha Rifles waiting, when the Japanese attacked in force in the early morning.[3]
On 12/13 May 1945 at Taungdaw, Burma [now Myanmar], Rifleman Lachhiman Gurung was manning the most forward post of his platoon which bore the brunt of an attack by at least 200 of the Japanese enemy. Twice he hurled back grenades which had fallen on his trench, but the third exploded in his right hand, blowing off his fingers, shattering his arm and severely wounding him in the face, body and right leg. His two comrades were also badly wounded but the rifleman, now alone and disregarding his wounds, loaded and fired his rifle with his left hand for four hours, calmly waiting for each attack which he met with fire at point blank range. Afterwards, when the casualties were counted, it is reported that there were 31 dead Japanese around his position which he had killed, with only one arm.[1]
August 18th, 2011  
42RM
 

Topic: The things that make a soldier great


The things that make a soldier great and send him out to die,
To face the flaming cannon's mouth nor ever question why,
Are lilacs by a little porch, the row of tulips red,
The peonies and pansies, too, the old petunia bed,
The grass plot where his children play, the roses on the wall:
'Tis these that make a soldier great.
He's fighting for them all.

'Tis not the pomp and pride of kings that make a soldier brave;
'Tis not allegiance to the flag that over him may wave;
For soldiers never fight so well on land or on the foam
As when behind the cause they see the little place called home.
Endanger but that humble street whereon his children run,
You make a soldier of the man who never bore a gun.
What is it through the battle smoke the valiant soldier sees?

The little garden far away, the budding apple trees,
The little patch of ground back there, the children at their play,
Perhaps a tiny mound behind the simple church of gray.
The golden thread of courage isn't linked to castle dome
But to the spot, where'er it be — the humblest spot called home.
And now the lilacs bud again and all is lovely there
And homesick soldiers far away know spring is in the air;
The tulips come to bloom again, the grass once more is green,
And every man can see the spot where all his joys have been.

He sees his children smile at him, he hears the bugle call,
And only death can stop him now — he's fighting for them all.

By Edgar Guest
August 19th, 2011  
muscogeemike
 
I’m going to nominate someone few have ever heard of - Jan Ziska, early 15th century Hussite General. He is credited with putting canons on wagons and using the wagons as mobile fortresses. Even after being blinded he still led his forces against invaders.

I also want to put a woman up for consideration. In the 3rd Century AD, when her husband, Odaenathos, was assassinated, Zenobia of the Syrian City State of Palmyra, literally took up his sword and successfully led her forces against the rebels and later against the Romans.

The Romans respected her so much that when they finally defeated her, the Roman General married her and took her to Rome where she lived out her days in luxury.
October 8th, 2011  
lenton
 

Topic: Leonidas of Thermopylae


.. and his 300 Spartans
October 8th, 2011  
muscogeemike
 
Far too many to select one, and there are countless who are un-named and un-remembered.
I would list three:
Hannibal Barca (Hannibal the Great, scourge of Rome) - great soldier, General and Admiral.
Jan Ziska - 14th century Christian Soldier and later commander of the Hussite’s against the Catholic Hierarchy. Created Mobil “forts”; mounting cannons on wagons and using them in mass, much like Armor today. Even after being blinded in battle commanded his forces for several years.
Benedict Arnold - yes he was an American traitor, but prior to his treachery he was maybe the most able American field commander, and he commanded the first successful American Fleet action.

You may love the Army but the Army will never love you – impossible to say this enough