Germany lost the war in 1940 - Page 2




 
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February 21st, 2012  
42RM
 
@Troop
Thanks for the tip about the book.
In February 1943 a radio show started to broadcast in German called Deutsche Kurzwellensender Atlantik. This translated into English was 'German Short-Wave Radio Atlantic'. The band of the Royal Marines recorded real German military music to help the show sound really German.
February 21st, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
It did not help that Hitler surrounded himself with "Yes men".
He would not tolerate contradiction or anyone who was not of the same view as him.
This resulted in him sacking a number of skilled Generals because they would not agree with his ideas, and pointed out the errors of his strategy and tactics.
His inability to delegate and to demand control of all military assets, such as the armoured divisions in Northern France, were unhelpful.
He did indeed have an intrest and knowledge of weapons but his belief in "Bigger means better" resulted in vital resources and time being diverted to develop weapons that made little if any difference in the outcome of the war.
February 21st, 2012  
VDKMS
 
I also believed that the German defeat was because they fought on to many fronts. But when I follow der alte's logic this fighting on many fronts may be a direct result of the invincibility feel of the Germans.

In my opinion the Battle of Britain was also a turning point in the war in so far that it changed the way it was fought. After a German crew bombed a civilian target by mistake Churchill immediately ordered a revenge attack which in turn make Hitler decide to bomb London instead of the RAF airfields, and the "massacre" bombing raids got started on both sides. The RAF was the clear winner of this descision because now their planes were only destroyed in the air, a place where they were superiour to the Germans.

@Trooper1854
in the 90's I went to visit the "I was 20 in 45" exhibition in Brussels. It showed some stuff the resistance and intelligence people used. Quite remarkable things for that time.
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February 21st, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
I also believed that the German defeat was because they fought on to many fronts. But when I follow der alte's logic this fighting on many fronts may be a direct result of the invincibility feel of the Germans.

In my opinion the Battle of Britain was also a turning point in the war in so far that it changed the way it was fought. After a German crew bombed a civilian target by mistake Churchill immediately ordered a revenge attack which in turn make Hitler decide to bomb London instead of the RAF airfields, and the "massacre" bombing raids got started on both sides. The RAF was the clear winner of this descision because now their planes were only destroyed in the air, a place where they were superiour to the Germans.

@Trooper1854
in the 90's I went to visit the "I was 20 in 45" exhibition in Brussels. It showed some stuff the resistance and intelligence people used. Quite remarkable things for that time.
The Battle of Britain could only have been a turning point if its failure had allowed Britain to regain the initiative and at some point defeat Germany and the reality is that it didn't, it would be far more accurate to say the declaration of war on America was the turning point in the West but even that is debatable given that I am not sure the Western Allies could have gained a foothold on European soil without having 2/3 of the German army bled white in Russia.

Lets be honest here most of the troops and all of the divisions garrisoning France in 1944 were understrength, under equipped, half trained troops made up of recovering units from Russia, troops unfit for front line service in Russia and foreign conscripts that didn't want to be there anyway and D-Day was still a touch and go affair.

The Battle of Britain created a stalemate that would most likely still be the front line if not for the war in the East.

Germany lost the war because:
A) It was not ready for a long war.
B) Hitler and half his inner circle were a few sandwiches short of a picnic.
C) The German High Command made a lot of errors that eventually overwhelmed them and the largest error was not growing a nut sack and putting a bullet through Hitler in 1935.
D) Taking on more than they can handle, no matter how good you are no one is capable of ruling the world, every empire through out history has tried and failed.
February 21st, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
There is an suggestion that the Germans did not so much loose the Battle of Britain as much as loose interest in it because Hitler was more focused in the Soviet Union.
The inability of the Germans to focus on one campaign long enough to secure a final victory, rather than darting from one to another, like an excited child in a toy shop, also gave their enemy time to recover and regroup.
February 21st, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
There is an suggestion that the Germans did not so much loose the Battle of Britain as much as loose interest in it because Hitler was more focused in the Soviet Union.
The inability of the Germans to focus on one campaign long enough to secure a final victory, rather than darting from one to another, like an excited child in a toy shop, also gave their enemy time to recover and regroup.

Personally I would suggest that they knew Operation Sealion was not going to go ahead and therefore there was no point in continuing the Battle of Britain, they then switched to bombing cities and infrastructure in order to hinder British ability to regain strength at minimal cost and moved the bulk of their forces to the next objective.

Even had the Luftwaffe been able to destroy every airfield in Southern England the RAF would have simply moved North out of German fighter range and carried on the fight.
Any German invasion would still have to come through the Royal Navy covered by the RAF protected by a Kriegsmarine that had been soundly hammered in Norway, in the end I think it was fairly obvious no invasion of Britain was possible, the only available opportunity was on the heels of the Dunkirk evacuation when chaos reigned not in September.
February 21st, 2012  
LeEnfield
 
 
Basically Hitler lost the war for the following reasons
[1] He tried to fight on to many fronts
[3] He was fighting to many different countries
[3] He could not make up for all the losses suffered on these different fronts.
[4] He was out produced by the Americans and Russians and did not have the air power to disrupt their production.

Basically he was just ground down in finish
February 21st, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
[4] He was out produced by the Americans and Russians and did not have the air power to disrupt their production.
Basically he was just ground down in finish
Thats the truth!
He couldn't reach across the Atlantic or beyond the Urals, and the tidal wave of Shermans and T-34s (among other things) wore away at him creating losses he could not replace.
February 22nd, 2012  
lljadw
 
He also was outproduced by Britain and its Commonwealth
February 22nd, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljadw
He also was outproduced by Britain and its Commonwealth
That is very true, but the factories in Britain were in range of the Luftwaffe and though the air raids themselves did not create as much damage as expected, there was disruption to production.
Also, we never had the capacity of production that the USA and USSR had.
 


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