Favorite War Era Aircraft. - Page 5




 
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February 12th, 2012  
Yossarian
 
 
Hence why I mentioned the Mikoyan 25 Foxbat, huge engines, high speed long range missiles, made for a one pass go at any B 52s closing to close to Soviet Airspace.

Just observing that the concept was not entirely new, nor the notion entirely origonal for the Soviets.

The Komet still is a very very interesting approach to what history could have been.
February 13th, 2012  
MontyB
 
 
The British SR-53 project was a post war offshoot evolution of the Me-163 and it was relatively successful or at least showed great potential.
February 13th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontyB
The British SR-53 project was a post war offshoot evolution of the Me-163 and it was relatively successful or at least showed great potential.
It did indeed show potential, until it was scuppered by Lockheed and the F-104.
The problem with the Saunders Roe 53 was that the rocket engine was dead weight when not in use, a bit like the Yak-38 Forger and its vertical lift engine.
The problem with aircraft designs that have two separate engines for different roles, is that it is dead weight, and as shown with the Forger, you have to rely on it starting up again when needed.
The Harrier was successful because the engine that made it go up and down, also made it go forwards, and backwards!
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February 13th, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
It did indeed show potential, until it was scuppered by Lockheed and the F-104.
The problem with the Saunders Roe 53 was that the rocket engine was dead weight when not in use, a bit like the Yak-38 Forger and its vertical lift engine.
The problem with aircraft designs that have two separate engines for different roles, is that it is dead weight, and as shown with the Forger, you have to rely on it starting up again when needed.
The Harrier was successful because the engine that made it go up and down, also made it go forwards, and backwards!
Don't forget sideways. It was a brilliant aircraft and as I have mentioned many times before, what a pity that the supersonic version wasn't built.

As a boy I remember the tests which were carried out on the "flying bedstead." Very strange concept at the time.

A lot of aircraft with potential have been scrapped because of Duncan Sandys infamous white paper regarding piloted aircraft. It really peeves me when politicians poke their noses in where they have no expertise at all
February 13th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
Don't forget sideways.
Oh blimey yes!
That thing was an incredible aircraft!
Shame its gone
February 13th, 2012  
BritinAfrica
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
Oh blimey yes!
That thing was an incredible aircraft!
Shame its gone
I don't know if the US Marines are still keeping theirs. Any gen?
February 13th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BritinAfrica
I don't know if the US Marines are still keeping theirs. Any gen?
Not sure, but I hope they do for their sake and don't go for that flying foul up the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter!
February 13th, 2012  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
You've got to give the Meteor its due.
First flew in 1943.
Retired from RAF service in 1980.
A good basic design with a lot lot of longevity in it.
The DC3 Dakota is another good example.
First flew in 1935, and still being used.
The Meteor also served with the Belgian Air Force from 1948 - 1963, most of them were F.8

February 13th, 2012  
VDKMS
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper1854
In the early 70s when there was the "crisis" in Belize with the neighboring Guatemalans, the carrier, Ark Royal was dispatched and her Buccaneers did a fly over as a deterence to any hostile action.
Guatemala's airforce was still equiped with Mustangs.
That would have proved interesting, but saying that, during Korea, a Sea Fury shot down a Mig 15.
That was mainly because the Mig slowed down to engage the Sea Fury and flew within the Fury's envelope.
The Argentinian Mirages did the same with the Sea Harriers.
They gave up their advantages in speed to engage a more maneuverable adversary.
It can be said the pilot is the key. A more experienced pilot in a lesser aircraft will win over a less experienced pilot in a better machine.
When the USA got hold of a Mig-15 during Korea, it was being tested by Chuck Yeager.
A General claimed it was a better airplane than the F-86 but Yeager said that it was the skill of the pilot that mattered more.
He took on the General flying in the Mig against him in the F-86, then vice versa, and "waxed his tail" both times.
What about this pilot?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=jyBDEG9dg-Q
February 13th, 2012  
Trooper1854
 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VDKMS
The Meteor also served with the Belgian Air Force from 1948 - 1963, most of them were F.8

I think the Meteor served with nearly 20 airforces and had 20 variants, opperational and test versions.
Another example of getting the best out of a solid design.
 


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