Fighter Jet Signals China's Military Advances




 
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January 11th, 2007  
Team Infidel
 
 

Topic: Fighter Jet Signals China's Military Advances


Christian Science Monitor
January 11, 2007
China unveiled the locally built Jian-10 last week, saying it narrows the gap with advanced nations.
By Peter Ford, Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor
BEIJING -- A sleek, swept-wing fighter-bomber dubbed the "Jian-10," unveiled here last week, is more than just another jet plane. It is China's calling card, announcing Beijing's arrival among the top ranks of military manufacturers.
Powered by Chinese engines and firing Chinese precision-guided missiles, the locally built Jian-10 has "allowed China to become the fourth country in the world" to have developed such a capability, "narrowing the gap with advanced nations," boasted Geng Ruguang, deputy general manager of the plane's manufacturer, Avic-I.
The latest fruit of a military modernization drive that has produced an indigenous Chinese nuclear attack submarine, early warning aircraft, frigates and destroyers, cruise missiles, and computerized command and control systems, the Jian-10 is "a decisive step by China toward becoming an aviation power," the official Xinhua news agency declared.
The plane is also a new symbol of China's role-reversal in the global arms industry. "Most technology analysts have been surprised by the speed with which China has gone from being an arms-buying country to one with real promise of being a producer of front-edge military technology," says Denny Roy, senior researcher at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu.
Neighbors wary of China's military advances
To some of China's neighbors, though, that promise looks more like a threat. And Pentagon officials, too, have repeatedly urged Beijing to explain more clearly the purpose behind a military buildup that has seen defense spending rise by more than 10 percent a year since 1990, according to official Chinese figures.
Offering rare insights into the Chinese leadership's strategic view of the world, the government issued a defense white paper at the end of last year, in a bid to clarify its military policies.
The paper declares that "China's overall security environment remains sound," but notes "challenges that must not be neglected."
Chief among them, it says, is "the struggle to oppose and contain the separatist forces for 'Taiwan independence,' " which "remains a hard one." Beijing claims the island of Taiwan as its own - a position rejected by the government in Taipei.
The white paper, the first of its kind in two years, sets ambitious military goals for the People's Liberation Army (PLA), harping repeatedly on the need for technological modernization. By the middle of this century, China should be "capable of winning informationized wars," it says, referring to the computerized battlefield on which future wars will be fought.
Such capabilities, China insists, are "purely defensive in nature," and the report does not repeat the threat contained in the last white paper to crush any serious move toward Taiwanese independence "resolutely and thoroughly."
It does, however, note disapprovingly of heightened US-Japanese military cooperation, as Tokyo and Washington build a joint missile shield designed to protect Japan from North Korean missiles. Beijing appears to worry that Taiwan may one day be brought under this shield, blunting the mainland's military strength in any cross-Strait conflict.
The white paper came on the heels of a speech by President Hu Jintao calling for a stronger "blue water" navy with the ability to range far from home ports. "We should strive to build a powerful navy that adapts to the needs of our military's historical mission in this new century," Mr. Hu said.
"We should make sound preparations for military struggles and ensure the forces can effectively carry out missions at any time," he added.
What such missions might be was hinted at in the white paper, which mentions "ensur[ing] the interests of national development" as a key element of China's defense policy, and refers to security issues including "energy, resources, finance, information, and international shipping routes."
Buildup needed to protect trade, China says
A Pentagon report last year detected Chinese ambitions to build a fleet capable of protecting the sea lanes that carry the country's vital oil imports through the Straits of Malacca, and of operating even farther afield, in the Indian Ocean.
China's growing political and economic interests, especially its worldwide appetite for imported raw materials, mean that it sees defending those interests in ever broader terms, says Dr. Roy.
"As such a big country, with an ever more global outlook, what China needs to do to defend its national interests will inevitably impinge on the interests of other countries," Roy predicts, and "it will demand a degree of diplomatic skill" to assuage neighbors' suspicions of Chinese intentions, he adds.
Many Western analysts accept Chinese officials' argument that military spending has increased only in line with their country's economic rise. Officially, spending is set at $36.4 billion this year, but it is generally believed to be about twice that.
But while "their focus is defensive, any weapon can be used offensively," points out Robert Karniol, Asia-Pacific bureau chief for Jane's Defence Weekly. The White Paper sets out "primarily defensive concepts," he says, "but they are based on a degree of offensive capability and they have the capacity to undertake purely offensive operations if desired.
"The political environment is very stable at present ... but neighbors look at the concentrated buildup of China's military capabilities and it's at that, not the politics, where they have to concentrate their strategic thinking," Mr. Karniol argues. "Because intentions can change."
January 11th, 2007  
bulldogg
 
 
Quote:
"We should strive to build a powerful navy that adapts to the needs of our military's historical mission in this new century," Mr. Hu said.
"We should make sound preparations for military struggles and ensure the forces can effectively carry out missions at any time," he added.


There it is ladies and germs in black and friggin white. "Historical mission" is the code for reclaiming all territory once a part of China READ TAIWAN.

