Foot cavalry




 
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December 26th, 2004  
WannabeRanger
 

Topic: Foot cavalry


What exactly is foot cavalry. I was on another site and this came up and I would like to know what it is. Are they infantry that accompanies the cavalry or what? Any info would be appreciated.
December 26th, 2004  
EuroSpike
 

Topic: Re: Foot cavalry


Quote:
Originally Posted by WannabeRanger
What exactly is foot cavalry. I was on another site and this came up and I would like to know what it is. Are they infantry that accompanies the cavalry or what? Any info would be appreciated.
Cavalry without horses. Personally i don't see any other point in using cavalry status but tradition.
December 27th, 2004  
03USMC
 
 
It depends on what site you were on. During the American Civil War The Stonewall Brigade commanded by Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson was referred to as Jacksons Foot Cavalry due to their rapid movements.
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December 30th, 2004  
CavScout
 
It could refer to mounted or dismounted Cavalry movements, in particular scouting.
December 30th, 2004  
Claymore
 
 
03USMC is right. The term comes from the American Civil War.
I believe that it originated during Jackson's Valley campaign in 1862.
July 24th, 2005  
LeEnfield
 
 
In Britain we had the mounted Riflemen, who ride up to action then fight on foot. The horses were just to get them to action as quick as possible and as fresh as possible. Then they would use what cover there was to fight the enemy and drive him out of fixed position as horses in a lot of cases would have just provided a bigger target with out any gain.
September 28th, 2005  
Evil Maniac From Mars
 

Topic: Re: Foot cavalry


Quote:
Originally Posted by EuroSpike
Cavalry without horses. Personally i don't see any other point in using cavalry status but tradition.
Yes, sometimes cavalry titles stuck with people even after they quit the cavalry, for example Baron von Ritchhofen was a Rittmeister even after he became a pilot. Maybe his was a special case, but it is rather interesting.
September 29th, 2005  
Kevin
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeEnfield
In Britain we had the mounted Riflemen, who ride up to action then fight on foot. The horses were just to get them to action as quick as possible and as fresh as possible. Then they would use what cover there was to fight the enemy and drive him out of fixed position as horses in a lot of cases would have just provided a bigger target with out any gain.
Wouldn't that be known as a dragoon.