Favorite War Era Aircraft. - Page 6




 
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February 14th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
Thats awesome! and a bit of a flash git!
In Chuck Yeager's book, "Yeager", He tells of an F-104 pilot who had engine failure at take off, but because it was an early A model, it still had a downward firing ejector seat
To avoid rocketting into the runway, he tried to roll the aircraft before ejecting, but he mis-timed it and went out sideways, slamming into a hangar!
February 14th, 2012  
BritinBritain
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
To avoid rocketting into the runway, he tried to roll the aircraft before ejecting, but he mis-timed it and went out sideways, slamming into a hangar!
I bet that hurt.

We heard numerous in the RAF tales of ejector mishaps. I think one of the worst was when a Hawker Hunter was being worked on inside the hanger. The red safety pin wasn't inserted and when a mech was working in the cockpit he inadvertently pulled the ejector handle. From what I hear the fire section had to hose bits of him off the rafters.

I have vague memories of a Lightning pilot ejecting at Tengah in Singapore, the aircraft inverted as he ejected slamming him into the runway. A black bag and shovel job.
February 14th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
I bet that hurt.

We heard numerous in the RAF tales of ejector mishaps. I think one of the worst was when a Hawker Hunter was being worked on inside the hanger. The red safety pin wasn't inserted and when a mech was working in the cockpit he inadvertently pulled the ejector handle. From what I hear the fire section had to hose bits of him off the rafters.

I have vague memories of a Lightning pilot ejecting at Tengah in Singapore, the aircraft inverted as he ejected slamming him into the runway. A black bag and shovel job.
I like the story of the RAF engineering officer sat in a Ligthing cockpit which had the ejector seat removed for servicing.
He was sat on a box and trying to solve a glitch with one of the engines, a sticky throttle or something.
The machine was running and he managed to jump the chocks and get the thing in the air!
If that wasn't enough, he flew a circuit and landed safely. (and the canopy was missing too!)
Apparently the Aircraft in question was Lightning Mk 1A XM135
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February 14th, 2012  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
I bet that hurt.

We heard numerous in the RAF tales of ejector mishaps. I think one of the worst was when a Hawker Hunter was being worked on inside the hanger. The red safety pin wasn't inserted and when a mech was working in the cockpit he inadvertently pulled the ejector handle. From what I hear the fire section had to hose bits of him off the rafters.

I have vague memories of a Lightning pilot ejecting at Tengah in Singapore, the aircraft inverted as he ejected slamming him into the runway. A black bag and shovel job.
I can tell of two mishaps but I didn't hear then first hand.

One was in Somalia when Belgian paratroopers inspected a Mig fighter. The one who climbed in the cockpit was able to give himself a free "ejector seat flight". It was also his last.

The second was when Belgian pilots went to Sweden to test the Viggen as a replacement for the F-104's. During a fast and very low flight just above the waves of the sea the Belgian "passenger" (it was a two seat Viggen) somehow managed to eject. I don't know if he thought he was going to crash or that he could not keep his hands off something. But I'm told that a such a flight is very scary and difficult.
February 14th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
I can tell of two mishaps but I didn't hear then first hand.

One was in Somalia when Belgian paratroopers inspected a Mig fighter. The one who climbed in the cockpit was able to give himself a free "ejector seat flight". It was also his last.
.
Something similar happened in the Falklands.
Some playful Paras triggered the ejector seat of a Pucara.
I believe they did it remotely, using rope tied to the firing handle.
This Pucara is the one on display in the Imperial War Museum Duxford.
February 14th, 2012  
I3BrigPvSk
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
I can tell of two mishaps but I didn't hear then first hand.

One was in Somalia when Belgian paratroopers inspected a Mig fighter. The one who climbed in the cockpit was able to give himself a free "ejector seat flight". It was also his last.

The second was when Belgian pilots went to Sweden to test the Viggen as a replacement for the F-104's. During a fast and very low flight just above the waves of the sea the Belgian "passenger" (it was a two seat Viggen) somehow managed to eject. I don't know if he thought he was going to crash or that he could not keep his hands off something. But I'm told that a such a flight is very scary and difficult.
So Belgium pondered to purchase Wiggen? I did not know that, there is a story about when a MIG pursued a Wiggen, the Wiggen went low over the Baltic sea and the MIG...tried to be a submarine
February 15th, 2012  
muscogeemike
 
There is some controversy over the Sea Fury vs. MiG happening - but I’m willing to go along with it. Better documented is Cpt. Clinton Johnson in a USN Skyraider shooting down a MiG 17 over VN on 20 June 1965.

I totally agree that the pilot experience is often key to victory. A great example of this is Saburo Sakai, flying an old “Zero”, engaging, and surviving, several Hellcats over Iwo Jima.

When it comes to Gen. Yeager - I think he may have won flying a WWI fighter!
February 15th, 2012  
Yossarian
 
 
In terms of technical know how, Yeager might have actually pulled something like that off.

Goes to show you that it often helps to know your machine inside and out.

His performance in the P 51 during this time period can been seen as an example of that. Real Tech guy, not really an academy type when he approached flying.

Really enjoy researching his career.

As with any type of flying during the World War and inter war period.
February 15th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by muscogeemike
There is some controversy over the Sea Fury vs. MiG happening - but I’m willing to go along with it. Better documented is Cpt. Clinton Johnson in a USN Skyraider shooting down a MiG 17 over VN on 20 June 1965.
There is no controversy at all over the Sea Fury v Mig engagement.
On the 9th August 1952, Commander Peter Carmichael of 802 Naval Air Squandron was leading four Sea Furys when they were bounced by eigth Mig 15s.
In the ensuing dog fight Carmichael shot down one Mig.
All four Furys returned undamged.
Had the Migs made a high speed, guns blazing pass, they would have more than likely shot down the Furys but, by slowing down and try to mix it with the Sea Furys, they gave away their advantage of speed and handed the fight to the Royal Navy on their terms.
February 15th, 2012  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostrider
So Belgium pondered to purchase Wiggen? I did not know that, there is a story about when a MIG pursued a Wiggen, the Wiggen went low over the Baltic sea and the MIG...tried to be a submarine
Yes, and a lot of pilots liked it. The other contenders were the Mirage F-1 and the F-16, wich was choosen.

There was another Swedish plane , the Saab 105, that the Belgians tested for the Fouga Magister replacement. The Dassault Alphajet was choosen.
 


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