The Greatest Ships - Page 6




 
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June 16th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
Uh yeah, I'm quite aware that submarines are boats and not ships. However, this site has many members who may not know that which was part of my reason for wishing them to not be included in this discussion. The other part being how they are used.
July 21st, 2005  
Pvt.Joker
 
AKAGI

The Akagi was a Japanese aircraft carrier that took part in the Battle of Pearl Harbor. It was destroyed on 5 June 1942 by planes of the US Navy during the Battle of Midway.

Akagi, a 34,364-ton aircraft carrier, was built at Kure, Japan. Begun as a battle cruiser, she was completed as one of Japan's first two large aircraft carriers in March 1927. Massively reconstructed in 1935-1938 to include an unusual port-side island and a full length flight deck, she was active off China during the next few years, and was flagship for the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941.

She also led other carriers on raids through the East Indies and the Indian Ocean, sinking the British carrier Hermes, driving the Allies out of Java and Sumatra and even getting to Darwin in Northern Australia.

She subsequently took part in carrier raids into the Indian Ocean area and was flagship of the carrier striking force during the Battle of Midway. On 4 June 1942, while operating northward of Midway, Akagi was hit by dive bombers from USS Enterprise and set afire. Damage control efforts were unsuccessful, and she was scuttled by Japanese destroyer torpedoes early the following day.

July 21st, 2005  
LeEnfield
 
 
I think that HMS Victory should be up there amongst all these famous ships, she can still be seen in Portsmouth Dockyard and is still listed as an operational ship some 245 years after her keel was laid. The ship is still used for Court Martials and Banquets and is kept in perfect condition. This ship has seen more battles and history than anything else afloat.
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September 12th, 2005  
mmarsh
 
 
USS Monitor/CSA Virginia. The first ironclads used in combat.
September 12th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
To be precise, the first ironclads to fight each other.

The first ironclads used in combat were in the Crimean War though they were used essentially as floating batteries firing against land fortifications.

Good choices, certainly. USS Monitor is in my list if you read my initial post that started this thread - though for a different reason. Your reason is, of course, equally auspicious.
September 13th, 2005  
LeEnfield
 
 
[img][/img]http://<br /> <br /> <br /> HMS W...<br /> <br />
September 13th, 2005  
Charge 7
 
 
I remember HMS Warrior, LeEnfield. Thanks for all the great detailed information on her. Unfortunately, your image isn't showing up. I hope you can fix that.
September 14th, 2005  
KC72
 
 


HMS Warrior
September 14th, 2005  
redcoat
 
 
HMS Warrior is not an 'Ironclad', that is a wooden ship clad in iron. She is in fact, the first iron hulled warship.

HMS Warrior is seen by many as being the greatest single advance in warship design in the history of naval warfare.

With her launching the age of the wooden warship came to an end.
September 15th, 2005  
godofthunder9010
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by redcoat
HMS Warrior is not an 'Ironclad', that is a wooden ship clad in iron. She is in fact, the first iron hulled warship.

HMS Warrior is seen by many as being the greatest single advance in warship design in the history of naval warfare.

With her launching the age of the wooden warship came to an end.
Some would disagree with the HMS Warrior as "the greatest single advance ..." in favor of the HMS Dreadnaught, but isn't it interesting that they're both Brittish? BTW, if my memory serves the CSS Virginia was the same sort as the HMS Warrior: A wooden battleship hulled with iron. So was the USS Monitor the first all steel/iron battleship or does that honor belong to another ship out there somewhere?