Its coming. If it were me I'd do it during the Olympics in 2008. The carriers and their jets will be online and in Beijing will be a million human shields from around the globe.
January 11th, 2007  
Wolf
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulldogg

There it is ladies and germs in black and friggin white. "Historical mission" is the code for reclaiming all territory once a part of China READ TAIWAN.

Its coming. If it were me I'd do it during the Olympics in 2008. The carriers and their jets will be online and in Beijing will be a million human shields from around the globe.
I'd suspected the same thing ever since I'd heard about China's Navy several months ago.
We'll see... Only time will tell.
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January 11th, 2007  
5.56X45mm
 
 
Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition because the devil is coming and he has a made in Communist China sticker on his ass.
January 12th, 2007  
jequirity
 
 
Rhubarb Rhubarb Rhubarb!
January 12th, 2007  
sandy
 
jianshy-10yes,I know it.
many countries are interested in that bird for later of F-5
January 12th, 2007  
major liability
 
 
Is the Jian really that great? I bet a Raptor could smoke it easy.
January 13th, 2007  
ASTRALdragon
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by major liability
Is the Jian really that great? I bet a Raptor could smoke it easy.
The Jian-10 is nowhere near as advanced as the F-22, but China's production of it just shows how far they have come as a nation of buying technology to actually designing their own. Although anyone with 2 brain cells knows that China stole/bought most (if not all) of their technical knowledge.

Most countries go through steps in advancement. What makes China suspect in technological theft is that they've jumped a few steps and some of their advancements have gaps in them. They may have some great engineers (trained in other countries of course), but there is no way a county and make that kind of a jump in technology, especially aerospace military. It's like they had a slingshot yesterday and today they have a P90. That sort of stuff just doesn't happen unless you have alien technology.
January 14th, 2007  
CABAL
 
 
Quote:
Is the Jian really that great? I bet a Raptor could smoke it easy.
Drill this into your mind. J-10 fourth generation, F-22 Raptor fifth generation.


Quote:
There it is ladies and germs in black and friggin white. "Historical mission" is the code for reclaiming all territory once a part of China READ TAIWAN.

Its coming. If it were me I'd do it during the Olympics in 2008. The carriers and their jets will be online and in Beijing will be a million human shields from around the globe.
Put the conspiracy theory aside:

The PLAAF have been using the J-7, J-8 for a very long period of time. The Bulk of their air force are comprise of very old models with the exception of several Su-27SK, Su-27UBK, and Su-30MKK. If you compare its hardware with their fellow Asian Neighbors, you gotta admit...not so impressive for China.

During the Cold War, the Chinese Military adopted the "People's War" doctrine that reflected its technological backwardness compared to NATO/Warsaw Pact nations. It was later revealed that the Chinese military cannot withstand a military strike used against Iraq during the First Gulf War and was also labeled, by many western military analysts, as the "largest Military museum in the world".

And how about China's adversaries India, who also have a voracious appetite for foreign arms these days. Little is reported/criticized about them. Oh yes, its because they are a Democracy! Damn Rubbish! Democratic nations seen as the "good guys"? Indian Nationalism is rising, which in fact have contributed to many conflicts in the past with neighboring countries especially with Pakistan. Combine both Nationalism and Democracy together,the next step you see is war.

Despite what liberals and the Washington blue team think, India and China seek the same goals: 1. Projection of Power. 2. Respect. 3. Prestige. 4. Beat the West technologically and economically. The J-10, which is still being outperformed by the Su-30MMK, is more of a demonstration of their technological advancement and national pride rather than a boost of their capabilities. Both India and China seek self-determination and self-reliance, the J-10 is an example of China's climb towards self-reliance.

Lastly, China will not have a single fully operational carrier by 2008. Were are you getting these insane ideas from?
January 14th, 2007  
A Can of Man
 
 
The rate in which they're improving is crazy and will be America's next great challenge, one where America could even lose if it doesn't get its stuff together.
The war on terror? Losing it will be a huge embarassment and a big blow on prestige and reputation. But it's not the end of America's hegemony.
Lose the all encompassing race against the Chinese, and it's over. The US of A will be 2nd rate.
Defeat is a real possibility and I just HOPE we can get our stuff together and the public realizes that the safety, wealth and freedom in American soil isn't free or guaranteed. It's not so much a right, as I think it's a privilage of living in a country that's got economic and military superiority. Lose the superiority and you lose those "rights" as well.
This is the next Cold War and the signs aren't too good.
The Chinese don't have any tradition of regard to human rights or any of those humanistic values that we believe to be important. It's not so much that they are "evil" or anything it's that the whole idea of the individual is simply extremely different. It may be hard to understand but it's true. It's just different. The individual is not important there as it is to us.
What I'm saying is, a lot of the values on human rights etc. that are championed by the US has spread thanks to the US being the sole super power. Even the IDEAS themselves have been planted in places where it was unimaginable. Democracy? In Korea? Geez. Do you really think it would have ever happened without any American influence?
If we lose, the values we believe to be important will gradually be replaced by the Chinese ones. If we lose, it's more than just power and prestige at stake. I don't know, but I just find these values pretty important.
The new fighter, and the new this and thats, signals a new era in Chinese history. They're changing. Human waves no more. They're getting high tech and smart.
 


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