THE GREAT WAR - Page 2




 
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October 26th, 2004  
Young Winston
 
 
This is out of The Illustrated History of the World Wars (Cathay Books)

"In point of fact, the brunt of the fighting from July to November 1918 was borne by the tired but dogged British, who took 188,700 prisoners as against 196,000 taken by the French, Belgians, and Americans together."
October 26th, 2004  
godofthunder9010
 
 
It would be very foolish to under-rate the British role in WW1. For that matter, any of the main powers involved. There was a great deal more to that war than most people bother to learn.
November 8th, 2004  
Young Winston
 
 
I have just finished reading an interesting article about the Australian War graves and memorials in France from the Melbourne Age called "Tour of Duty".

Ross McMullin talks about the Western Battlefields (which he recently visited) where Australians fought: Fromelles, Peronne, Villers-Bretonneux, Ypres, and Bullecourt to name a few. Many Americans would never have heard of these places.

Ross discusses how many more Australians are now visiting the old battlefields and are learning the significance contribution the Australians made in the eventual defeat of German Army.

Some of the sights are being maintained by the local French. A French couple are looking after the Bullecourt memorial with no ongoing financial assistance from the Australian Government.

My family visited the Villers-Bretonneux memorial (very extensive and well maintained) in November 2001. It was a very moving experience. My wife, Liz has never had any interest in military history but she immediately burst into tears when we arrived. My girls and I went very quiet. It was a beautiful sunny day but the atmosphere of the place really hit us. Reading the inscriptions on the grave stones was extremely emotional. All those young men, (some just boys!!) lying row upon row in the French soil so far from their homeland.

Have any of our American forum contributors visited the major World War One AEF memorials and grave sites in France. We met a lot of Americans in Normandy visiting the major WW2 sites but were wondering whether the Great War sites were given much consideration. 114,000 US soldiers did die in WW1.

Approximately 60,000 Australians died in WW1.

From the article Ross quotes this inscription on the headstone of a 23-year-old 14th Brigade private killed at Fromelles:

"Will some kind mother as you pass on/Kneel and pray for my poor son".
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November 8th, 2004  
lundin
 
 
america entered the war at the right time. it was like adding a really good running back to a game in the fourth quarter. as far as tactics, there werent a whole lot, mainly people thinking up new weapons trying to break the stalemate of the trenches. Germany and Britian werent going anywhere, America just broke the stalemate.
November 8th, 2004  
AussieNick
 
I think you'll find you can't take the words of one book/historian. I believe it was Napoleon who said "history is just fables that are agreed on" (or something along these lines). It must be balanced against all other evidence and views, and if nothing is provided except a pro-US view point, then it can't be seen as a very "good" history book for a balanced view.

An interesting thing is the way the French revere the Australians still in a lot of the small French towns they fought in, with road names like ANZAC Rd. and Melbourne Ave..... They still hold the Aussies in great respect as the ones who freed them.
November 8th, 2004  
Young Winston
 
 
Sorry, please read the post below. Not sure how to delete them. Somebody got an idea how to do it?
November 8th, 2004  
Young Winston
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AussieNick


An interesting thing is the way the French revere the Australians still in a lot of the small French towns they fought in, with road names like ANZAC Rd. and Melbourne Ave..... They still hold the Aussies in great respect as the ones who freed them.
Nick,

When we were at Villers-Bretonneux it was a strange feeling to see road signs just outside the town saying something like "Welcome to Villers-Bretonneux, sister town to Robinvale, Australia" with a picture of a kangaroo with a huge bushy tale!!.

I found the French very good and helpful to us.
November 11th, 2004  
AussieNick
 
Kangaroos with bushy tales, hmmmm. What did the Diggers tell the French while they were there. I think they may have been pulling their legs. I didn't go to Villers-Bretonneux whilst in France, I was only there briefly and stayed Normandy with my great uncle for a week. It was amazing to stand on the beaches and look up at those cliffs. But I'm getting

Back to WW1.
November 13th, 2004  
Young Winston
 
 
This will interest Aussies mainly but at least two essential reads about Australian soldiers in the Great War are:

The Broken Years by Bill Gamage.

To the Last Ridge by W.H. Downing.